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SPECIFICATIONS
  • 1.85:1 Anamorphic Widescreen
  • English DTS-HD 5.1 Surround
  • English subtitles
  • 2 Discs
FEATURES
  • Both 2D and 3D versions
  • Audio commentary featuring Wenders
  • The Making of "Pina" (available in 3D)
  • Deleted scenes with commentary by Wenders (available in 3D)
  • Behind-the-scenes footage
  • Interview with Wenders
  • Trailer
  • English subtitle translation

Pina

Blu-ray
Reviewed by: Chris Galloway

Directed By: Wim Wenders
2011 | 103 Minutes | Licensor: Sundance Selects

Release Information
Blu-ray | MSRP: $49.95 | Series: The Criterion Collection | Edition: #644
RLJ Entertainment

Release Date: January 22, 2013
Review Date: February 21, 2013

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SYNOPSIS

The boundless imagination and physical marvels of the work of the German modern-dance pioneer Pina Bausch leap off the screen in this exuberant tribute by Wim Wenders. A long-planned film collaboration between the director and the choreographer was in preproduction when Bausch died in 2009. Two years later, Wenders decided to go ahead with the project, reconceiving it as an homage to his late friend. The result, shot in stunning 3D, is a remarkable visual experience and a vivid representation of Bausch's art, enacted by a group of staggeringly talented dancers from her company, the Tanztheater Wuppertal. Pina is an adventurous work of cinema that highlights the bold legacy of one of the world's true creative visionaries.

Forum members rate this film 7/10

 

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PICTURE

The Criterion Collection presents Wim Wendersí Pina on Blu-ray and Blu-ray 3D in its original aspect ratio of 1.85:1 on this two-disc set. The 2D version appears on the first dual-layer disc while the 3D version appears on the second dual-layer disc. This marks Criterionís first 3D release. I do not own a 3D capable television so this review will only pertain to the 2D version, the transfer of which is delivered in 1080p/24hz. The notes mention that the 2D version was constructed using footage from either the ďleftĒ and ďrightĒ camera of the 3D rig, depending on which presented the better composition.

Iím admittedly not a big fan of 3D (I usually leave a viewing with a mild to moderate headache) but after viewing the 2D versionís transfer this may be the one time I regret not having a 3D television. Even in 2D there is an incredible sense of depth here. Shot in high-definition the digital presentation carries over rather well to Blu-ray. There is of course no print damage to speak of since the source is digital, so thatís never concern, and other than some minor noise (a little heavier and noticeable in a few exterior sequences) and maybe some scenes that look a bit blown out (though this could be intentional) the transfer does look very good. There is a high level of detail always present and everything, from grains of sand to leaves of grass to beads of sweat, is clearly defined. Colours are bold and vivid, with perfectly rendered reds and greens.

Overall itís an impressive looking presentation, maybe only hampered in a few places by the technology, but it delivers excellent colours, details, and depth in its 2D presentation, and Iím looking forward to seeing it in 3D at some point in the future.

8/10

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AUDIO

Criterion presents a lossless DTS-HD MA 5.1 surround track. The track is made up primarily of music and it richly fills the environment, moving around the viewer. The music is crisp and pure, sounding as though the performers/orchestra is right there with you. There is very little dialogue in the film, limited to voice overs of some of the performers talking about Pina and/or her work, but itís also clear and rich. Nothing big or showy, but itís more than effective.

9/10

SUPPLEMENTS

Pina comes with some material, most of it worthwhile, some of it repetitive. Probably the best supplement to be included here is an audio commentary featuring director Wim Wenders. Wenders gets into the technical details of the film, specifically the 3D and why he used it and the challenges it presented, which is all well and good. He talks about the performers and performances but the track is probably best when he talks about Pina Bausch and her work, which he does throughout the various performances. As usual Wenders has no trouble holding oneís attention and delivers a worthwhile and entertaining track, offering a great primer on Bausch and her work. The commentary is also included with the 3D version of the film.

Giving us a more technical look at the film is the 45-minute The Making of Pina, which is apparently presented in 3D on the second disc. The doc, broken down into chapters, looks at the set-up and presentation of Bauschís work. It then looks into the use of the 3D cameras and interestingly also presents some test footage and the problems that had to be worked out. I was also fascinated in the tests around the placement and movements of the cameras. Sadly I didnít get the full effect of the 3D tests since I only viewed the 2D version (again, I do not own a 3D television) but I still found this a rather enlightening making-of feature.

Criterion also includes 14 deleted scenes, running about 36-minutes. Vexingly you canít ďplay allĒ and must go through each one individually, even more annoying if you want to listen to the optional commentary by Wenders as you have to switch the audio each time you play. The sequences are deleted sequences from some of the performances and Wenders talks a little about each segment, how it may have fit in the film and why it was cut, primarily timing and flow by the sounds of it. These scenes are also presented in 3D on the second disc.

We then get 8-minutesí worth of behind-the-scenes footage showing how certain scenes were shot, though this was pretty much covered in the documentary. There is then a 22-minute interview with Wim Wenders that was recorded during a press junket for the film by the looks of it; Wenders talks about 3D, Bausch, and shooting the film, repeating a lot of material found in the other supplements. The disc then closes with the American trailer for the film.

The booklet starts with a brief tribute by Wenders to Pina Bausch, which he said at the memorial service for her in 2009. Siri Hustvedt writes an essay about Pina Bausch and Wendersí film and Criterion then includes quotes made by Bausch in 2007. The booklet then finishes with a listing of the dances presented in the film, a gallery of the performers that appear in the film, and another tribute by Wenders.

Iím surprised by the lack of more material about Bausch in particular, though Iím guessing since Wenders wanted the film to concentrate on Bauschís work and not necessarily her he may have wanted the same thing for the supplements. And though a couple of supplements do repeat information found elsewhere in the set I still found the technical elements within them wholly fascinating.

7/10

CLOSING

It leaves a bit to be desired for supplements but the presentation (at least the 2D one) is stellar. A definite recommendation for those interested in Bauschís work or the film.


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