Home Page  
 
 

SPECIFICATIONS
  • 2.35:1 Anamorphic Widescreen
  • English DTS-HD 2.0 Stereo
  • English subtitles
  • 1 Disc
FEATURES
  • None

Jubal

Blu-ray
Reviewed by: Chris Galloway

Directed By: Delmer Daves
Starring: Glenn Ford, Ernest Borgnine, Rod Steiger, Valerie French, Felicia Farr, Basil Ruysdael, Noah Beery Jr., Charles Bronson
1956 | 100 Minutes | Licensor: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment

Release Information
Blu-ray | MSRP: $29.95 | Series: The Criterion Collection | Edition: #656
RLJ Entertainment

Release Date: May 14, 2013
Review Date: May 12, 2013

Purchase From:
amazon.com  amazon.ca

Share:

SYNOPSIS

A trio of exceptional performances from Glenn Ford, Ernest Borgnine, and Rod Steiger form the center of Jubal, an overlooked Hollywood treasure from genre master Delmer Daves. In this Shakespearean tale of jealousy and betrayal, Ford is an honorable itinerant cattleman, befriended and hired by Borgnine's bighearted ranch owner despite his unwillingness to talk about his past. When the new hand becomes the target of the flirtatious attentions of the owner's bored wife (Valerie French) and is entrusted by the boss with a foreman's responsibilities, his presence at the ranch starts to rankle his shifty fellow cowhand, played by Steiger. The resulting emotional showdown imparts unparalleled psychology intensity to this western, a vivid melodrama featuring expressive location photography in Technicolor and CinemaScope.

Forum members rate this film 8/10

 

Discuss the film and Blu-ray here   


PICTURE

Delmer Davesí Jubal receives a Criterion Blu-ray edition that presents the film in its original aspect ratio of about 2.55:1 on a single-layer disc. The new high-definition transfer, taken from a 4K scan of the original 35mm negative, is presented in 1080p/24hz.

The release as a whole feels like an unfortunate afterthought, as if Sony or Criterion were just trying to get the film out on Blu-ray as quickly as possible, which is a shame since the film does deserve more attention. But the presentation thankfully doesnít reflect that attitude. Restored and mastered by Grover Crisp for Sony, the film, in all of its Technicolor/CinemaScope glory, looks wonderful on the high-def format. Some sequences can look a little hot and blown out a bit but in general the colours look to be accurately rendered, retaining the filmís Technicolor look. Blacks are fairly deep but some details are lost in the shadows and crushing is apparent.

The image is crisp with clean edges, though the finer details in the image never really pop while long shots and transitions can look a bit fuzzy all around. The filmís grain structure remains and is fairly clean in its rendering except in some darker scenes where it looks somewhat pixilated and noisy. Past this there are no other artifacts that were apparent

The restoration is also very impressive as I donít recall many blemishes other than a spec of debris in a few places and some noticeable damage in some of the transitions between scenes. In all, despite the barebones, almost bargain-bin nature of the whole release, the video presentation is stellar.

8/10

All Blu-ray screen captures come from the source disc and have been shrunk from 1920x1080 to 900x506 and slightly compressed to conserve space. While they are not exact representations they should offer a general idea of overall video quality.

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

AUDIO

The filmís audio is delivered on a lossless linear PCM 2.0 stereo track. The audio is clean, free of distortion, and fills out the sound field nicely, specifically in its delivery of music. Dialogue is clear and the music has some fabulous range and depth despite its age. Impressive overall.

7/10

SUPPLEMENTS

This area is where the release is most shocking. Since this is licenced from a major studio (Sony Pictures) youíd almost think Criterion would throw on at least a couple of supplements. Alas there are no disc supplements at all, with Criterionís companion release, 3:10 to Yuma, containing supplements that mention Jubal. All this title gets is an 18-page booklet featuring a decent essay by Kent Jones on Davesí career and the film. A big, surprising letdown.

1/10

CLOSING

Itís unfortunate Criterion didnít see it as worthwhile to throw any supplements onto the package, delivering a barebones release for a film (and director) that deserves more attention. Thankfully the title is at Criterionís lower price point and packs a great audio/visual presentation, making the release worthwhile for admirers and fans to pick up.


View packaging for this Blu-ray

Share: 



Purchase From:
amazon.com  amazon.ca  




Join our Facebook Group (requires Facebook account)

This site is not affiliated with The Criterion Collection