Home Page  
 
 

SPECIFICATIONS
  • 1.66:1 Anamorphic Widescreen
  • English Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono
  • Swedish Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono
  • English subtitles
  • 1 Disc
FEATURES
  • Ingmar Bergman: Reflections on Life, Death, and Love with Erland Josephson (2000)-A candid and revealing 52-minute interview with Bergman and long-time collaborator Erland Josephson, originally broadcast on Swedish television
  • Optional English-dubbed soundtrack

Cries & Whispers

2001 Edition
Reviewed by: Chris Galloway

Directed By: Ingmar Bergman
Starring: Harriet Andersson, Kari Sylwan, Ingrid Thulin, Liv Ullmann, Anders Ek, Inga Gill, Erland Josephson, Henning Moritzen, Georg Arlin
1972 | 91 Minutes | Licensor: Svensk Filmindustri

Release Information
DVD | MSRP: $29.95 | Series: The Criterion Collection | Edition: #101 | Out of print
RLJ Entertainment

Release Date: June 19, 2001
Review Date: April 30, 2015

Purchase From:
amazon.com  amazon.ca

Share:

SYNOPSIS

Legendary director Ingmar Bergman creates a testament to the strength of the soul-and a film of absolute power. Karin and Maria come to the aid of their dying sister, Agnes, but jealousy, manipulation, and selfishness come before empathy. Agnes, tortured by cancer, transcends the pettiness of her sisters' concerns to remember moments of being-moments that Bergman, with the help of Academy Award&tm;-winning cinematographer Sven Nykvist, translates into pictures of staggering beauty and unfathomable horror.

Forum members rate this film 7.7/10

 

Discuss the film and DVD here   


PICTURE

Criterionís original DVD edition for Ingmar Bergmanís Cries and Whispers presents the film in its original aspect ratio of about 1.66:1 on a dual-layer disc. The standard-definition presentation has been enhanced for widescreen televisions.

For an older DVD transfer it doesnít look altogether bad. The restoration work has been rather thorough, with only a few marks remaining, limited mostly to just specs of dirt that pop up here and there. Film grain has actually been left intact and itís handled rather well for a standard-definition encode, but upscaled to a high-def television it looks a bit noisy and splotchy.

Detail is quite good for the most part, particularly on close-ups. A few longer shots lack definition, though, and come off a bit fuzzy. The film looks a bit dark, and blacks can crush out some details in the shadows, but colours otherwise look fine. Red plays a very prominent part in the look of the film and they mostly look good here. Unfortunately DVD never handled reds altogether that well and there are moments where they look more orange rather than red.

It is open to a lot of improvement, and the new Blu-ray clearly outdoes this edition, but for the period it was released it wasnít a bad looking presentation.

7/10

All DVD screen captures are presented in their original size from the source disc. Images have been compressed slightly to conserve space. While they are not exact representations they should offer a general idea of overall video quality.

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

AUDIO

The film comes with both the original Swedish audio and then an English dub. Both are presented in Dolby Digital 1.0 mono. Of the two the Swedish is the better sounding track, though still a product of its age. Though fairly clean it still has a real hollow, flat sound to it. Fidelity is lacking and volume levels are pretty one note. The English track sounds a bit edgier and unnatural on the other hand, so most will probably want to stick with that.

6/10

SUPPLEMENTS

The original DVD only included one feature of a note, but it was a solid one: Ingmar Bergman: Reflections on Life, Death, and Love with Erland Josephson, a 52-minute interview featuring Bergman and Josephson talking with interviewer Malou von Sivers. The two talk extensively about themselves and do cover their work together, though talk more about their personal lives (which they are surprisingly open about, admitting to their mistakes) and touch on the subjects in the title, particularly love and death. Not specific to Cries and Whispers and admittedly itís not very focused on their work, but itís an enjoyable and worthwhile addition.

The only other item of note is a very short 2-page essay by scholar Peter Cowie, which can be found in the included insert. He offers a nice scholarly examination of the film but itís too brief.

Though the interview is a good inclusion and well worth viewing, it was always disappointing this didnít receive a more analytical set of features.

3/10

CLOSING

It disappoints in the way of supplements, but the transfer is still decent for an older DVD, but it has been boosted by Criterionís recent Blu-ray edition.


View packaging for this DVD

Share: 



Purchase From:
amazon.com  amazon.ca  




Join our Facebook Group (requires Facebook account)

This site is not affiliated with The Criterion Collection