Home Page  
 
 

SPECIFICATIONS
  • 2.35:1 Anamorphic Widescreen
  • English Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono
  • English subtitles
  • 1 Disc
FEATURES
  • Audio commentary by director Robert Altman
  • Stills gallery of rare production and publicity photos
  • Original theatrical trailer

3 Women


Reviewed by: Chris Galloway

Directed By: Robert Altman
Starring: Shelley Duvall, Sissy Spacek, Janice Rule
1977 | 124 Minutes | Licensor: 20th Century Fox

Release Information
DVD | MSRP: $39.95 | Series: The Criterion Collection | Edition: #230
RLJ Entertainment

Release Date: April 20, 2004
Review Date: January 14, 2012

Purchase From:
amazon.com  amazon.ca

Share:

SYNOPSIS

In a dusty, under-populated California resort town, Pinky Rose (Sissy Spacek), a naÔve and impressionable Southern waif begins her life as a nursing home attendant. There, Pinky finds her role model in fellow nurse "Thoroughly Modern" Millie Lammoreaux (Shelley Duvall), a misguided would-be sophisticate and hopeless devotee of Cosmopolitan and Woman's Day magazines. When Millie accepts Pinky into her home at the Purple Sage singles complex, Pinky's hero-worship evolves into something far stranger and more sinister than either could have anticipated. Featuring brilliant performances from Spacek and Duvall, Robert Altman's dreamlike masterpiece, 3 Women, careens from the humorous to the chilling to the surreal, resulting in one of the most unusual and compelling films of the 1970s.

Forum members rate this film 8.3/10

 

Discuss the film and DVD here   


PICTURE

Robert Altmanís 1977 film never saw the light of day on home video in North America until Criterion released it on DVD in 2004. On it the film is presented in its original aspect ratio of 2.35:1 on a dual-layer disc and has been enhanced for widescreen televisions.

Though a Blu-ray released recently does best the presentation here the standard-definition transfer the DVD offers still looks fairly stunning. The print is in excellent condition and blemishes are few and far between, a tram line probably the worst offender in a couple of places. The transfer itself is sharp with a strong amount of detail, and colours manage to pop off the screen, with the blues especially striking. Compression noise is kept down and I didnít detect any major artifacts like edge-enhancement or halos. The transfer overall is smooth and clean and upscaled still looks pretty good. Again, the Blu-ray is better because itís able to offer a more natural image, but as far as standard Ėdefinition transfers go, this oneís pretty sharp.

8/10

All DVD screen captures are presented in their original size from the source disc. Images have been compressed slightly to conserve space. While they are not exact representations they should offer a general idea of overall video quality.

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

AUDIO

The Dolby Digital 1.0 mono track is acceptable and delivers the film as one would expect. The track is clean with articulate dialogue and clear, clean music. The track is free of any distortion and noise, and despite the age actually has some life behind it.

7/10

SUPPLEMENTS

The film is probably one of Altmanís odder ones, a surreal nightmare that is more David Lynch than typical Altman, so one would expect maybe more material here, and if not for that at least maybe for the fact this marks itís home video debut. But no, we really only get one supplement and that supplement is (at least) the audio commentary by director Robert Altman. For those possibly hoping for an explanation to the film you may be disappointed, though Altman does throw out some ďbonesĒ so to say when he talks about the themes of the film, but in the end it sounds as though Altman was more interested in making a film that ďfeelsĒ a certain way and was dependent on its visuals rather than telling a truly linear tale. Past this Altman primarily talks about the various aspects of the production, such as the dream that inspired it, getting the financing for the film (which sounded almost too easy considering what Altman went to those at Fox with) and offers an incredibly amount of praise to the performers in the film, particularly Duvall who pretty much created every aspect of her character. Itís a strong track and worth a listen, which is good since there isnít much else on here.

The remaining supplements are primarily marketing or PR in nature. Thereís an incredibly large photo gallery (more than 150 photos) showing publicity shots, on set photos from various locations, photos of the cast and crew, and a small section midway through devoted to Bodhi Windís artwork, even showing the artist at work. After this we get a teaser trailer which plays stills from the film over Duvallís voice reading from her diary, a theatrical trailer, which presents clips from the film with narration from the filmís three women, each reading from a diary by the sounds of it. There are then 2 TV spots which present the film as more of a thriller but still manages to touch the themes of identity found in the film in their (lame) tagline.

The DVD then comes with an insert containing the same essay by David Sterritt, covering the filmís production and the themes within the film. Mixed with the commentary it does aid a little in deciphering the film.

The commentaryís great but itís disappointing that not much else wasnít added especially when one considers the film had never been available on home video in North America prior to this edition.

5/10

CLOSING

The commentary is at least good but itís a little upsetting there isnít much else. But having it finally get a home video release was probably more than enough for most people, and the fact that the transfer is a strong one makes it far better than having nothing at all.


View packaging for this DVD

Share: 



Purchase From:
amazon.com  amazon.ca  




Join our Facebook Group (requires Facebook account)

This site is not affiliated with The Criterion Collection