Federico Fellini

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jorencain
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Federico Fellini

#1 Post by jorencain » Tue Jun 07, 2005 10:27 pm

Federico Fellini 1920 - 1993

Image


FILMOGRAPHY

Luci del varieta / Variety Lights (1950) - Criterion

Lo sceicco bianco / The White Sheik (1952) - Criterion

I vitelloni (1953) - Criterion / Image

L' amore in citta / Love in the City ("Un agenzia matrimoniale" segment, 1953) - Minerva (region 2)

La strada (1954) - Criterion

Il bidone (1955) - Image / BFI (region 2)

Le notti di Cabiria / Nights of Cabiria (1957) - Criterion

La dolce vita (1960) - Koch Lorber / Medusa (region 2)

Boccaccio '70 ("Le tentazioni del dottor Antonio" segment, 1962) - NoShame

8 1/2 (1963) - Criterion

Giulietta degli spiriti / Juliet of the Spirits (1965) - Criterion

Histoires extraordinaires / Spirits of the Dead ("Toby Dammit" segment, 1968) - HVE

Fellini Satyricon (1969) - MGM

I clowns (1971)

Roma (1972) - MGM

Amarcord (1973) - Criterion

Il Casanova di Federico Fellini / Fellini's Casanova (1976) - Carlotta / Freemantle (region 0)

Prova d'orchestra / Orchestra Rehearsal (1978) - Fox Lorber / Infinity (region 2)

La citta delle donne / City of Women (1980) - New Yorker

E la nave va / And The Ship Sails On (1983) - Criterion / Infinity (region 2)

Ginger e Fred / Ginger and Fred (1986) - Warner / Infinity (region 2)

Intervista (1987) - Koch Lorber

La voce della luna / The Voice of the Moon (1990)


FORUM DISCUSSION

Federico Fellini

Il Bidone


WEB RESOURCES

Wikipedia

Fellini Foundation - in Italian

Turner Classic Movies

Senses of Cinema

Senses of Cinema / Roma

Strictly Film School

Fellini's artworks/drawings

Images and Archetypes

Excerpt from Fellini: A Life

Bright Lights Film Journal - Interview

Bright Lights Film Journal / Orchestra Rehearsal

Vassar Kids Do Fellini

Felliniana

Fellini's Grave

Fellini Ungrateful Celebration - Commemorates the 10th Anniversary of Fellini's Death


BOOKS

Federico Fellini: Interviews - edited by Bert Cardullo

Fellini as Auteur - by John C. Stubbs

Fellini on Fellini - by Federico Fellini and Isabel Quigley

Federico Fellini - by Christopher Wiegand

The Cinema of Federico Fellini - by Peter Bondanella

The Cinema of Federico Fellini - by Peter Bondanella

Fellini! - by Vincenzo Mollica

Fellini 8 1/2 by Tazio Secchiaroli (Te Neues Publishing Company)

I, Fellini by Charlotte Chandler (Cooper Square Press)

I'm a Born Liar: A Fellini Lexicon by Damian Pettigrew

Federico Fellini: Contemporary Perspectives (Toronto Italian Studies) by Frank Burke and Marguerite R. Waller (University of Toronto Press)

Fellini: Costumes and Fashion by Ida Panicelli, Giulia Mafai, Laura Delli Colli, Samuele Mazza (Charta)

8 1/2 edited by Charles Affron (Rutgers University Press)

La Strada edited by Peter Bondanella and Manuela Gieri (Rutgers University Press)


DVD

Ciao, Federico! - documentary about the filming of Saytricon directed by Gideon Bachman / Tristar Columbia/Gaumont

L'ultima sequenza - documentary about 8 1/2's lost ending / Instituto Luce (region 2)

The Magic of Fellini - directed by Carmen Piccini / Image

I'm a Born Liar - directed by Damian Pettigrew / First Look

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Dylan
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#2 Post by Dylan » Wed Jun 08, 2005 6:11 am

jorencain wrote:So, I just watched "Satyricon" again, and I'm sort of on the fence with this one. There is so much of Fellini that I love, both early ("Nights of Cabiria") and late ("And The Ship Sails On"), but "Satyricon", as well as "Juliet Of The Spirits", is really a mixed bag. I haven't seen "City Of Women", "Ginger and Fred," or "Casanova", but I'm under the impression that these are somewhere in the same ballpark as the other two.

