Krzysztof Kieślowski

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MichaelB
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#76 Post by MichaelB » Sun Jan 07, 2007 5:31 am

skuhn8 wrote:Now KK doing Goodfellas, that'd be interesting (if not incredibly ridiculous):
VO: "Ever since I was a kid"
rapid cut to milk bottle falling in slow motion, crashing, screen turns white.
Cut to: Deep CU of mothers eyes. Camera pulls back to view her trudging off dejectedly.
Cut to: Deep CU of Italian eyes, deepset, wrinkles around the edges. Camera pulls back...slowly...to reveal a golden Sicilian smile.
VO continues: "to be a wise guy".
Next five minutes includes 23 shots from ever whirling points of view W/O dialogue or narration.
KK is great, but he can't do Scor-cease and more than Marty can do Kiss-lovsky.
I wrote something similar in the early 1990s when I fantasised about Die Hard 2 being directed by the other famous Finnish director of the era, because of some bureaucratic Brazil-style mix-up causing Renny Harlin to be replaced by Aki Kaurismäki at the last minute.

If I remember rightly, most of the film would have consisted of assorted morose people sitting around in the airport bar not saying very much, and dismissing offscreen explosions and gunfire with a casual shrug, or possibly an aphorism along the lines of Drifting Cloud's "Life is short and miserable, be merry when you can" (it wouldn't have been that exact one, as that film hadn't been made yet, but it was something similar).

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HerrSchreck
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#77 Post by HerrSchreck » Sun Jan 07, 2007 6:43 am

skuhn8 wrote:An' quit prescribing medication for me! I've got a small army of trained specialists taking care of that.
Who's the Pentagon chief what dispenses the operational principle of this Small Army-- Don "Way Too Small To Ever Ever Ever Get The Job Done" Rumsfeld?

This explains the Bagdhadi type death squad of the One Side Of Your Mind which assaults the other side of your mind and ties it up and shanghais it into running on naked feet into the middle of the road to blow itself up... again and again and again.

Schreck, looking at watch, whistling: "One, two, three," (raises head, lifts eyebrows & smiles wide in faux delight at sound of wet naked feet whapping on Budapest cobblestones... mock delighted surprise at Skuhn reeling in dead drunk with a dynamite knapsack. Hunches over to get down to skuhn's level and slaps knees & talks baby talk:) "WHO'S gonna bwow demsewfs up? WHO gonna go bwow dey wittul sewfs all de way up??"

Skuhn (jumping & barking & wagging tail,) "Ruff ruff!" (jumps left, schreck jumps right, skuhn barks & scurries right, schreck jumps left)

Schreck (carefully counting wristwatch): "Who gonna go boom?" (Slapping thighs) "Who go boom?" (Presses button beneath left armpit which ejects springs from sneaker bottoms and jumps behind nearby brick wall as barking leaping shitting & pissing skuhn explodes in all directions...)

Schreck looks at watch, counting... it all begins again... "INVADERS FROM MARS Brecht-type drag goddammit, etc" somebody mutters...

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#78 Post by TedW » Sun Jan 07, 2007 10:54 pm

Sorry to butt in, but did I just overhear someone call Martin Scorsese the "Van Halen" of American cinema?

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colinr0380
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#79 Post by colinr0380 » Fri Jan 26, 2007 9:11 pm

Spoilers for the Three Colours trilogy.

This thread inspired me to rewatch the Three Colours trilogy again and I would agree with Felix's comments. I think it is very important to see their interrelation, not just see Red as simply the best film, even if the popular interpretation seems to have been boiled down to choosing the actress you like best! (For the record, I feel closer to, or identify more with, Juliette Binoche's character, but I wish I was Irène Jacob's character! And in reality I'm probably as humiliated, calculating, unintentionally comic and clumsy with objects as Zbigniew Zamachowski's character from White! :wink: )

I really liked Annette Insdorf's commentaries on the films (I actually haven't watched Double Life of Veronique yet - does Insdorf tell the story of being so impressed by the character Jacob played in Au Revoir, Les Enfants that he wanted her for Veronique that she talks about on Red's commentary, on that commentary track?), for the way she points out some of the interrelationships between the films (the seven puppies in Red linked to the seven survivors of the ferry; the pregnant dog in Red compared to the mice in Blue; Emmanuelle Riva in Blue contrasted with Jean-Louis Trintingant in Red) and the amazing cinematography and use of light and music in each to evoke quite different moods.

