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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2014 3:22 pm 
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EddieLarkin wrote:
The new one is a reboot and doesn't even have Warwick Davis in it

The first line of Wikipedia's entry is a wild ride:
Quote:
The Leprechaun returns in the horror reboot starring WWE wrestler Hornswoggle


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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2014 5:02 pm 
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First line? It's the only line! I've never seen "Hornswoggle" perform but if this means that the characters after his pot of gold will be punished with wrestling moves, I'm all in.


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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Wed Jun 25, 2014 9:55 pm 
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I have seen Hormswoggle perform and I am certain he doesn't know any wrestling moves.


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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Tue Jul 22, 2014 2:34 pm 
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It appears LionsGate have licensed some of the former Echo Bridge Miramax titles, as evidenced by pre-orders being up for the Faculty, the Prophecy collection, the Hellraiser collection, and the Children of the Corn collection


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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2014 4:04 pm 
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sigh
Quote:
On September 9, a collection of eight critically acclaimed French Nouvelle Vague films will be available on Digital HD* and On Demand for the first time ever in the United States from Lionsgate Home Entertainment. In addition to being available on Digital HD on iTunes, the films, with the exception of Darling, will also be available on DVD exclusively at Amazon.com. Featuring the work of legendary directors including Alain Resnais (Hiroshima Mon Amour), Jean-Pierre Melville (Les Enfants Terribles), Jacques Becker (Antoine et Antoinette), Jean-Luc Godard (Hail Mary) and Henri-Georges Clouzot (The Wages of Fear), and acting performances from the likes ofJean-Paul Belmondo (Pierrot le Fou), Jean Gabin (Inspector Maigret), Lino Ventura (Les Misérables, 1928), Jeanne Moreau (Viva Maria!), Anna Karina (A Woman Is A Woman), Simone Signoret (Ship of Fools), Jean-Pierre Cassel (The Diving Bell and the Butterfly) and more, each film is a must-have for any fan of foreign cinema. Pricing and title details available, please check your local cable or digital provider.

Last Year at Marienbad (1961)
Nominated for an Academy Award® for Best Writing, Story and Screenplay and directed by critically acclaimed director Alain Resnais (Hiroshima Mon Amour), Last Year at Marienbadtakes place in a luxury hotel in Europe where one resident becomes infatuated with a young woman and tries to persuade her that they had an affair the year before at Marienbad. The film, featuring costumes from iconic fashion designer Coco Chanel, received the Gold Lion at the Venice International Film Festival and the 1961 Prix Melies from the French Syndicate of Cinema Critics.

Army of Shadows (1969)
Jean-Pierre Melville (Les Enfants Terribles) directs a masterpiece about intrepid underground fighters who must grapple with their own brand of honor in their battle against Hitler's regime. Based on the book by Joseph Kessel, the film received awards from the Los Angeles Film Critics Association, the National Society of Film Critics and the New York Film Critics Circle.

Touchez Pas au Grisbi (1954)
BAFTA Film Awards nominee Jean Gabin (Inspector Maigret) stars as an aging gangster who is forced out of retirement when his best friend is kidnapped for ransom. Directed by Jacques Becker (Antoine et Antoinette), the film also stars Lino Ventura (Les Misérables, 1928) and Jeanne Moreau (Viva Maria!).

A Woman is a Woman (1961)
From the critically acclaimed director Jean-Luc Godard (Hail Mary) comes a classic story about an exotic dancer who is desperate to have a child with her lover, but when he refuses and turns her to his best friend, feelings become complicated. Winner of the Silver Bear Award at the Berlin International Film Festival, the film stars the award-winning Anna Karina (Band of Outsiders) and Jean-Paul Belmondo (Pierrot le Fou).

Le Trou (1960)
Directed by Jacques Becker (Antoine et Antoinette) and nominated for two BAFTA Film Awards, Le Trou is considered a masterpiece by the leader of the Nouvelle Vague movement, François Truffaut. Set in 1940s Paris, four prison cellmates plan an escape and induct a new inmate to join their plan... which eventually leads to betrayal.

Billy Liar (1963)
A six-time BAFTA Film Award nominee, Billy Liar stars Julie Christie (Fahrenheit 451) and Tom Courtenay (Doctor Zhivago) and was directed by Academy Award®-winning director John Schlesinger (Best Director, Midnight Cowboy, 1969). The critically acclaimed film tells the story of Billy Fisher, who lives with his parents and works for an undertaker. But in our hero's rich imagination, he is a military conqueror, a debonair playboy, a brilliant novelist and more. Problems arise when he gets his fantasies mixed up with reality.

Quai des Orfèvres (1947)
Directed by Henri-Georges Clouzot (The Wages of Fear) and starring Louis Jouvet (The Lower Depths) and Bernard Blier (Monsieur Gangster), the film tells the story of an ambitious singer, her pianist husband and their devoted friend who attempt to cover each other's tracks when a wealthy acquaintance is murdered.

