TV of 2019

Discuss TV shows old and new.
Post Reply
Message
Author

User avatar
diamonds
Joined: Sun Apr 24, 2016 2:35 pm

Re: TV of 2019

#2 Post by diamonds » Sun Jan 06, 2019 11:42 pm


User avatar
domino harvey
Dot Com Dom
Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:42 pm

Re: TV of 2019

#3 Post by domino harvey » Mon Jan 07, 2019 12:49 am

TV should always so directly appeal to my interests

User avatar
cantinflas
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2007 1:48 am
Location: sydney

Re: TV of 2019

#4 Post by cantinflas » Tue Mar 26, 2019 7:19 pm

Lukas Moodysson's new show Gösta starts filming
Vilhelm Blomgren makes his TV drama debut in the eight-part series written and directed by Lukas Moodysson for Memfis Film.

In Moodysson’s upcoming TV series, he plays 28-year old child psychologist Gösta who gets his first job in a small rural town. He wants to be the kindest person in the world and help everyone he meets, but it doesn’t always go according to plan.

User avatar
domino harvey
Dot Com Dom
Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:42 pm

Re: TV of 2019

#5 Post by domino harvey » Tue Mar 26, 2019 7:51 pm

Nice. Hopefully this continues the return to form of We Are the Best



User avatar
ianthemovie
Joined: Sat Apr 18, 2009 10:51 am
Location: Boston, MA
Contact:

Re: Netflix Originals and Other Exclusives

#8 Post by ianthemovie » Sat Apr 20, 2019 8:40 pm

(Not sure if this is the correct thread for this...) Anybody else watching The Act on Hulu? I was leery that this would just be a piece of tabloid exploitation, but it's quite well made and genuinely chilling in spots. It's much savvier and clearer-eyed than, say, a similarly-flavored movie like Room, which I found to be unredeemably manipulative misery-porn. I appreciate the attempt to contextualize the story of Dee Dee and Gypsy through references to Disney, children's films, and other forms of media and pop culture (Twilight, superhero comics, Bravo reality TV programming, YouTube make-up tutorials, etc.), a toxic diet that little Gypsy consumes and absorbs as steadily as the blend of food and drugs that get pumped into her feeding tube. I was also impressed with the show's unwillingness to really go dark; at about the Episode 4 mark it really steers into surreal horror-movie territory (complete with Argento-influenced shots of the main character dressed in Disney-princess garb seen through lurid red-and-blue gel lighting, etc.). Oh and the story is sheer batshit insanity.



User avatar
cantinflas
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2007 1:48 am
Location: sydney

Re: TV of 2019

#11 Post by cantinflas » Fri May 31, 2019 1:03 am


User avatar
Reverend Drewcifer
Joined: Sat Mar 09, 2013 5:16 pm
Location: Cincinnati

Re: TV of 2019

#12 Post by Reverend Drewcifer » Tue Jun 04, 2019 4:49 pm

The HBO miniseries Chernobyl is currently #1 on the imdb Top 250 TV of all time at the moment. Recency bias aside, I think it belongs at or near the top.

https://www.imdb.com/chart/toptv/

User avatar
Lost Highway
Joined: Thu Aug 29, 2013 7:41 am
Location: Berlin, Germany

Re: TV of 2019

#13 Post by Lost Highway » Thu Jun 06, 2019 11:34 am

Reverend Drewcifer wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 4:49 pm
The HBO miniseries Chernobyl is currently #1 on the imdb Top 250 TV of all time at the moment. Recency bias aside, I think it belongs at or near the top.

https://www.imdb.com/chart/toptv/
Binged that over the last couple of evenings. There is way too much competition to declare it the greatest TV show ever and at times the dialogue is a little clunky but it’s fantastic all the same. The physical efforts and sacrifices made to contain the disaster is as close to a glimpse of hell ever depicted.

User avatar
Reverend Drewcifer
Joined: Sat Mar 09, 2013 5:16 pm
Location: Cincinnati

Re: TV of 2019

#14 Post by Reverend Drewcifer » Thu Jun 06, 2019 11:52 am

When Chernobyl was first announced as a miniseries with Craig Mazin as the Writer/Creator, I was hugely disappointed. This story always seemed like an ideal opportunity to make a boots-on-the-ground war film about the Liquidators struggling against a variety of crises, or maybe something with the tone of Come and See. Mazin's previous credits were also seriously uninspiring. It seemed that his only positive contribution to the culture was his Twitter feed, where he ridiculed his former roommate Ted Cruz (!). That he pulled this off at such a high level, and that the miniseries format worked, means I was proved doubly wrong, and I was more than happy to be wrong in this case. This hearkens back to a very special window of time when HBO original movies and miniseries were leveraging genuine masters like John Frankenheimer and craftsmen like Joseph Sargent, Roger Spottiswoode, and Chris Gerolmo to make damn good movies.