I think looked at individually, the films in the trilogy are great, but they really show their magnificence once they are all seen together. There are the obvious interrelations such as the ferry at the end of Red and the one scene that shows how we should see the film as less about the individual narrative of the specific films but about the emotions or subtext that the films are dealing with - the scene with the old person at the bottle bank and the various characters reactions (or non-reactions!) to them.

I think, beyond seeing and enjoying the individual narrative of each film, we should also take a more intellectual point of view of the lead actor and actress as sort of being the same couple: Julie and Olivier in Blue; Karol and Dominique in White; and the much more complicated final film with the relationship between Valentin, the unamed judge played by Trintingant and Auguste and the way the themes of liberty, equality and fraternity are used to show a sort of progression in relationships through how they relate to power and control.

Julie in Blue is trying to free herself from life, to live a selfish life, in response to death of her husband and child. Despite wanting to sell, destroy and leave everything behind she only manages to become further haunted by her dead loved ones. It is only through accepting their absence and mourning that she can actually restart her life, which she can finally do with Olivier. But she is still at the beginning of the journey - she has only just awakened to being with another person, and how the 'constraint' of a relationship could actually be the freedom she has been searching for. She is still trapped behind a barrier at the end, unable to relate to the other characters shown in the beautiful panning sequence at the end of the film (that scene seems to have influenced the final pan in Donnie Darko!), but I think she at least wants to do so, which is a progression from shutting herself off.

Then in White Karol is not wanting freedom (that might best describe Dominique at the start of the film, divorcing Karol and kicking him out of her shop!). He gets what many would consider freedom, financial success, and throws it all away (as well as destroying his identity by faking his death) in his attempt to get 'equal' with Dominique. The ending would seem to suggest that Dominique forgives him and the wrongs they have done to each other have been cancelled out. They are now equal but, with Dominique in jail, they might not exactly be fraternal towards each other! Their relationship may now be one of mutual need - her with a criminal record and he officially dead - rather than one of respect and 'love'?

I like the scene where Blue and White intersect in the courtroom, and have wondered why there was no connection like that in Red. Of course there is the final ferry sequence, but that is more in the sense of 'wrapping up' the whole trilogy. Then I felt that there were no shared sequences with Blue and White earlier in Red because Red is a much more complex film. Rather than just having Julie and Karol cross in the courtroom, Red sets up Valentin and Auguste continually crossing paths and not meeting and beyond that the, unrecognised by either, 'double life' of the old judge and Auguste.

Fraternity, or empathy, brings Valentin into contact with the judge. Her kindness, and the danger of it being destroyed by the problems she is having with her drug addicted brother and overbearing boyfriend in England, is the story of the final film. She is given a cautionary tale in the judge who let revenge get the better of him and who has become a voyeur, and then gets a metaphorical chance to save the judge through being able to start a relationship with the about-to-be-embittered-through-betrayal Auguste in the beautiful end to the trilogy. (This theme is also in Blue where Julie encounters a neighbour Lucide. Lucide on first meeting Julie mentions how she had a blue mobile as a child, making her a replacement for Julie's dead daughter. This connection might prompt Julie to go to Lucide when she calls for her help at the strip club. Just by going and supporting Lucide, Julie is given a second chance of coming to terms with her dead family and beginning anew with Olivier by seeing the television show)

Valentin when she begins the film seems naive and innocent - happy! As the film progresses though she is shown to not be happy because she has cut herself off from dark truths in the world (as Julie tried to), but more because she is secure in herself. She is able to go about in the world without much difficulty (compared to the constant failure and humiliation Karol faced in White), and so has the self confidence to reject the advances of a photographer, or to confront the judge, and to be hurt by her boyfriend when he reacts jealously to her not being by the telephone when he calls but not see it as her failure but as a problem he has about letting her have a life apart from him.

