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Classe tous risques
SPECIFICATIONS
  • 1.66:1 Widescreen
  • 1.66:1 Anamorphic Widescreen
  • French Mono
  • French PCM Mono
  • English subtitles
  • 2 Discs
FEATURES
  • Monsieur Ventura documentary
  • French and U.S. Trailers

Classe tous risques

Dual-Format Edition
Reviewed by: Chris Galloway

Directed By: Claude Sautet
Starring: Lino Ventura, Jean-Paul Belmondo
1960 | 108 Minutes

Release Information
Blu-ray | MSRP: £19.99 | Series: BFI
BFI Video

Release Date: February 24, 2014
Review Date: February 24, 2014

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SYNOPSIS

Starring the great Italian-born character actor Lino Ventura as a once-powerful Parisian gangster who has grown weary of his exile in Italy and longs to return home to his wife and two small children in Paris. In order to finance this ambition he decides to pull one last job - boldly executed in broad daylight on the streets of Milan. His getaway proves dangerous but when he enlists the help of his old partners-in-crime, they are reluctant to risk their own safety and instead send a complete stranger - the fresh-faced Eric Stark (Jean-Paul Belmondo) - to escort their former comrade to Paris.


PICTURE

BFI presents Claude Sautetís Classe tous risques on Blu-ray, presenting the film in its original aspect ratio of about 1.66:1 on a dual-layer disc. The high-definition transfer is delivered in 1080p/24hz. It should also be noted that this is a region B disc and North American viewers will require a player that can play back such content.

BFIís transfer offers a clear and notable improvement over Criterionís own DVD edition of the film. The image is simply quite stunning with an unbelievably crisp image. Fine object detail really pops, delivering a great sense of texture and depth with all objects on screen. This holds true on both close-ups and long shots. Contrast looks strong and black levels deliver some great, inky blacks. Gray levels are also clean and distinct, with fabulous shifts in tone. Film grain remains and there are no problematic artifacts to report.

There are a few minor blemishes remaining in the print but it has been cleaned up thoroughly otherwise. Looking over my coverage of Criterionís DVD edition I noticed I mentioned I felt there may have been some mis-framing of the picture, though Iím embarrassed to admit Iím not entirely sure why I felt this. Sampling the Criterion DVD again I noticed some tight framing in places and places where tops of heads were slightly cut off, but nothing overly offensive. The BFI, as far as I could see, has the same look so Iím guessing whatever it was I was overreacting and that this is the intended look.

Past all of that we get one hell of a presentation, looking like it could have been filmed recently. It looks absolutely wonderful.

9/10

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AUDIO

The 2-channel PCM mono track is serviceable. Dialogue is clear and music sounds pretty good, but thatís about it. The soundtrack is still fairly bland and tinny, a limitation of the source materials Iím sure. Still, the track is at least free of damage and distortion.

6/10

SUPPLEMENTS

BFI doesnít include a lot of on-disc material, but in all fairness neither did Criterionís edition, which had features that totaled altogether a rather short running time. BFI includes what is really just one significant feature, a 35-minute documentary about Lino Ventura, Monsieur Ventura. Gathering together interviews with friends, family and peers it goes over his career and life, starting with his fairly rough childhood to boxing career. He would eventually be called by Jacques Becker and then from there he continued his career. It looks at a number of his films and delves into his acting style, the types of roles he was good at, and how picky he became later on. There are some amusing anecdotes and decent reflections on the man (and we even get archival interviews.) Itís nothing but a quickly edited talking-heads video, but itís quick and informative.

The disc features then close with a French trailer and a U.S. trailer.

BFI then includes a booklet with some decent material. First there is a strong essay on the film by John Patterson followed by a nice piece by Geoff Andrew on director Claude Sautet. There are then some notes on the features and the transfer.

A very slim release but the documentary proves to be a nice inclusion, as does the booklet.

4/10

CLOSING

Extras are slim but BFIís transfer looks fantastic, making it worth picking up for that alone.

(Again this disc will only playback on Region B Blu-ray players.)




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