In "Satyricon" particularly, all of the sets and locations are beautiful, and almost every frame of the film would be perfect hanging in a museum. I also love the crazy-ass soundtrack, and the quieter scenes; for instance, when the couple frees their slaves and commit suicide. I can't get into any scenes where it's over-the-top carnivalesque and noisy (in this, or in any other Fellini), and I think that there are just too many of those types of scenes in this film. I can handle small doses of large groups of people acting weird, but it really takes me out of the film and is overly distracting.

Anyway, I don't have much else to say, but since there isn't any other thread (that I found, anyway) devoted to Fellini, I thought I'd throw it out there.
Federico Fellini is my favorite director, and (among many thousands of things) his consistency was awesome. Between 1951 with "Variety Lights" to 1978 with "Orchestra Rehearsal," just about everything was unbelievably remarkable (including "Juliet of the Spirits" and "Casanova"). I could write and talk for days about Fellini, his filmmaking is simply gorgeous, and an enormous inspiration on my life and aspirations.

For me, the only two films during his high point (1951-78) that aren't great are "Roma" and "Dr. Antonio," which I still think is are good movies, and Fellini's impeccable signature is undoubtedly on both. There are many memorable scenes in "Roma," such as the religious run-way show, the entire sequence with Fellini and crew, the underground paintings fading, the whore house...I didn't feel that it was as successful as adding up to a coheisive whole as most of his other films, but I like it. "Dr. Antonio" struck me as minor but very fun (particularly the construction of Ekberg's advertisement). It does feel a little choppy to me (probably due to the fact that the first edit of this film was 90 minutes in Fellini's hope that the producers would allow him to release it separately from "Boccaccio '70," but they figured that dropping his name would lose too much publicity, so they had Fellini cut it to the proposed 50 minutes, which may explain the film's odd continuity). And everything else in between those years is my favorite body of work from any filmmaker.

I admired, but didn't care for, "Satyricon" when I first saw it, but I saw it again over the summer and it blew me away. Now I think it's one of Fellini's greatest films. Giuseppe Rotunno's photography (the only 2.35:1 film he shot for Fellini) is gorgeously painterly. Nino Rota's score is strange and ingenius. And above all, Fellini's presentation of the material is absolutely fascinating. I could watch it several times and never tire of it, in fact (like most of his films) it can only get better. It's strangely beautiful.

However, after "Orchestra Rehearsal," (which is, coincidently, when Fellini's composer Nino Rota died) everything I've seen (which is everything but "Voice of the Moon") is a mixed bag, or worse. The considerably flawed "City of Women" was his next movie, and it's filled to the brim with good ideas and a fun older Mastroianni, but it's easily 40 minutes too long. It seems to be a 90 or 100 minute film stretched to 140 minutes. Everytime I view it, I feel as if I'm watching a rough cut...something about it doesn't feel 'finished', and many scenes don't have music when they feel they should...but it's still worth a look for Fellini fans, this is his final film (and again, I say this without having seen "Moon") to feature some vintage Felliniesque elements.

"And the Ship Sails On" is more consistent than "City," and it looks nice, but it drags. Like "City of Women," some editing and perhaps a more focued narrative would make it much better. But even as lesser Fellini's, they're still interesting movies.