I think that brings up the idea of being able to like yourself and your actions, or the feeling that you have a place in the world. If you have that (and compared to Julie, Karol, the judge and Auguste, she has) you are then better able to look outside yourself and your problems and help others, as shown by the bottle bank scene.

It seems that all of Valentin's problems are in the background - either easy to deal with such as the photographer, or off screen such as the telephone conversations with her boyfriend and her brother. The major problems she faces - running over the dog and meeting the judge (leading to making a friend and getting a puppy!) and the ferry disaster (leading to love?) have personally positive results for her and she is rewarded for the empathy she shows in her reactions to people, whether family, co-workers, the judge, people she knows casually (such as the cafe owner) and complete strangers (such as the cleaner interrupting their conversation in the theatre after the fashion show). I really like the way in Blue that Julie gets a piece of good luck when just after missing Olivier's car leaving a car park he is stopped by a red ambluance and she can catch up with him again - an example of Valentin's 'red' good luck bleeding into the other films. Julie does also perform an unselfish act of helping her husband's mistress in Blue which could be seen as a foreshadowing of Valentin's unselfishness in Red, and perhaps makes up for her missing the old woman at the bottle bank! By the way, does anyone else think that the old people at the bottle bank are meant to represent the main characters when they are old (like in the judge's dream)? For example Julie's and Valentin's old people are women, and Karol's is a man. This may add weight to an argument that treating others badly (as Karol does), or being too self absorbed and not recognising someone needs help (as with Julie) in the end is just hurting yourself.

In a sense the seventh survivor from the ferry, named but not seen, could be a stand-in for the judge. It seems to me that the judge has the darker role that Julie and Karol had in the first two films, but instead of being trapped behind glass his encounter, and fraternity with, Valentin has purged him of his listening equipment and broken the barriers between him and the outside world. The metaphorical barrier might have been broken by a neighbour angrily chucking a brick through his window(!), but that just shows that the outside world can be cruel as well as kind but it is our attitudes toward it, helped and reinvigorated by our relationships with others (plus being helped by what Annette Insdorf characterises as 'guardian angels' who helpfully appear throughout the trilogy - and these are films that exist in a universe of fate where deus ex machina(tions) are commonplace), that can help us face our problems and even our tragedies.

Sorry if the above is a bit muddled and unreadable. I hope it is of some interest anyway!

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rohmerin
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#80 Post by rohmerin » Fri Jun 08, 2007 6:29 pm

This forum looks like the perfect place to try to find a mistery- You're experts on finding articles, etc, please, help me. Does anyone remember the CENSORSHIP on Kieslowski's WHITE?

Remember almost the end. I perfectly remember that when the film was released in Spain, there was an ORGASM sequence of a tunnel, and the camera follows the tunnel on high speed untill the white light.

Today, I've seen the Spanish DVD from licensed by MK2, they have got the same master, and there was not a tunnel. There was a fade to black, and then, a white screen with Julie Delpy's oh, oh, ah, oui. I remember having read an article about that change, but I don't know in which Spanish Cinema Magazine I did.

I've fought with google in English and Spanish, and it was a failure except that one famous Spanish film critic talks about the tunnel I saw , he saw, at Cinemas in Spain.

Any help ? In another dvdtalk borad (in Spanish) another user remember the tunnel, but neithetr IMDB or Wikipedia says nothing about "alternate versions", and I swear there're two version of WHITE: what I saw at the cinema, and what I saw today. May be it's about 20 seconds, but they are like night and day. WHY ?

gracias.

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dadaistnun
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#81 Post by dadaistnun » Wed Jun 13, 2007 1:09 pm

That's the first I've ever heard of this. I can only say that the U.S./Miramax theatrical, laserdisc, and dvd releases are all identical and all have the scene as the fade-to-white you describe.

