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 Post subject: Re: Synapse Films
PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2017 6:30 pm 

Joined: Sat May 10, 2008 1:10 pm
Drucker wrote:
David Mackenzie confirmed on Facebook he will be encoding this.

I'm doing all the Synapse titles right now :)


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 Post subject: Re: Synapse Films
PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2017 6:37 pm 
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David M. wrote:
I'm doing all the Synapse titles right now :)

So, three or four titles a year. :P Seriously though, hope that is still the case whenever they get around to Lemora.


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 Post subject: Re: Synapse Films
PostPosted: Sat Aug 26, 2017 2:59 am 

Joined: Tue Nov 22, 2011 1:48 am
Did the person who created that cover think this was a Jean Rollin film?


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 Post subject: Re: Synapse Films
PostPosted: Sat Aug 26, 2017 4:30 am 
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David M. wrote:
Drucker wrote:
David Mackenzie confirmed on Facebook he will be encoding this.

I'm doing all the Synapse titles right now :)


Were you responsible for Tenebre? If so, bravo!


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 Post subject: Re: Synapse Films
PostPosted: Mon Aug 28, 2017 9:30 pm 
Dot Com Dom
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This cover was briefly available as a limited extra slipcase from something called Hi Def Ninja, it should have been the regular cover:

Image


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 28, 2017 11:07 pm 
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I don't really care for that cover much, either, but I think it is an improvement.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 29, 2017 1:50 am 

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It at least has recognizable motifs from the film, though the twist on Catholic imagery doesn't really relate to the film. The final Synapse art is so disconnected from the film it would be impossible to identify it as a poster for Suspiria if the title were removed.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 31, 2017 2:40 am 
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Umbrella confirmed on FB that they are going to release the 4k restoration in Australia on 1 November.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 31, 2017 4:30 am 
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Sure, but which one? The German and Italian releases are a different 4K restoration (or at least different colour timing) to the Synapse, aren't they? Wouldn't it just be the same as those?


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 31, 2017 5:33 am 
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It is. Nothing to do with the Synapse restoration.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 3:09 am 

Joined: Mon Apr 17, 2017 5:31 pm
According to DVD beaver the transfer for the standalone release of phenomena is different and perhaps even inferior to the steelbook edition?


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 4:44 am 
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Robespierre wrote:
According to DVD beaver the transfer for the standalone release of phenomena is different and perhaps even inferior to the steelbook edition?

I initially read DVD Beaver's statement the same way and it confused me. It didn't make sense that they would use different transfers, especially an inferior one. So, I went back and read the Synapse Films entries for the two Phenomena releases. Both editions state that they are 1080p High-Definition 1.66:1 presentations and neither mention a 4K restoration.
DVD Beaver wrote:
Synapse states on their website "This release of PHENOMENA is NOT the same as our previously released Steelbook edition."

This is true, the two editions are not the same. However, Synapse goes on to list the differences: "This release is in standard Blu-ray packaging (not the collectible Steelbook packaging) and it does not contain the limited edition remastered soundtrack CD, or the booklet."
So, it appears that the transfers are the same between the two different Synapse releases, after all.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 5:09 am 
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It's the same on-disc content. The only Argento-related steelbooks they've released where they've altered the BD/DVD content were the two Demons films.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 12:01 pm 
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Cult Films on Facebook:
Quote:
SUSPIRIA...like you've never experienced it!

CultFilms is honoured to present the 4K restored version of Dario Argento’s horror masterpiece SUSPIRIA!

We will distribute our 4K restoration of SUSPIRIA – made under the watchful eye of Dario Argento - on UHD, Blu-ray, DVD, VOD, and in cinemas…and orchestrate the ‘UK Tour of Suspiria 4K’, which we are coordinating with several venues across the country next month.

Our SUSPIRIA tour is due to conclude with a very special event in London: an evening with Dario Argento, featuring a Q&A with the maestro himself and a presentation of the film.

The restoration has also been selected to screen in the prestigious Cult strand of this year’s BFI London Film Festival.
CultFilms specialises in distributing the finest art-house world cinema and the best cult classics. Born from the fusion of Nouveaux Pictures and Argent Films, two long standing pioneering world cinema labels established in the 90s, with over a quarter century of curating experience, CultFilms specialises in restoring and releasing renowned classics and little known gems to discerning audiences on Blu-ray, DVD, VOD, television, and in cinemas.

In 2016 we presented, along with Italian partners, the 4K restoration of THE BATTLE OF ALGIERS at the Venice Film Festival where the film had originally won the Golden Lion. The 4K exhibition of THE BATTLE OF ALGIERS will launch next month at the Barbican in London, followed by screenings across the country. The film will be released as physical media from its 4K source as a hardback bound ‘media-book’. This special CultFilms edition will feature essays and unique period photographs.

We will shortly announce our future 4K restoration plans … so keep an eye out for more thrills!