But now we enter the mediocre, as "Ginger and Fred" and "Intervista" are absolutely his only mediocre films. "Ginger and Fred" feels way too long. But in this case we have a 30 minute story stretched out to 125 minutes. He seems to have nothing interesting to say or show here (save for the final dance scene with Masina and Mastroianni, which is fun, but it comes at least an hour too late...the hour preceding, entirely comprised with Masina and Mastroianni wandering about the studio, is really boring). And unlike every single Fellini film that preceded this, the cinematography is so normal, like something anybody could've shot. Above all, the snail's pacing of Masina and Mastroianni's reunion in the beginning is dull, and I found the endless television satire progressively unfunny. Only Nicola Piovani's great Rota-like soundtrack is telling us we're in a Fellini film, very little else is. I read somewhere that this was originally written as an episode for a TV show, and it's a shame that it wasn't, as I do think this would make a very nice short film, just nothing longer than an hour.

"Intervista" also seems to go on forever. The reunion between Marcello Mastroianni and Anita Ekberg is good, and once again, Nicola Piovani knows how a Fellini movie is scored, but everything else is dull, and rather un-Fellini like to me (particularly in presentation).

"Voice of the Moon," from what I've read, seems to be his return to form, and I intend to see it whenever a subtitled DVD is available.
Last edited by Dylan on Mon Dec 11, 2006 3:09 am, edited 8 times in total.

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Lino
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#3 Post by Lino » Wed Jun 08, 2005 11:02 am

Great post, Dylan. Your posts seem to get better and better.

Through the years, I have found that the Fellinis that I like the most are often the ones people dislike the most - maybe because I see them through a different perspective, I guess.

So, if I had to name a trio of his films that I directly identify with they would have to be Juliet of the Spirits, Satyricon and Casanova. Maybe it's because these three go as far away from reality as he ever went, maybe it's because of the themes he explores in them, maybe it's the way he tells the story visually, or even maybe it's because I firmly believe that with these three he was able to conceive them as "total works" in that they do not feel somewhat transitional films as some do - they feel and look "complete" and "whole".

If you look at his work as a whole (sorry for the redundance), it's clear to see that he gradually went further and further away from reality - or neo-realism - almost as if his life depended on that very thing. And to me, he achieved that personal goal with what is arguably his most artificial or unreal film ever: Casanova.

So I guess if you want to talk about "Late Fellini", you've got to have all this in mind and I think it's wrong to dismiss some of his later films as derivative or unfocused - he was just on another wavelength from us viewers. It's ouir job to play catch-up with him. The results may turn out to be a pleasant surprise.

Oh, and Dylan: you definitely meed to watch Satyricon more times! It's an acquired taste that once you get the gist of it, you'll feel rewarded.

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Michael
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#4 Post by Michael » Wed Jun 08, 2005 11:22 am

Oh, and Dylan: you definitely meed to watch Satyricon more times! It's an acquired taste that once you get the gist of it, you'll feel rewarded.
Yes, I entirely agree with that suggestion. At first I didn't like Satyricon but it grew on me over the years so I went back to watching it and ended up loving it. I believe that Fellini described this film as a "sci fi film" or something like that. And also he used some set pieces from the old Star Trek series if I'm not mistaken. I can't remember exactly.

Amarcord, anyone? This is definitely my favorite post-8 1/2 Fellini film. His most feel-good, charming, hilarious masterpiece. His third best film.

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#5 Post by tartarlamb » Wed Jun 08, 2005 1:00 pm

It may just be because I'm a Classics student, but Satyricon is one of my favorite Fellini films, and I've never really understood the ambivalence that people have toward it. To me, its a brilliantly surreal pageant of first century Rome -- the grotesque mimes at the theatre, the brothels and banquets, and mystery cults, down to its artistic and sexual sensibilities and social hierarchy. It loses a bit of its historical meat as it moves outward and eastward toward the provinces (and as it departs more and more from Petronius's text), but that's because it isn't a tired historical drama -- its a dream of Rome that gradually dissolves from the allure of sensual pleasures as they are known, into the mystery and terror of these pleasures as they exist in Encolpio's mind. The minotaur scene and the sexual hero quest, both departures from Petronius, are two of the greatest cinematic depictions of psycho-sexual terror on film, IMO.