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MichaelB
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#82 Post by MichaelB » Thu Jul 26, 2007 6:55 pm

I've just put together a first draft of a Kieslowski DVD filmography - additions and/or corrections gratefully received.

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dadaistnun
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#83 Post by dadaistnun » Fri Jul 27, 2007 8:40 am

I'm not sure how detailed you want to get, but it may be worth noting that the version of The Office on Miramax's White dvd isn't subtitled.

Nice work, though!

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MichaelB
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#84 Post by MichaelB » Fri Jul 27, 2007 8:44 am

dadaistnun wrote:I'm not sure how detailed you want to get, but it may be worth noting that the version of The Office on Miramax's White dvd isn't subtitled.
That is certainly worth noting, and I'll duly note it. I've also been adding links to reviews, but that's still ongoing.

(When I started, I thought it would be a much more straightforward job than it's turned out to be - but there's a truly staggering amount of Kieslowski available on DVD now. Most impressively, there's hardly any overlap between PWA's double-disc documentary anthology and the extras on the Artificial Eye/Kino/Criterion discs.)

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dadaistnun
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#85 Post by dadaistnun » Fri Jul 27, 2007 8:47 am

I imagine the PWA set sold very well, so I hope they are able to release a second set with the remaining films.

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MichaelB
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#86 Post by MichaelB » Fri Jul 27, 2007 6:38 pm

Has anyone reviewed it anywhere? I've just added links to reviews of pretty much every other DVD.

Just answered my own question - Doug Cummings discusses the set in detail on his blog (part 1/part 2).

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Gropius
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#87 Post by Gropius » Sat Jul 28, 2007 9:13 am

MichaelB wrote:Most impressively, there's hardly any overlap between PWA's double-disc documentary anthology and the extras on the Artificial Eye/Kino/Criterion discs.)
I was rather disappointed that the PWA set didn't include Factory, possibly my favourite Kieslowski doc, because I don't want to have to buy The Double Life of Veronique in order to watch it again.

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kieslowski_67
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#88 Post by kieslowski_67 » Sun Aug 05, 2007 11:16 am

[quote="Dylan"]I personally had no idea people were so split on Kieslowski, particularly since "Red" placed #5 on the Lists Project...but maybe I should've expected the backlash, as every other thread about Kieslowski on these boards has a few naysayers, and one thread (“Kieslowski Retrospectiveâ€

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moviscop
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Trois Couleurs: Bleu (Kieslowski, 1993)

#89 Post by moviscop » Tue Jul 08, 2008 10:07 pm

I really want to have a discussion on Blue. I feel like the majority of the film lies beneath the surface and want to be enlightened as to it's contents. I believe this film is a masterpiece, however, it seems like an incomplete work. Although it is a separate story (as is each element of the trilogy) I find it missing pieces that could lie in the other films (which I haven't seen yet). This film is one of the most beautiful I have seen for its combination of music and drama.

What are your thoughts on this film,
SpoilerShow
especially the montage at the end

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domino harvey
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Re: Krzysztof Kieslowski

#90 Post by domino harvey » Fri May 21, 2010 10:51 pm

So... the three colors trilogy is OOP, as is the single release for White. What in the world?

claude
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Re: Krzysztof Kieslowski

#91 Post by claude » Sat May 22, 2010 4:56 am

domino harvey wrote:What in the world?
What in the World is a song by David Bowie released on his 1977 album Low.

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zedz
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Re: Krzysztof Kieslowski

#92 Post by zedz » Sun May 23, 2010 6:33 pm

domino harvey wrote:So... the three colors trilogy is OOP, as is the single release for White. What in the world?
I assume these films are right at the top of Criterion's want list, so if they're up for grabs that's where I'd be looking.

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fdm
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Re: Krzysztof Kieslowski

#93 Post by fdm » Fri Jun 11, 2010 3:08 am

Lost track of the goings on with Miramax, but the trilogy was their doing in the U.S.