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 1:59 pm 
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Also nothing to do with the Synapse restoration.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 2:22 pm 
Dot Com Dom
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I understand the logic of Finch linking to an alternative to a $50 release (and more than that for non-US customers), but after all the work Synapse has done on this title, I can't imagine not going for the premium version if you want to own the film


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 2:26 pm 
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Merely posted it for those who can't afford the Synapse for whichever reasons. That doesn't include me necessarily.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 2:36 pm 
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And to be clear: there are two different restorations of this film, right?


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 3:04 pm 
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Yes, while they are from the same scan of the negative,they are different, with Synapse's work exclusive to their release.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 3:08 pm 
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My understanding is that the Synapse resto is from the OCN whereas the TLE resto is not, and that they have the opportunity to fix the black levels and some blown out whites that didn't get addressed in the TLE restoration.

TLE restoration review

Quote from a review of the TLE resto:
Quote:
Torsten Kaiser and TLE Films did the restoration for this German release. Their foundation was the already processed HD master and not the original camera negative that Synapse has, but they have definitely worked wonders on it in terms of colour saturation and contrast. Some of the older discrepancies, such as blown-out shots during the film’s lightning-stricken and fiery finale, remain that way ... though I hardly find this to be an issue.They used 35mm IB Tech Prints stored at the BFI as references for the colour timing, making sure, shot for shot, that the corrections were as close as was technically possible to the original 35mm Technicolor materials that were seen in theatres during the period when Suspiria was made and released. The release boasts a gorgeously illustrated digibook and featurettes on the restoration that look extensively at this undertaking and the processes used to transfer the film. Sadly they are all in German, but I have absolutely no doubt that they did the best they could with the materials they had.The results, to my eyes, are highly impressive, but still some way short of the grand spectacular we have all been praying for.

Print damage is still in evidence. We have some flecks and blue spots and darts, together with wobbles here and there – the optical effect of Elena Markos’ silhouette during the climax, for example. Indeed, the entire explosive finale has always been something of a bugbear.Definition and clarity are compromised in certain shots and wear and tear keeps intruding. Although I believe some work has been done to compensate for this, the new transfer still exhibits an obvious decline in picture quality during Suzy’s fight-back and escape. In fact, I even noticed a quite severe amount of horizontal flecks spearing across her eventual stride away from the burning academy. More, I would say, than previously witnessed.As an aside, this version features the English titles and not the original Italian ones seen on the Nouveax release.

Grain structure is certainly better than the UK disc, which had a tendency to proffer up some waxy faces, cruel courtesy of DNR. Though the HD master still betrays some of this, the image here definitely has a more faithful and natural looking texture. However, this is slightly let down with the inclusion of some edge enhancement that I found mired the daylight meeting between Jessica Harper, Udo Kier and Rudolph Shundler. I did not find this element to be noticeable during the extensive interior shots, but this is still an element that shouldn’t have occurred.

Another area of concern returns with the highlights that are still blown out, though to a lesser degree than previously, I am pleased to report. The scene of Suzy in Olga’s apartment was a good early example of this, with the daylight meeting and the finale also suffering. Well, they all still do, but nowhere near as obviously, nor as damagingly. Contrast is appreciably better and more smoothly consistent. The UK transfer was positively scorched-out at times, but this holds the contrast in check much more firmly. The brightness elsewhere, such as in that wonderful shot of the spear of light reflected at Suzy by Franca Scagnetti’s ogreish nursemaid in the corridor and that fabulous moat of shimmering dust that it produces, still look wonderful. The detail of the dancing, glittering particles is much sharper and spectral, too.

But the startling palette – so often like waves of sunlight shining through a stained-glass window – is where this movie comes alive and is certainly something that this release is able to stand tall and proud about delivering. Finding the correct hues and tones, via an intensive dye process, was essential to the success of this project. Now, as I’ve stated before, I have indeed seen a theatrical presentation of Suspiria, as well as pretty much every new home video release that has come along. Yet, there is no way that I am going to state, categorically, that I know definitively how it should look. But I believe the people behind this transfer when they state they have been as accurate as it is possible to be when displaying the film at its intense and gaudy best.
The blues are hypnotically lush, the reds colossally deep and vibrant. The orange and green elements soothe and pulse. The wonderful shot of Suzy moving down the secret passageway, with the gold and black text decorating the walls around her is positively striking. And, considering the vast swathes of deep primaries plastered across the image, it is remarkable how consistent they are, and free from any horribly obvious smearing, banding or bleeding, although some very minor occurrences do faintly push. On the UK release the Academy became a horrible gaudy pink! And the blood was a lot pinker than it should have been, and some lips, especially Madame Blanc's, literally seemed to pop - in livid pink - from the screen. Hmmm ... there was a whole of lot of pink going on. All the colours had been boosted, though not to the nauseous levels found on the infamous Italian BD. Most of this seems to have been rectified. The pink push has now retreated, with a much more sublime slide through the red scale that may be luxurious and hyper-real, but is never off-putting or ridiculous.

