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SPECIFICATIONS
  • 1.33:1 Standard
  • Spanish Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono
  • Spanish PCM Mono
  • English subtitles
  • 3 Discs
FEATURES
  • Introduction by Martin Scorsese
  • Visual essay by filmmaker and critic Kent Jones

Redes

Dual-Format Edition
Reviewed by: Chris Galloway

Directed By: , Fred Zinnemann
1936 | 59 Minutes | Licensor: World Cinema Project

Release Information
Blu-ray | MSRP: $124.95 | Series: The Criterion Collection | Edition: #686
RLJ Entertainment

Release Date: December 10, 2013
Review Date: December 8, 2013

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SYNOPSIS

Early in his career, the Austrian-born future Oscar winner Fred Zinnemann codirected with Emilio Go?mez Muriel the politically and emotionally searing Redes. In this vivid, documentary-like dramatization of the daily grind of men struggling to make a living by fishing on the Gulf of Mexico (mostly played by real- life fishermen), one worker's terrible loss instigates a political awakening among him and his fellow laborers. A singular coming together of talents, Redes, commissioned by a progressive Mexican government, was cowritten and gorgeously shot by the legendary photographer Paul Strand.

Discuss the film and Blu-ray here   


PICTURE

The second title in Criterionís first World Cinema Project box set, Emilio Gomez Murielís and Fred Zinnemannís Redes gets a dual-format release, presented in its original aspect ratio of about 1.33:1. The Blu-ray version shares a dual-layer disc with Touki-Bouki and gets a new 1080p/24hz high-definition transfer. The DVD version receives its own single-layer disc. This transfer has not been window-boxed.

Of the six films it should be unsurprising that this film, made in 1936, is the roughest looking one, but in no way is the transfer any less impressive than the other transfers in the set. The source, a duplicate negative (the original negative is long gone) is littered with scratches, primarily fine ones with a few larger ones scattered about, and they rain through constantly. Pulsating, stain remnants, tram lines, and missing frames are also an issue.

Despite all of these leftovers, though, the restoration is still impressive. I suspect damage was far heavier than what we get here and large, glaring issues (other than the missing frames and few larger blemishes that couldnít be helped) are few and far between. Thankfully the image wasnít softened at all to hide the finer scratches, and this allows for an incredibly sharp image. Detail is high, whether close-ups or long shots, with clearly defined edges and perfectly rendered film grain.

The DVDís transfer uses the same high-definition transfer and I must say I was rather impressed. Itís not as crisp as the Blu-rayís transfer but upscaled it still comes off fairly staggering. Compression is minimal (though the filmís scratches and stains may distract from that) and I couldnít detect any other artifacts. It looks very good.

Considering the filmís age and its near-forgotten status the presentation is a real surprise. Its source still shows its age but the transfer delivers as crisp and clean an image beyond what many would expect.

7/10

All Blu-ray screen captures come from the source disc and have been shrunk from 1920x1080 to 900x506 and slightly compressed to conserve space. While they are not exact representations they should offer a general idea of overall video quality.

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AUDIO

The audio has unfortunately held up far worse than the picture. The track is flat and fairly distorted. Audio drops on occasion and thereís still some noticeable background noise. Thereís also a few moments where the audio completely hollows out during a shot and becomes awfully muffled. The transfer itself does what it can, and manages to keep it mostly clean and free of damage. Unfortunately the source materials are too problematic and Iím sure this is about as good as it gets.

4/10

SUPPLEMENTS

Each film in the set receives its own set of supplements. Martin Scorsese offers an introduction to the film (and all of the films in the set) running about 3-minutes. He talks about his first impressions of it and his amazement at how it shares a lot in terms of style with neo-realism, despite pre-dating neo-realism by a couple of decades. Kent Jones also offers a brief 8-minute visual essay about the film. It covers its production history and how everyone became involved on the project. It also offers some information on its release and restoration.

Unfortunately there isnít much here, and Iím still saddened there isnít more information on all of these restorations. Still, Jonesí essay is a nice, if short, addition.

4/10

CLOSING

Supplements are almost non-existent but Redes, despite the poor condition of its materials, receives one hell of a transfer in this excellent box set.


View packaging for this Blu-ray

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