I've always thought the fragmented and difficult text of Petronius was an odd choice for an adaptation, but its uniquely suited for Fellini's episodic style, and it grants him a lot of freedom (which he takes full advantage of). I would kill for a good commentary track on this film.

Besides, its just a beautiful film to look at, if nothing else.

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#6 Post by Elephant » Wed Jun 08, 2005 1:14 pm

tartarlamb wrote:Besides, its just a beautiful film to look at, if nothing else.
Which may be why--though I love his earlier stuff--I really love Satyricon, Roma, and Juliet of the Spirits. Amarcord is my absolute favorite; his use of gaudy, brilliant colors coupled with the stunning set pieces--any of which would make a wonderful short film--is plenty of reason for me to return to these again and again. This period of his work is almost an assault of weirdness--but to his credit it never seems like weirdness for the sake of being weird, just a brave filmmaker pushing his medium to see how far he can go.

I haven't seen Casanova, but I've seen it on DVD-R in a few places around town so now I'm convinced I have to see it right away.

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#7 Post by cafeman » Wed Jun 08, 2005 5:45 pm

Dylan, I have to completely disagree with your opinion on Ginger and Fred, as it is easily my favorite Fellini film. Certainly 8 1/2 is more majestic and virtuoso, but Ginger and Fred is the movie that I just fell in love with like few other.

I am generally mixed on Fellini, loving the aforementioned films and Juliet of the Spirits, mildly disliking Clowns, Amarcord and flat-out hating Casanova and his "Director`s Journal." I don`t even know what to think of Toby Dammit.[/b]

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Dylan
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#8 Post by Dylan » Thu Jun 09, 2005 12:28 am

Amarcord, anyone? This is definitely my favorite post-8 1/2 Fellini film. His most feel-good, charming, hilarious masterpiece. His third best film.
I love Amarcord. In its every last word, I actually believe that Roger Ebert's Great Movies entry on his website articulates my feelings on it as well. Lovely stories floating about, the casting is as impeccable as Felliniesque can get, and it looks gorgeous. My favorite moment is undoubtedly when the boys dance in the fog.

Cafeman, that's interesting that "Ginger and Fred" is your favorite. I think a lot of people like it, but even though Fellini is my favorite director, I found nothing to like (except for the dance scene, which, as I said, I believe comes far too late), and it seemed mundane and sluggish.

I loved "Casanova," adored "Toby Dammit" (which I think is one of his finest works), and enjoyed the "Director's Notebook," particularly for what it was (a small docu on Fellini's failed attempt to make "Mastorna"...it gets a little silly, but the scenes with Mastroianni are great). I thought "The Clowns" was wonderful, but the video quality on the Hens Tooth is completely awful, and I've never been able to sit through it again (waiting patiently for a DVD with Eng. subs). Of course, all of these aforementioned were part of his miraculous 1951-78 output, most of which I personally consider masterpieces.

I've seen everything by Fellini except for his 20-minute "Love in the City" segment and "Voice of the Moon" (and there are also various films he co-wrote that I'm quite interested in seeing as well).

Dylan
Last edited by Dylan on Tue Oct 24, 2006 6:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#9 Post by cafeman » Thu Jun 09, 2005 6:48 am

Yeah, Clowns is...exactly what it is. It`s decent. I felt it could`ve been more, and Fellini himself admitted in his book that he had no idea what he wanted of that movie, that he just went around filming intereviews and circus performances, and then only later found a form for it, and it shows. It is a nice homage to a lost art, almost like he presented a culture of a dying nation about to go extinct, but as a film it really is nothing special. I vastly prefer it to the Director`s Journal, his other TV excursion.

Yeah, Toby Dammit wasn`t bad, though it`s due for a rewatch on my part.

As for G&F, it`s, for me, the film where he manages to exude the most charm. It really feels like his testament film, and I`m betting that it`s actually his most autobigraphic film of all. It`s just a nice, quiet story about two ordinary people who think they get a second chance, but really it is too late. And yet, it`s not presented as too regretful.