Black levels are, for the most part, very good. The epic shadows in the stone square, the thick canopy in the Black Forest, lit by headlights and rainfall are thick and deadly. But there were still several occasions when the shadows seemed to lose integrity and filter through with grainy grey, which is almost certainly a product of the source. But, on the whole, they appeared strong and lend enormous depth and atmosphere. The lurking, feral-eyed killer in the background of one pivotal shot can still be seen all too well - but then I was looking for him - and the outline of the murderer's head outside the window during the initial set-piece murder, even before we see his eyes, seems a little clearer and more obvious as well. This is what happens when hi-def comes to the home cinema, though. You will see things that weren’t intended. Such as Dario, himself, popping-up in a window reflection and wires and cables.

Now, I will go out on a limb and say that I believe definition is better than that seen on the UK disc. Facial detail – the capillaries in Jessica Harper’s gorgeous eyes, Rudolph Shundler’s burst blood vessels, spots and scars and wacky eyebrows – is extremely tightly resolved. Close-ups reveal more finite information with regards to maggots in the hair and crushed underfoot, detail in wallpaper and décor from balustrades, dressing tables, doors, windows, razor-wire and delicacies in open wounds and shredded flesh that trounce anything seen previously. Distant objects don't fare quite so well but, arguably, they never did. Yet, this image still manages to convey a greater level of detail in the architecture of the square in which Daniel is tormented by the witches' power, and within the tavern he visits just prior to his final walk home. Occasionally, edges of the frame soften and yield to the photographic distortion of the anamorphic lens - seen during some of the great panning shots - but this is par for the course.
Most middle-ground shots benefit from the improved clarity, though this has its downfalls too ... hence the plainly sight Dario’s head bobbing in and out of shot in the reflection in the window of the BMW Building. Detail bathed in the plethora of sumptuous hues also seems more immediately apparent, with less crushing taking place within the darker, deeper levels of saturation. Three-dimensionality is excellent. This is another acute area in which the image comes into its own. All those incredible tracking shots boast genuine depth and a spatial consistency that can't fail to draw you in. Moving down corridors, or panning across rooms and ornate fascias, Argento's imagery and DOP Luciano Tovoli’s framing is immaculate and this transfer holds true to that with better definition and an altogether deeper quality.

So, whilst this all looks very good indeed, there remains much work to be done to truly bring Suspiria to the glory we all know it can and should deliver. The improvements made with colour and contrast are enough to make me very happy, but there is also the appreciable new level of finite detail and the better overall image texture that are big new pluses. I have absolutely no doubt that Synapse will be able to provide a transfer that is much better again, given the OCN that they have to work with, so I know that I will be forking-out once more for this bonafide genre milestone ... and ladling yet more praise upon it in still more coverage.

But, for now, this is a terrific and highly rewarding stepping-stone, and one that I recommend to those fans who cannot wait for the US release."


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 3:24 pm 
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I could've sworn that Torsten Kaiser posted at the Blu-ray.com forum they used the same negative scan that Synapse used. There seems to be at least three "restorations/remasters": the one already on Blu-ray in the UK, the Italian/German one that came out earlier this year, and Synapse Film's.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 3:27 pm 
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Truth be told, Suspiria I've always liked but it's never been my favourite Argento and $50 + shipping for a SINGLE title, I'm not sure I can justify that, even if it comes with the movie's soundtrack CD. I know Synapse have to recoup their costs but when you figure the shipping costs in, it's probably too steep a price for a film I've always more admired than outright loved. Unless Synapse release a standard keepcase version down the line for a more agreeable price, I think I'm going to be happy with a "mere" second-best TLE resto release in the UK - if indeed the Synapse does turn out to be the truly best version of the film to get.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 3:31 pm 
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dwk wrote:
I could've sworn that Torsten Kaiser posted at the Blu-ray.com forum they used the same negative scan that Synapse used. There seems to be at least three "restorations/remasters": the one already on Blu-ray in the UK, the Italian/German one that came out earlier this year, and Synapse Film's.

From my understanding of what's been said on BR.com and the review I linked to, the TLE resto is more recent than what's been used for the 2010 UK release and by all accounts improves considerably on it though still not ideal. Please, anyone, feel free to correct me if need be; I've only read through the comments on BR and the one review of the German TLE 2017 release.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 5:48 pm 
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The older BRs should come from the FUBAR older restoration, the one with the funky color grading (made in 2007 IIRC).


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 9:53 pm 

Joined: Sat Nov 08, 2014 6:49 am
Even a Synapse affiliate said on the BR forums that the TLE restoration uses as a foundation the same 4k scan that Synapse 'commissionerd'.


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