Darling (1965)
Starring Julie Christie in her Academy Award®-winning role (Best Actress in a Leading Role, Darling, 1965) as a beautiful but amoral model who sleeps her way to the top of the London fashion scene at the height of the Swinging Sixties. The film also stars Dirk Bogarde (A Bridge Too Far) and Laurence Harvey (The Manchurian Candidate, 1962).

*Darling will be available via On Demand only.

PROGRAM INFORMATION

Year of Production:
Last Year At Marienbad: 1960
Army of Shadows: 1969
Touchez Pas au Grisbi: 1954
A Woman Is A Woman: 1961
Le Trou: 1960
Billy Liar: 1963
Quai des Orfèvres: 1947
Darling: 1965

Title Copyright:
Last Year At Marienbad:© 1960 STUDIOCANAL - Argos Films - Cineriz
Army of Shadows: © 1969 STUDIOCANAL - Fono Roma
Touchez Pas au Grisbi: © 1954 STUDIOCANAL - TF1 DA - Antares Films
A Woman Is A Woman: © 1961 STUDIOCANAL - Euro International Films S.p.A
Le Trou: © 1960 STUDIOCANAL - Magic Film S.P.A.
Billy Liar: © 1963 STUDIOCANAL FILMS Ltd
Quai des Orfèvres: © 1947 STUDIOCANAL
Darling: © 1965 STUDIOCANAL

Type: Digital Premiere

Rating: NR

Genre:
Last Year At Marienbad: Drama, Romance
Army of Shadows: Drama, War
Touchez Pas au Grisbi: Crime, Action, Drama, Thriller
A Woman Is A Woman: Comedy, Drama
Le Trou: Crime, Drama, Thriller
Billy Liar: Comedy, Romance
Quai des Orfèvres: Crime, Drama
Darling: Drama, Romance

Language: French
Last Year At Marienbad: French
Army of Shadows: French
Touchez Pas au Grisbi: French
A Woman Is A Woman: French
Le Trou: French
Billy Liar: English
Quai des Orfèvres: French
Darling: English

Closed Captioned:
Last Year At Marienbad: NA
Army of Shadows: NA
Touchez Pas au Grisbi: NA
A Woman Is A Woman: NA
Le Trou: NA
Billy Liar: English
Quai des Orfèvres: NA
Darling: English

Subtitles:
Last Year At Marienbad: English
Army of Shadows: English
Touchez Pas au Grisbi: English
A Woman Is A Woman: English
Le Trou: English
Billy Liar: NA
Quai des Orfèvres: English
Darling: NA

Feature Run Time:
Last Year At Marienbad: 94 minutes
Army of Shadows: 144 minutes
Touchez Pas au Grisbi: 96 minutes
A Woman Is A Woman: 83 Minutes
Le Trou: 131 minutes
Billy Liar: 99 minutes
Quai des Orfèvres: 103 minutes
Darling: 123 minutes

Format:
Last Year At Marienbad: Widescreen
Army of Shadows: Widescreen
Touchez Pas au Grisbi: Full Screen
A Woman Is A Woman: Widescreen
Le Trou: Widescreen
Billy Liar: Widescreen
Quai des Orfèvres: Full Screen
Darling: Widescreen
Audio Status: Mono


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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2014 4:07 pm 
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double sigh

Quote:
This product is manufactured on demand using DVD-R recordable media. Amazon.com's standard return policy will apply.


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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2014 4:10 pm 

Joined: Fri Mar 02, 2012 4:19 pm
Blech, I think I'm going to have a stroke.


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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2014 4:14 pm 
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I wonder if they sat on these titles for so long that their license might be up soon, and so it would no longer be worth it to put any effort whatsoever into these releases.


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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2014 4:18 pm 
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Le Trou spoiler warning:
Quote:
Le Trou (1960)
Directed by Jacques Becker (Antoine et Antoinette) and nominated for two BAFTA Film Awards, Le Trou is considered a masterpiece by the leader of the Nouvelle Vague movement, François Truffaut. Set in 1940s Paris, four prison cellmates plan an escape and induct a new inmate to join their plan... which eventually leads to betrayal.

It's silly to refer to one person as "the leader" of the French New Wave—and thanks for giving away the ending of this suspenseful film for those who haven't seen it yet. Keep up the great work, Lionsgate.


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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2014 4:20 pm 
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Gregory wrote:
Le Trou spoiler warning:
Quote:
Le Trou (1960)
Directed by Jacques Becker (Antoine et Antoinette) and nominated for two BAFTA Film Awards, Le Trou is considered a masterpiece by the leader of the Nouvelle Vague movement, François Truffaut. Set in 1940s Paris, four prison cellmates plan an escape and induct a new inmate to join their plan... which eventually leads to betrayal.

It's silly to refer to one person as "the leader" of the French New Wave—and thanks for giving away the ending of this suspenseful film for those who haven't seen it yet. Keep up the great work, Lionsgate.


Don't worry it only
[Reveal] Spoiler:
affects the last 3 minutes or so of the movie. You can certainly still enjoy the rest!


