110-112, 439, 729-731 The Complete Jacques Tati

Discuss DVDs and Blu-rays released by Criterion and the films on them. If it's got a spine number, it's in here. Threads may contain spoilers.
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whaleallright
Joined: Sun Sep 25, 2005 12:56 am

Re: 110-112, 439, 729-731 The Complete Jacques Tati

#226 Post by whaleallright » Sun Jan 21, 2018 1:04 pm

mteller wrote:"Polymorphously perverse" means they derive sexual pleasure for non-genital areas of the body. Either R0lf doesn't understand the term, or he needs to make his case better.
Magic Hate Ball wrote:It does refer to the early stage of sexual development where a child (one to five, I think) finds pleasure anywhere they can
Hey, Hulot does have a suspicious amount of fun with those leather chairs....

There is definitely something childlike about the chaste, tentative flirtations between Hulot and his leading ladies; and, perhaps separately, Hulot's interactions with technology and everyday objects probably fall somewhere in the "perverse" column, though perhaps naïveté is a better term. I'm not sure dragging Freud into it is very productive, though.

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HitchcockLang
Joined: Tue May 28, 2013 1:43 pm

Re: 110-112, 439, 729-731 The Complete Jacques Tati

#227 Post by HitchcockLang » Tue Apr 17, 2018 9:26 am

Self wrote:Does anyone know of an update to the Taschen book? I tried searching for it on their website and it seems to have disappeared. Even clicking the above link takes one to the main page of Taschen.
All references to the book have vanished from Taschen's site and the Amazon listing which I had saved on my wishlist no longer has a release date and has been relegated to "Currently unavailable" status. I hope the book hasn't been totally canceled; I was so looking forward to it.

ter3
Joined: Fri May 02, 2014 4:41 am

Re: 110-112, 439, 729-731 The Complete Jacques Tati

#228 Post by ter3 » Mon Aug 06, 2018 5:10 am

The status of the Taschen book is unclear. Jonathan Rosenbaum decides to publish his writings for the book:
http://www.jonathanrosenbaum.net/?s=tati

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Mr Sausage
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Trafic (Jacques Tati, 1971)

#229 Post by Mr Sausage » Mon Mar 04, 2019 10:15 pm

DISCUSSION ENDS MONDAY, March 18th.

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Mr Sausage
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Re: Trafic (Jacques Tati, 1971)

#230 Post by Mr Sausage » Fri Mar 15, 2019 8:12 am

Who knew a Jacques Tati film could produce such deafening silence. Surely at least one person here could write a couple of sentences on why they liked it or voted for it?

dda1996a
Joined: Tue Oct 27, 2015 6:14 am

Re: Trafic (Jacques Tati, 1971)

#231 Post by dda1996a » Fri Mar 15, 2019 8:47 am

Ive only seen Playtime and Mon Oncle (and Holiday will be watched soon for school), but does anyone actually find Tati "funny"? Not a criticism, as I loved both films I've seen, but having everyone compare him to Chaplin seems foolish. Tati's films are droll, and are much more cinematically brilliant and amusing than out and out funny.

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Michael Kerpan
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Re: Trafic (Jacques Tati, 1971)

#232 Post by Michael Kerpan » Fri Mar 15, 2019 9:56 am

I found Mon Oncle _extremely_ funny -- and found Playtime and Hulot on Vacation often funny. Alas, I've seen Trafic only once, long ago -- so have little to say about it.

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aox
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Re: Trafic (Jacques Tati, 1971)

#233 Post by aox » Fri Mar 15, 2019 10:12 am

I find Tati very funny, and very much in the tradition of Lloyd, Keaton, and Chaplin. Turn off the sound for ten minutes at any point in any of his films.

Jonathan S
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Re: Trafic (Jacques Tati, 1971)

#234 Post by Jonathan S » Fri Mar 15, 2019 10:41 am

I didn't vote at all but here's a slightly abridged version of the programme note I wrote for a theatrical screening in January 1983, shortly after Tati's death. I was already familiar with the film; indeed it was the first Tati I ever saw, as for many years it was the only one available to UK TV (ITV weekend matinees, which now seems incredible!) Like many newbie film graduates, I took a rather severe view of comedies when I wrote the following piece at the age of 21 and I hadn't seen Playtime at all. Trafic now seems to me like a footnote to that much more ambitious film.

"An idiosyncratic film by any standards, Trafic is Tati's satire on the absurdities and dangers of our dependence on the motor vehicle. It's a highly digressive work, de-emphasising narrative, farcical gags and Hulot in favour of quietly observational humour. This ranges from the documentary (candid shots of bored drivers yawning and picking their noses) to the near abstract (a montage of visual patterns formed by road lines and reflections, synchronised to jazz). The film defies categorisation: the tone of (comic) failure and ultimately desolation suggest a parody of a road movie. It's often a gentle, subtle film, yet there are intimations of real danger and violence: a cruel practical joke involving a car wheel and what appears to be a crushed small dog; a life-size plaster bust smashed to bits in a multiple collision.

Hulot's disastrous trip from Paris to the Amsterdam motor show is ironically contrasted with the successful parallel journey by American astronauts to the moon. But Tati also uses this space journey - glimpsed on TV screens at various points - to emphasise our obsession with technology. There's no place for Nature in this new technological world unless it can be artificialized, as in the stage for the camping vehicle at the motor show, composed of cardboard trees and recorded bird sounds. Technology controls our lives to the point of sterile regimentation. As the film ends, pedestrians are forced to walk in geometrical lines between rows of jammed cars. But Tati implies it's only by becoming a pedestrian that we can begin to recover our human values."

(I somewhat disagree with my younger self: for all Tati's satire of technology, his films above all convey his fascination with it - and I suspect he'd have loved the digital age!)

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whaleallright
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Re: 110-112, 439, 729-731 The Complete Jacques Tati

#235 Post by whaleallright » Wed Mar 20, 2019 11:54 pm

So that announced Taschen book absolutely disappeared. I had forgotten about it, and then got all sad again thinking I will never own a model of the house from Mon oncle.

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