772 Blind Chance

Discuss DVDs and Blu-rays released by Criterion and the films on them. If it's got a spine number, it's in here. Threads may contain spoilers.
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swo17
Joined: Tue Apr 15, 2008 10:25 am
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772 Blind Chance

#1 Post by swo17 » Tue Jun 16, 2015 5:16 pm

Blind Chance

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Before he stunned the cinematic world with the epic The Decalogue and the Three Colors trilogy, the great Polish filmmaker Krzysztof Kieślowski made his first work of metaphysical genius, Blind Chance, a compelling drama about the difficulty of reconciling political ideals with personal happiness. This unforgettable film follows Witek (a magnetic Boguslaw Linda), a medical student with an uncertain future in Communist Poland; Kieślowski dramatizes Witek's journey as a series of different possibilities, suggesting that chance rules our lives as much as choice. First suppressed and then censored by the Polish government, Blind Chance is here presented in its complete original form.

SPECIAL FEATURES

• New 4K digital restoration of the original uncensored film, approved by cinematographer Krzysztof Pakulski, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
• New interview with Polish film critic Tadeusz Sobolewski
• Interview with director Agnieszka Holland from 2003
• Nine sections from the film originally censored by the Central Film Board in Poland
• PLUS: An essay by film critic Dennis Lim and a 1993 interview about the film with director Krzysztof Kieślowski

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captveg
Joined: Wed Sep 02, 2009 7:28 pm

Re: 772 Blind Chance

#2 Post by captveg » Tue Jun 16, 2015 5:26 pm

Interesting that they're going with the production year rather than the eventual release year of 1987 after its suppression. They did the opposite with Ivan the Terrible Part II back in the day.

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swo17
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Re: 772 Blind Chance

#3 Post by swo17 » Tue Jun 16, 2015 5:32 pm

I suppose this explains the Kino Kieślowski set going OOP a while back.

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knives
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 6:49 pm

Re: 772 Blind Chance

#4 Post by knives » Tue Jun 16, 2015 5:38 pm

I wish they had included a few more shorts on the disc.

artfilmfan
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 9:11 pm

Re: 772 Blind Chance

#5 Post by artfilmfan » Tue Jun 16, 2015 6:52 pm

Nice to see Criterion releasing this and with a 4K restoration. I hope someday they'll release No End also.

jp4151
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2011 12:03 pm

Re: 772 Blind Chance

#6 Post by jp4151 » Tue Jun 16, 2015 7:58 pm

I saw this uncensored version at Los Angeles County Museum last August. It looked great. I noticed a few additions here and there, the most obvious one being an extended moment of the main character getting attacked by security guards on the train. At one point in this very brief sequence, the image freezes and text appears on screen stating that this censored shot could not be found, but the soundtrack does continue to the end of the scene. I wonder if Criterion will present it this way as well.

Oh, and that night was a double feature with "A Short Film about Killing", also newly restored. Here's hoping Criterion will release that too, but as a supplement to the complete Decalogue set that I've been dreaming about for years.

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britcom68
Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 7:53 am

Re: 772 Blind Chance

#7 Post by britcom68 » Sat Jul 18, 2015 9:13 pm

Does anyone have the details yet where the interview with Agnieszka Holland is coming to us from- besides the year 2003?
It would be interesting to see if Criterion finally steps up and releases Europa Europa. [-o<

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warren oates
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Re: 772 Blind Chance

#8 Post by warren oates » Sun Jul 19, 2015 1:33 am

Though I'd rather see her underrated follow-up to that Olivier, Olivier.

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britcom68
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Re: 772 Blind Chance

#9 Post by britcom68 » Sun Jul 19, 2015 3:51 pm

warren oates wrote:Though I'd rather see her underrated follow-up to that Olivier, Olivier.
I agree, it is overlooked and shouldn't be. In the past decade we have had two films I had high hopes for in a similar mold, "Birth" and Eastwood's The Changeling but neither of those films succeeds when then should. "Birth" would have worked much better if the child had been younger, making the story more psychologically complex and making the deception a greater loss for Kidman's character. The thing about "Birth" that got me is that it reminds me of the anecdote about why Hitchcock abandoned his post-Marnie project, "The Three Hostages." Because you can't expect to put something psychologically non-traditional, in his case it was hypnotism, and expect the viewers to go along with it completely as the key plot point. For "Birth," it was expecting the viewers to believe reincarnation is a possibility the grown adult characters could be persuaded to accept, especially from an unknown child.