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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2014 4:24 pm 
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And they're claiming that these are "eight ... French Nouvelle Vague films"? Quai des Orfèvres, from 1947? Clouzot was pretty much excoriated by the New Wave.
Billy Liar for fuck's sake? Isn't it possible for anyone to be laughed out of this business?


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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2014 4:32 pm 
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Quote:
Jean-Pierre Melville (Les Enfants Terribles),

Really? Is that what he is most well known for? It's a perfectly fine movie and all, but I'd say it's far from his best and is the least emblematic of his work based on the 5 or so that I've seen.


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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2014 4:32 pm 
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I couldn't find A Woman Is A Woman on Amazon, but others are already available for pre-order at Amazon (if you want to leave nasty reviews - don't see other use for them).


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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2014 5:12 pm 
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Gregory wrote:
Clouzot was pretty much excoriated by the New Wave.

I'm pretty sure no on that with his reputation if anything being aided by them.


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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2014 5:18 pm 
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Clouzot was associated with the tradition of quality but was generally well-liked by Truffaut et al. Here's Cahiers' thumbnail of Clouzot from their State of French Cinema issue:

Quote:
Henri-Georges Clouzot

At the age of seven, he wrote a play whose protagonist rid himself of his wife by putting nails in her soup. The story of his life reveals him to be stubborn, clear-sighted, concerned to express the “hard face” of existence. This is a “film auteur”. “I do not believe,” he says, “in a director who is not his own writer.“ He loves his metier. “I am most of all physical, but my greatest pleasure in directing a film, is the shooting, the editing.” He depicts situation with no concern for the judgments of society, but he puts himself in danger of taking the bite from his films by targeting too great a number of spectators. “I work for the Gaumont-Palace,” he proclaims. But we know so well that his concerns, his obsessions -- perversion, true cruelty -- are not compatible with the wants of the great public. Thus, how Clouzot is careful of self-censorship. Furthermore, he knows where he is going and why, in his gallery of monsters, he puts great emphasis on the revolting, the sadistic, the subversive, the executioner. By subtraction, he little-by-little reveals, with the sharpness of a photographic negative, the dazzling image of pure innocence and of selfless friendship.

And from Jean Douchet, speaking about the Young Turks
Quote:
But the film that received the most attention was Le Corbeau by Henri-Georges Clouzot: the film had a profound effect on these adolescents and to them represented the summit of cinematic art."

(All translations by our own jdcopp)


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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2014 5:34 pm 
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Rivette said in Cahiers in May 1957 that Clouzot was "corrupted by money" and "afraid to take risks."
Jean-Louis Tallenay said of Les Diaboliques, also in Cahiers, that it was a shame to "waste so much talent on a puzzle."
Truffaut praised his documentary The Mystery of Picasso, with some reservations, and that film was generally well received partly due to its bold technique. But the Cahiers critics were generally critical of his thrillers—too caught up in older conventions, his style exemplified the cinéma du papa.
Clouzot's reputation and career took a hit due to criticisms like these, and it was only later that his work was was rehabilitated.
In any case, I hope we can at least all agree that it's absurd to refer to a 1947 Clouzot film as French New Wave.


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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2014 7:11 pm 
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That press release from Lionsgate is absurd on so many levels...


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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2014 12:01 pm 
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swo17 wrote:
I wonder if they sat on these titles for so long that their license might be up soon, and so it would no longer be worth it to put any effort whatsoever into these releases.

One can only hope. Just look at what someone else was able to do with the Republic library (Olive) once Paramount got it back from Lionsgate.


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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2014 2:27 pm 
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Quote:
That press release from Lionsgate is absurd on so many levels...


not least because it classifies two British films as part of the "Nouvelle Vague"

and puts Lino Ventura in a nonexistent 1928 version of Les Miserables, when he would have been nine years old. I assume he played Cosette.


Last edited by whaleallright on Wed Sep 10, 2014 3:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2014 2:41 pm 
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It doesn't even seem like they're offering Army of Shadows in HD at all, either at Amazon or through iTunes.


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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2014 5:15 pm 
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They probably assumed no one would want to see a bunch of soldiers standing around in the dark in HD


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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Fri Sep 12, 2014 3:51 pm 

Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2008 12:49 pm
Scum.


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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Sat Sep 13, 2014 1:08 am 
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swo17 wrote:
I wonder if they sat on these titles for so long that their license might be up soon, and so it would no longer be worth it to put any effort whatsoever into these releases.

Is anyone here familiar with the circumstances of Studio Canal's ownership of these titles? Have they licensed the films from another party, or do they own them in perpetuity?


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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Sat Sep 13, 2014 2:11 am 
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They own them permanently.


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 Post subject: Re: Lionsgate
PostPosted: Mon Sep 22, 2014 4:25 pm 
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Don't Be a Menace to South Central While Drinking Your Juice in the Hood (1996) - 11/25/14

Lionsgate with another bold catalog release from the Miramax library....


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