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SPECIFICATIONS
  • 1.33:1 Standard
  • Turkish Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono
  • Turkish PCM Mono
  • English subtitles
  • 3 Discs
FEATURES
  • Introduction by Martin Scorsese
  • Interview with filmmaker Faith Akin

Dry Summer

Dual-Format Edition
Reviewed by: Chris Galloway

Directed By: Metin Erksan
1964 | 90 Minutes | Licensor: World Cinema Project

Release Information
Blu-ray | MSRP: $124.95 | Series: The Criterion Collection | Edition: #688
RLJ Entertainment

Release Date: December 10, 2013
Review Date: December 15, 2013

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SYNOPSIS

Winner of the prestigious Golden Bear at the 1964 Berlin International Film Festival, Metin Erksan's wallop of a melodrama follows the machinations of an unrepentantly selfish tobacco farmer who builds a dam to prevent water from flowing downhill to his neighbors' crops. Alongside this tale of soul-devouring competition is one of overheated desire, as a love triangle develops between the farmer, his more decent brother, and the beautiful villager the latter takes as his bride. A benchmark of Turkish cinema, this is a visceral, innovatively shot and vibrantly acted depiction of the horrors of greed.

Forum members rate this film 9/10

 

Discuss the film and Blu-ray here   


PICTURE

Metin Erksanís Dry Summer, the fourth film in Criterionís first World Cinema Project box set, is presented in a new dual-format edition and is presented in its original aspect ratio of about 1.37:1. The high-definition 1080p/24hz transfer is delivered on a dual-layer Blu-ray disc (which it shares with A River Called Titas) while the standard-definition version presents the film on its own dual-layer DVD by itself. The transfer on the DVD has not been window-boxed.

Similar to the other films on the set the presentation for Dry Summer is marvelous. There are a few minor blemishes in the source, the restoration work obviously being thorough. But the digital transfer itself presents no notable flaws, delivers a high amount of detail, excellent depth, sharp contrast, and distinct grey levels. Edges are clean, with no noticeable artifacts, and it delivers natural looking film grain.

The DVDís transfer also delivers a decent standard-definition presentation of the same transfer. Compression is a little more noticeable and there are some obvious shimmering effects in a few tight patterns but as a whole itís very clean and upscaled it looks very good.

I have nothing to really complain about with this one. Itís sharp, is in great shape, and looks spectacular overall. Another great transfer in this impressive box set.

9/10

All Blu-ray screen captures come from the source disc and have been shrunk from 1920x1080 to 900x506 and slightly compressed to conserve space. While they are not exact representations they should offer a general idea of overall video quality.

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AUDIO

The film receives a 1.0 mono track, presented in lossless linear PCM on the Blu-ray and Dolby Digital on the DVD.

As the film begins the sound effects sound pleasant enough. They come off a bit flat but theyíre clean and acceptable and I was prepared for a generally good mono track. And then the characters start talking. Itís more than likely a product of shooting conditions and audio equipment but I found dialogue unusually edgy and distorted. Eventually I did get used to it and was able to overlook it, but it was a bit of a shock initially.

5/10

SUPPLEMENTS

Each film in the set gets its own set of supplements. Like every other film in the set, the film gets an introduction by Martin Scorsese. Running 2-minutes he just talks a little about the film and points out the aspects he admires.

Criterion also includes a 15-minute segment featuring an interview with filmmakers Metin Erksan and Faith Akin, with Erksanís taken from excerpts of a 2008 interview, and Adkinís being recorded exclusively for this release. Akin recalls winning the Golden Bear for Head-On, technically a German film, though Turkey considered it one of their own. This led Akin to track down Dry Summer, the first Turkish film to win the award. Akin talks a little about the political climate in Turkey at the time, comments on Erksanís style, his favourite moments in the film, the sexuality, and so on. This is intercut with Erksanís comments where he recalls making the film and some obstacles that came up, like the censors who objected to a plot point which would have involved the older brother marrying the widow. He has some unkind (rather humourous) comments about those ďuseless peopleĒ who only know how to ďget their salaries.Ē Akin provides some decent insight but I actually wish there was more footage of Erksan who proves to be a rather lively interview subject.

Again, Iím disappointed there isnít a bit more, and I still wish Criterion included some more information on these restorations. The interviews do add a little bit of value.

4/10

CLOSING

Like the other films in the set, Dry Summer is sparse on supplements but delivers one incredible digital transfer. Another fantastic presentation in the set.


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