I don`t think I`m making myself too clear. Either way, it`s a movie that, if you don`t connect with it on an emotional level (as I did, big time), it`s lost on you.

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Michael
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Fellini: The Short Films

#10 Post by Michael » Fri Jun 10, 2005 10:04 am

Fellini: The Short Films

I'm considering about purchasing Spirits of the Dead and Boccaccio '70s - both containing Fellini's shorts. With 8 1/2 being my favorite film of all time (something that I keep stressing on far too many times here on this forum), it's surprising that I've not checked out The Temptation of Dr. Antonio and Toby Dammitt yet. How are they? Worth getting the DVDs just for those films? Do they hold up to repeated viewings? How do they compare to Fellini's other works? I have no interest in seeing the other films on those DVDs.

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#11 Post by Napier » Fri Jun 10, 2005 12:02 pm

Michael wrote:I'm considering about purchasing Spirits of the Dead and Boccaccio '70s - both containing Fellini's shorts. With 8 1/2 being my favorite film of all time (something that I keep stressing on far too many times here on this forum), it's surprising that I've not checked out The Temptation of Dr. Antonio and Toby Dammitt yet. How are they?
Michael, I bought the Spirits of the Dead DVD blindly! And thoroughly enjoyed on repeat viewings. Come on, Poe,Fellini,Malle,Vadim.They are all good shorts,but the Fellini one is the best! Bocaccio 70 also a great film/DVD!No Shame studio's transfers are great.Another great one is Yesterday,Today,and Tomorrow.Marcello and Sophia are great! Hope this helps. Best MN

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Michael
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#12 Post by Michael » Fri Jun 10, 2005 12:12 pm

Grazie, Napier! The thing is that I've never been a fan of De Sica even though my respect for Ladri di biciclette and Umberto D is enormous. Same thing with Rossellini. In my opinion, Fellini and Visconti are the best when it comes to the Italian cinema.

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jorencain
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#13 Post by jorencain » Fri Jun 10, 2005 2:09 pm

I think Boccaccio '70 was well worth it. I went into mainly for the Fellini (which I really enjoyed; it's his funniest work, I think), but I enjoyed each of the other 3 films as well, at least to some degree. I will also reiterate that the transfer is very good, and I wouldn't hesitate checking it out.

I've been wondering the same things about "Spirits of the Dead" myself, so I guess I'll need to check that out as well.

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#14 Post by J M Powell » Fri Jun 10, 2005 3:12 pm

If I were you I would definitely try to see Spirits of the Dead but I wouldn't buy it. The Home Vision edition contains an inferior dub of precisely the short you're interested in (and the best short on the disc, and one of Fellini's best films of any length), Toby Dammit. The disc sports only the French dub, which is awful compared to the English dub. On the other hand, so far as I know, the English dub is completely unavailable on DVD anywhere, and you do get the other two (French) shorts in their original language this way. Still, many of us are crossing our fingers. Just so you know.

Boccacio '70, no opinion.

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Dylan
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#15 Post by Dylan » Fri Jun 10, 2005 3:34 pm

"Toby Dammit" is by far one of Fellini's finest pieces. The downside is that it still isn't available in it's proper version (though I'm unsure if another region's DVD has corrected this, anybody who knows please post!). The Home Vision Video version distractingly dubs the entire film into French (except the Malle, which was filmed in French). While it doesn't hurt the first two segments (which I don't like, by the way), it really tortures Fellini's.

Terrance Stamp gives what may be his finest performance on film, but his fine English accent is dubbed into French. The point of the story is that he is an English actor in Italy, but the Italians are also dubbed into French. The dubbing really makes no sense. The segment is so wonderful that it's still worth seeing the DVD, and any Fellini fan should be able to overcome this just to enjoy one of his finest pieces. I sincerely hope that a proper English/Italian version arises sometime in the future, as I still haven't seen this wonderful short properly.