User avatar
Lost Highway
Joined: Thu Aug 29, 2013 7:41 am
Location: Berlin, Germany

Re: TV of 2019

#15 Post by Lost Highway » Thu Jun 06, 2019 12:06 pm

It’s certainly a step up after Scary Movie 3&4 and The Hangover 2&3. I read an article where Mazin cited Come and See as a major influence on the series.

User avatar
Lost Highway
Joined: Thu Aug 29, 2013 7:41 am
Location: Berlin, Germany

Re: TV of 2019

#16 Post by Lost Highway » Fri Jun 07, 2019 10:28 am

I’ve started to listen to The Chernobyl Podcast which is an excellent companion piece to the series.

dda1996a
Joined: Tue Oct 27, 2015 6:14 am

Re: TV of 2019

#17 Post by dda1996a » Fri Jun 07, 2019 11:00 am

Has anyone here been watching Gregg Araki's Now Apocalypse?

User avatar
Lost Highway
Joined: Thu Aug 29, 2013 7:41 am
Location: Berlin, Germany

Re: TV of 2019

#18 Post by Lost Highway » Fri Jun 07, 2019 11:04 am

dda1996a wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 11:00 am
Has anyone here been watching Gregg Araki's Now Apocalypse?
I would rather stick forks in my eyeballs, but I’d be happy for someone to try and convince me otherwise.

dda1996a
Joined: Tue Oct 27, 2015 6:14 am

Re: TV of 2019

#19 Post by dda1996a » Fri Jun 07, 2019 12:37 pm

I finished episode three. It's basically Kaboom and Nowhere but in L.A, and focused more on actors. I'm rather fond of Araki when he is in his weird mode like those two films (less so of his other films with the exception of the great Mysterious Skin) and so far it's pretty pleasant in it's portrayal of the entire gender and sexual spectrum. I won't be able to convince you if you hate the guy, but it's pretty fun and I don't think there are much stuff around like this.
Also, since he mentions working on it as a prerequisite for this, but has anyone also seen Red Oaks? Remember quite liking the first episode

User avatar
thirtyframesasecond
Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2007 1:48 pm

Re: TV of 2019

#20 Post by thirtyframesasecond » Fri Jun 07, 2019 2:19 pm

I've watched the first two episodes of Chernobyl and I've been a cold sweaty wreck throughout.

User avatar
thirtyframesasecond
Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2007 1:48 pm

Re: TV of 2019

#21 Post by thirtyframesasecond » Fri Jun 07, 2019 2:23 pm

dda1996a wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 12:37 pm
I finished episode three. It's basically Kaboom and Nowhere but in L.A, and focused more on actors. I'm rather fond of Araki when he is in his weird mode like those two films (less so of his other films with the exception of the great Mysterious Skin) and so far it's pretty pleasant in it's portrayal of the entire gender and sexual spectrum. I won't be able to convince you if you hate the guy, but it's pretty fun and I don't think there are much stuff around like this.
Also, since he mentions working on it as a prerequisite for this, but has anyone also seen Red Oaks? Remember quite liking the first episode
Yeah, I liked it. Great music choices, great use of 80s/90s indie directors, well written characters (Nash the tennis coach being my favourite).

User avatar
John Cope
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2005 5:40 pm
Location: where the simulacrum is true

Re: TV of 2019

#22 Post by John Cope » Thu Jun 20, 2019 4:13 am

Finally got around to seeing Now Apocalypse and loved it which is not exactly a surprise as Araki is another I've been a fan of from way back. But he is still hit and miss with me, with his most highly regarded, Mysterious Skin, actually being among my least favorite (I think some of that may just have to do with how greatly I admire the source novel). Anyway, this series has, not surprisingly, seemingly received a pretty mixed response, especially perhaps from those who don't like to see what they consider a more regressive and juvenile Araki as opposed to the allegedly more sophisticated one of Mysterious Skin (and White Bird in a Blizzard I grudgingly suppose). But as ever this misses what is so great about Araki's broad absurdist farces, as warped mirror representations of our current reality at the very least (that's also why it doesn't matter if he includes references or dialogue that is already dated before it's even produced; it's *all* glorious kitsch after all).

This show has his usual day-glo bombast as heightened expression of states of being but there's less here that is as overtly apocalyptic as in his greatest work, The Doom Generation. Here it resides more fully on the surface and while there is continuity with his filmography this one is clearly more closely related to Kaboom! than Totally Fucked Up. But in certain ways this is also, and deceptively, an extremely observant and insightful work. As with the Refn show this is about the state of both contemporary America and the broader culture. And the length here allows for Araki to really get at a lot of details, as often unflattering as not, and recognize the difficulty of really being able to take a position for or against them. It is a remarkably bold and gutsy show to be produced right now and not just because of the relentless sexual depictions, absurdist or not, though this is, revealingly, what many if not most have fixated upon.

Post Reply