For Eastwoods Changeling the issue was focusing so much on the many struggles from the single mother and not on why a child would want to change places with another child or knowingly contribute to abuse upfront. Waiting until the story progresses into the courtroom/police investigation to find out about the child's past is a cheat for me, it puts the adult characters in the dominating exposition role and we don't have the chance to try and see the story from the child's perspective told from themselves until we have figured out the story for ourselves.

Olivier, Olivier is still a great ride even today,mostly because we know that this cannot be the same child physically, but we are left wondering if it is possible he truly wanted to change places emotionally and even see those around him in the surrogate family who are knowingly accepting a doppelganger on that level. Europa Europa has moments like that too, but I do not like that Holland film as much. I can't stop thinking while I am watching "Europa" how much of this was true, how much is exaggerated and what is purely invention. That is why Holland's Olivier, Olivier works better for me, it allows room for the more unusual responses from the characters since they are not actually based on real historical figures. It was no surprise to see Holland get involved with last year's TV adaptation of "Rosemary's Baby," I think her "Olivier" is the best film I could recommend in the genre of children-changing places that has no true demonic overtones/characters yet still has great psychological tension.

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warren oates
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Re: 772 Blind Chance

#10 Post by warren oates » Sun Jul 19, 2015 4:48 pm

You might want to check out that documentary called The Imposter too.

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dadaistnun
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Re: 772 Blind Chance

#11 Post by dadaistnun » Tue Aug 25, 2015 3:43 pm


criterion10
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Re: 772 Blind Chance

#12 Post by criterion10 » Tue Aug 25, 2015 3:49 pm

Man, is that one barebones release!

Anyway, it does look gorgeous, so there's that.

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manicsounds
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Re: 772 Blind Chance

#13 Post by manicsounds » Fri Sep 04, 2015 1:52 am


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TMDaines
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Re: 772 Blind Chance

#14 Post by TMDaines » Fri Sep 04, 2015 3:28 am

criterion10 wrote:Man, is that one barebones release!

Anyway, it does look gorgeous, so there's that.
It has three extras and a booklet?!

McNulty
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Re: 772 Blind Chance

#15 Post by McNulty » Mon Jan 04, 2016 9:21 pm

While watching this in a sleepy daze last night, I noticed a dropped frame at 01:29:22. Anyone notice this? I wonder if this is due to the source material, or just a slip-up on Criterion's part. Code Unknown (another Kino acquired title) has similar issues.

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JeffreySchroeck
Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2014 9:29 am

Re: 772 Blind Chance

#16 Post by JeffreySchroeck » Tue Jan 05, 2016 9:22 am

artfilmfan wrote:Nice to see Criterion releasing this and with a 4K restoration. I hope someday they'll release No End also.
I try to not hold the quality of the version I'm seeing against the film, but this restoration versus the Kino DVD is such an improvement that it almost felt like a different film. Hopefully we get one or two more from that set this year.

On the negative side, that autopsy cadaver's belly fat in glorious HD is even more disgusting than ever.

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movielocke
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Re: 772 Blind Chance

#17 Post by movielocke » Tue Feb 02, 2016 4:33 am

About one hour in, I was thinking to myself how disappointed I was, I'd never been let down by a Kieslowski film before. Then the film shifts. Click. the whole experience was suddenly transformed and I was completely in love with the film, like all the other Kieslowski films. For me, at least, his films have a way of sneaking up on me, where I'm going along with the film, enjoying it, and then suddenly I'm profoundly moved and involved, my viewing goes from cruising to deeply introspective and meditative. It's a glorious feeling, every time it happens, and it happened for each of the four other Kieslowski features and the big one (the miniseries).

By the end of the film, I was as profoundly moved and affected as I was the first time I saw the Double Life of Veronique. This is a masterpiece on par, with that one, Kieslowski's best, imo. I'm blown away and still collecting my thoughts.

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knives
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Re: 772 Blind Chance

#18 Post by knives » Fri Sep 07, 2018 4:57 pm

Converse to the above I haven't really been on for Keislowki in the past (though Red and Blue are good for me), but the first story here worked for me fantastically. There's a good sense of humour and drama throughout being both very specific to Poland and its politics and making sense across the whole landscape of cold war politics. Even his various camera tricks, such as the POV play at the beginning, make sense to the themes and characters expanding the sense of both and bleeding them into each other. It actually reminded me a lot of late '60s Godard particularly A Married Woman and 2 or 3 Things. The film throughout this dense first story is intensely repetitive in that Kieslowski way, but with a fair amount of subtlety that sort of renders the whole film's structure obsolete ironically enough. The other two stories are nice, but aren't given enough time to flesh out on their own and this become totally dependent on the first which works well for some themes and repetitions, but never becomes engaging in their own right. As powerful as the last shot is and how dependent it is upon the structure of the whole film I was still left wondering what did it add.

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