The "Boccaccio '70" segment by Fellini (the best segment in the film) is what I call a Felliniesque absurdist comedy, and on those terms it's quite good. The hilarious scene with the workers putting up the billboard is among the funniest moments of Fellini's career. Overall, Fellini fans should definitely seek it out, but I wouldn't say it's one of his best works, not even close, but it's quite good and funny. As for the other segments, Visconti's is good, De Sica's and Monticelli's are pretty good.

Anybody have any opinions on his "Love in the City" segment, which is still unavailable?

Dylan
Last edited by Dylan on Fri Dec 01, 2006 8:13 am, edited 4 times in total.

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#16 Post by kieslowski_67 » Sun Jun 19, 2005 8:42 pm

MK2 released 'clowns' last year.

Italy released a Fellini box set that features 'satyricon', 'city of women', 'casanova', 'Ginger and Fred' last year. Awesome transfer enhanced for WS TV. You can get it for 55 Euros now from dvd.it (45%) discount.

Have to say that this batch of Fellinis is not among my favorites. Although still very good movies, Fellini really only made one true masterpiece (amarcord) after '8 1/2'.

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Michael
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#17 Post by Michael » Sun Jul 24, 2005 11:27 am

The "Boccaccio '70" segment by Fellini (the best segment in the film) is what I call a Felliniesque absurdist comedy, and on those terms it's quite good.
About Boccaccio '70:

Shut down your computer and head to your nearest Borders and pick up the dvd! I believe that Borders is giving out a 30% discount coupon if you sign up for it online. Anyway, pick up this dvd even if it's only for one piece - The Temptations of Dr. Antonio. Worth every cent of 20 bucks or even more.

I made a big mistake watching the Fellini piece first so make sure to watch it last. The striking images and music from Dr. Antonio will continue to consume your mind long after watching it. Getting through the next piece (the Visconti one) trying to shake the Antonio music out of my head was impossible! Fellini's use of images is powerful and so gorgeous as always. Dr. Antonio is unquestionably Fellini's most funniest film. The last shot will leave you grinning from ear to ear. A mini masterpiece.

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#18 Post by Fellini-Hexed » Fri Jan 20, 2006 1:05 am

Dr. Antonio is unquestionably Fellini's most funniest film. The last shot will leave you grinning from ear to ear. A mini masterpiece.
I wanted to know exactly the same thing, Dylan: has anyone seen A Matrimonial Agency? It's only that and Il Bidone I haven't seen yet, except for the tv commercials (which, believe it or not, come to exactly 8 1/2 minutes in total). And that Boccaccio 70 is the best omnibus film around, well I haven't seen enough of them to say, but I've never seen another one as consistently good as this one. One of my favourite DVDs.

Couldn't agree more, Michael, about Dr. Antonio. What I love about it is that it is so consistently delightful; it's told at top speed, but not so quickly that one feels that anything important to the tale is neglected. And it's so bloody satisfying to see Antonio flailing madly on the giant milk sign, madly in love with Anita Ekberg, humiliated, getting what wuz coming to him! Ahhh.

However, I'm not quite convinced that Dr.Antonio is Fellini's best, or 2nd best, SncDthMnky, not that I'd argue too heartily about it: I can think of at least 5 or 6 of his films which I often think of as his 'best'. Including...

Toby Dammit: now thatis one of his finest films, without a doubt. I would definitely buy Spirits of the Dead for that film alone, except for the dubbing issues Dylan points out. I think the dream logic of this film is the most truly realized of any film he made, the dream sequences of 8 1/2 included. The extended scene where Stamp drives through the streets of Rome with only his headlights illuminating things is so risky and true to dreams and dreaming; the numerous dead ends, the voices in the darkness, and the collapsed bridge all have the haze of dreaming about them. And the devil disguised as a young girl who trades in her bouncing ball for Dammit's head is the eeriest scene in all of Fellini's films that I can think of. She looks uncannily like the girl in The Ring, yes?