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MichaelB
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Re: Krzysztof Kieslowski

#94 Post by MichaelB » Wed Nov 10, 2010 9:59 am

The good news: two rare early Kieślowski features, Personnel (Personel, 1975) and The Calm (Spokój, 1976) are making their DVD debuts later this month.

The bad news: I've yet to turn up any evidence that they have English subtitles, and I've examined some of the other DVDs in that series in branches of Empik and found no indication of English subtitles on the packaging.

But I thought it was worth flagging them up anyway - and of course I'd dearly love to be proved wrong!

UPDATE: I've found sets of subtitles for each via allsubs.org - so I think I'll take the plunge. Especially as the price is ludicrously low - at the current exchange rate it's £7.71/€8.99/US$12.39 per disc.

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dadaistnun
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Re: Krzysztof Kieslowski

#95 Post by dadaistnun » Wed Nov 10, 2010 11:04 am

Please let us know if they do end up having English subs. I'm always eager to see more early Kieslowski.

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MichaelB
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Re: Krzysztof Kieslowski

#96 Post by MichaelB » Wed Nov 10, 2010 2:47 pm

I'm all but certain that they don't have English subs - but this may not be a problem, as the files on allsubs.com appear to be the real deal.

Adam
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Re: Krzysztof Kieslowski

#97 Post by Adam » Mon Jan 03, 2011 3:12 am

When you can, please add his documentaries...

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James Mills
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Re: Krzysztof Kieslowski

#98 Post by James Mills » Mon Jan 03, 2011 4:29 am

Adam wrote:When you can, please add his documentaries...
Done, thanks.

I haven't seen any of his documentaries unfortunately. Have you had the pleasure of seeing some? If so, which do you recommend, and how can I find it?

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MichaelB
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Re: Krzysztof Kieslowski

#99 Post by MichaelB » Mon Jan 03, 2011 10:21 am

My latest list of what's available on DVD in English-friendly copies, based on the filmography appended to Culture.pl's admirably thorough overview of his work:

1966 - The Tram (Tramwaj, 5 mins, IMDB)
  • • Included in Artificial Eye's A Short Film About Love, Region 2 PAL (review: The Digital Fix)
    • Included in Miramax's White, Region 1 NTSC (review: DVD Talk)
    • Included in Kino's A Short Film About Love, Region 0 NTSC (review: DVD Talk)
    • Included in Kino's The Krzysztof Kieslowski Collection, Region 0 NTSC (review: DVDBeaver)
    • Included in Umbrella Entertainment's A Short Film About Love, Region 4 PAL (review: Michael D's)
1966 - The Office (Urząd, 6 mins, IMDB) 1967 - Concert of Requests (Koncert Życzeń, 17 mins, IMDB) 1969 - From the City of Łódź (Z miasta Łodzi, 18 mins, IMDB) 1970 - I Was A Soldier (Byłem żołnierzem, 16 mins, IMDB) 1970 - Factory (Fabryka, 17 mins, IMDB) 1971 - Before the Rally (Przed rajdem, 14 mins, IMDB) 1972 - Workers 1971: Nothing About Us Without Us (Robotnicy '71: Nic o nas bez nas, 47 mins, IMDB) 1972 - Refrain (Refren, 10 mins, IMDB) 1973 - Pedestrian Subway (Przejście podziemne, 28 mins, IMDB) 1973 - Bricklayer (Murarz, 18 mins, IMDB) 1974 - X-Ray (Prześwietlenie, 13 mins, IMDB) 1974 - First Love (Pierwsza miłość, 52 mins, IMDB) 1975 - Personnel (Personel, 72 mins, IMDB) 1975 - Curriculum Vitae (Życiorys, 46 mins, IMDB) 1976 - The Calm (Spokój, 70 mins, IMDB) 1976 - Slate (Klaps, 5 mins, IMDB) 1976 - The Scar (Blizna, 112 mins, IMDB) 1976 - Hospital (Szpital, 22 mins, IMDB) 1977 - I Don't Know (Nie wiem, 43 mins, IMDB) 1977 - A Night Porter's Point of View (Z punktu widzenia nocnego portiera, 17 mins, IMDB)
  • • Included in Artificial Eye's A Short Film About Killing, Region 2 PAL
    • Included in PWA's Polish School of the Documentary: Krzysztof Kieślowski, Region 0 PAL (review: Filmjourney.org)
    • Included in Kino's A Short Film About Killing (review: DVD Talk)
    • Included in Kino's The Krzysztof Kieslowski Collection, Region 0 NTSC (review: DVDBeaver)
    • Included in Umbrella Entertainment's A Short Film About Killing, Region 4 PAL (review: Michael D's)
    • Included in WFDiF's Kieślowski: Documentarist, Region 0 PAL (NB: New restoration)
1978 - Seven Women of Different Ages (Siedem kobiet w różnym wieku, 16 mins, IMDB)
  • • Included in PWA's Polish School of the Documentary: Krzysztof Kieślowski, Region 0 PAL (review: Filmjourney.org)
1979 - Camera Buff (Amator, 112 mins, IMDB) 1980 - Railway Station (Dworzec, 17 mins, IMDB) 1980 - Talking Heads (Gadające głowy, 16 mins, IMDB) 1981 - Blind Chance (Przypadek, 122 mins, IMDB) 1981 - Short Working Day (Bez końca, 73 mins, IMDB) 1984 - No End (Bez końca, 109 mins, IMDB) 1987 - A Short Film About Killing (Krótki film o zabijaniu, 84 mins, IMDB) 1988 - A Short Film About Love (Krótki film o miłości, 87 mins, IMDB) 1988 - Decalogue 1: Thou Shalt Have No Other Gods But Me (Dekalog, jeden, 53 mins, IMDB) 1988 - Decalogue 2: Thou Shalt Not Take the Name of the Lord Thy God in Vain (Dekalog, dwa, 57 mins, IMDB) 1988 - Decalogue 3: Honour The Sabbath Day (Dekalog, trzy, 56 mins, IMDB) 1988 - Decalogue 4: Honour Thy Father and Thy Mother (Dekalog, cztery, 55 mins, IMDB) 1988 - Decalogue 5: Thou Shalt Not Kill (Dekalog, pięć, 57 mins, IMDB) 1988 - Decalogue 6: Thou Shalt Not Commit Adultery (Dekalog, sześć, 58 mins, IMDB) 1988 - Decalogue 7: Thou Shalt Not Steal (Dekalog, siedem, 55 mins, IMDB) 1988 - Decalogue 8: Thou Shalt Not Bear False Witness (Dekalog, osiem, 55 mins, IMDB) 1988 - Decalogue 9: Thou Shalt Not Covet Thy Neighbour's Wife (Dekalog, dziewięć, 58 mins, IMDB) 1988 - Decalogue 10: Thou Shalt Not Covet Thy Neighbour's Goods (Dekalog, dziesięć, 57 mins, IMDB) 1991 - The Double Life of Véronique (La double vie de Véronique, 98 mins, IMDB) 1993 - Three Colours: Blue (Trois couleurs: Bleu, 100 mins, IMDB) 1994 - Three Colours: White (Trois couleurs: Blanc, 91 mins, IMDB) 1994 - Three Colours: Red (Trois couleurs: Red, 99 mins, IMDB) Not (yet?) available on DVD

1968 - The Photograph (Zdjęcie, 32 mins, IMDB)
1972 - Between Wroclaw and Zielona Gora (Między Wrocławiem a Zieloną Górą, 10 mins, IMDB)
1972 - Principles of Safety and Hygiene in a Copper Mine (Podstawy BHP w kopalni miedzi, 21 mins, IMDB)
1988 - Seven Days a Week: Warsaw (Siedem dni w tygodniu, 18 mins, IMDB)
Last edited by MichaelB on Sun Aug 06, 2017 4:41 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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antnield
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Re: Krzysztof Kieslowski

#100 Post by antnield » Mon Jan 03, 2011 10:38 am

To the publications you can add Geoff Andrew's The 'Three Colours' Trilogy.

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