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#19 Post by jorencain » Sat Feb 11, 2006 5:29 pm

I just had the opportunity to see "Ginger and Fred", and I also have to disagree with you on this one, Dylan. It's such a sweet movie, and I didn't feel like it was too long at all. I agree that the cinematography is pretty bland in this one, but I was wrapped up in everything else so much that I didn't mind. While I love Fellini, the "carnivalesque" elements of his films are sometimes too much for me. I patiently wait through those moments in "Roma", "Amarcord", "And The Ship Sails On", "Satyricon" etc. that occasionally step over the line of good taste, but I find so many other things to enjoy. In "Ginger and Fred", we see the only time that Fellini uses these grotesque caricatures to make a statement about society and the culture that Masina and Mastroianni feel like phantoms in. In the other films, these types of characters just seem like weirdos, while here they have a function.

I realized another thing that makes these carnivalesque moments work; they give the quieter, more lyrical scenes much more impact. After the transvestite and friends go across the street to the bar, Ginger bumps into a homeless man asking for money, and the quietness of the scene is somehow very strong. The scene is about 30 seconds long, and completely inconsequential, yet it's still a powerful moment. Likewise, I was really moved when their friend Toto found them a rehearsal space. After the mayhem of the cafeteria, make-up room, and backstage, this quiet oasis was a place where they could actually talk to each other about their lives and their feelings for each other.

Anyway, I really enjoyed it, and thought it was a very sweet film about aging, nostalgia, and finding your place in a changing society. I also loved the ridiculous billboards throughout the film.
Last edited by jorencain on Sun Feb 12, 2006 9:42 am, edited 1 time in total.

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cafeman
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#20 Post by cafeman » Sat Feb 11, 2006 11:16 pm

Hurrah! Another Ginger and Fred admirer. Too bad it`s not out on DVD yet.

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#21 Post by davida2 » Sun Feb 12, 2006 7:25 am

kieslowski_67 wrote:Have to say that this batch of Fellinis is not among my favorites. Although still very good movies, Fellini really only made one true masterpiece (amarcord) after '8 1/2'.
As much as I love La Dolce Vita and 8 1/2, I'd rank Juliet and Amarcord equally - they were my first Fellini films, and - perhaps due to what I'd view them as overlooked, or unfairly derided - I tend to defend them a bit more strongly. Amarcord has a few of my absolute favorite scenes from any Fellini film, and I love the world that Fellini creates in Juliet- they both move very unconventionally, while remaining quite moving as stories.

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#22 Post by atcolomb » Mon Feb 13, 2006 1:49 pm

I should mention "And The Ship Sails On" (1984) whch is on dvd from Criterion. I think it's a great film and fans of Fellini should check it out.

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#23 Post by Mr Sausage » Mon Feb 13, 2006 3:19 pm

cafeman wrote:Hurrah! Another Ginger and Fred admirer.
You may add me to that list. A rather touching little piece.

atcolomb
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2004 3:49 pm
Location: Round Lake, Illinois USA

#24 Post by atcolomb » Mon Feb 13, 2006 3:36 pm

Add me to Ginger and Fred and i did like Intervista. To me i would watch an ok Fellini film than watch today's crap that comes out of Hollywood!!!

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jorencain
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 1:45 am

#25 Post by jorencain » Sat Feb 18, 2006 8:59 am

...its nostalgia for the glory days of the variety show is more assumed than explored: things were better back in the day, modern things suck, etc.
I didn't see it that way. I saw it more about aging, and how alienated and out of place these characters felt in this society. I may have missed something, but I didn't really see a variety show vs. television commentary in there. It's a different Rome than in their youth. Sure, it's dirtier, capitalism has taken over (through all the ads and everyone's fixation on TV), and these characters aren't a part of that world. To me, it didn't seem that Fellini was really out to make a satire of TV; his films are always about the characters, and the world around them is a cartoonish backdrop. Like all Fellini films, most of the cast is a freakshow, so I also don't think he's making any commentary on modern society in that sense.

Again, I agree about the non-interesting use of color and cinematography (particularly after "And The Ship Sails On", which I love the look of), but it seems we are looking at/for different things in the content of the film.

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