54-61, 80-83 Hammer Volumes 1-3: Fear Warning, Criminal Intent, Blood & Terror

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MichaelB
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Re: 54-61; 80-83 Hammer: Volumes One, Two and Three

#26 Post by MichaelB » Thu May 03, 2018 10:08 am

tenia wrote:
MichaelB wrote:The Day the Earth Caught Fire
I have to say this one is one of my best recent discovery. I knew nothing of it before, and am wondering why because it's a tremendously well-made movie.
That's probably his best film (and that's far from a minority opinion), but most of his output from the mid-50s to the mid-60s is solid at least and sometimes several distinct notches above that.

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Dr Amicus
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Re: 54-61; 80-83 Hammer: Volumes One, Two and Three

#27 Post by Dr Amicus » Thu May 03, 2018 10:23 am

I'm sure David Pirie really liked Stranglers of Bombay and there's a good write up about it in Heritage of Horror, but my copy is easily to hand so I might be confusing it with, e.g. Wheeler Winston Dixon's book on Fisher.

Haven't seen Blood Island (or it's sequel) but I think this was one where the novelisation far outstripped the original film and was in print for about 30 years or so.

I'd agree with MichaelB on Guest - had I stayed in academia I was planning a research project on him and his films. He was due to come to Brighton in the early 2000s for a screening of Jigsaw, but he couldn't make it (on health grounds IIRC).

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MichaelB
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Re: 54-61; 80-83 Hammer: Volumes One, Two and Three

#28 Post by MichaelB » Thu May 03, 2018 10:26 am

Dr Amicus wrote:He was due to come to Brighton in the early 2000s for a screening of Jigsaw, but he couldn't make it (on health grounds IIRC).
I was at that very screening! And watching it in glorious black-and-white Scope with a large and vocally local audience was a real treat.

(For those who don't know, it's a police procedural set in and around Brighton, so with tons of opportunities for audibly recognising locations. I seem to recall that it was also very interesting for the almost documentary level of detail as to what a police investigation entails, with one poor copper being charged with ringing up hundreds of people in order to follow up a possibly fruitless lead.)

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Ribs
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Re: 54-61; 80-83 Hammer: Volumes One, Two and Three

#29 Post by Ribs » Thu May 03, 2018 11:11 am

Yesterday's Enemy was written by Peter R. Newman, who was a longstanding mystery in the relatively exhaustively researched realm of Dr. Who history as someone who had basically just the credit for this one film and one of the very first Doctor Who serials and no one knew who he really was or what happened to him. There's a wonderful feature about him "unraveling" the mystery (it's a far more boring explanation than the setup was probably worth, but it does result in them being able to express to his family for the first time that people still care about his work) on the DVD for that Dr. Who serial, The Sensorites. So that's a point of interest for some that's got me a little more interested in that particular film.

I've only watched the first half of the second Hammer set but this set seems to be continuing in that general sphere which by all means is more than welcome - the second set is basically exactly my kind of movies and this generally seems more in that sphere than the horror-oriented set(s) (which I also like, just not as much!)

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GaryC
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Re: 54-61; 80-83 Hammer: Volumes One, Two and Three

#30 Post by GaryC » Thu May 03, 2018 2:24 pm

Dr Amicus wrote:The only one of Volume 3 I've seen is Yesterday's Enemy which is really interesting - and another example of Guest's impressive use of widescreen. I caught it about 15 years ago at a Hammer day (I think it was the launch for Wayne Kinsey's Bray Studio Years book) in a lovely 35mm print and it looked stunning.

IIRC it was a radio play originally - anyone know if it still exists anywhere?
I can't see anything on BBC Genome for Yesterday's Enemy as a radio play, but it certainly was a television play, broadcast 14 October 1958 and now lost - incidentally, directed by Chloe Gibson (credited as producer) who may well have been the first woman to direct for the BBC. Given the time, it's quite possible the play was broadcast live and never recorded in the first place. I believe, but I'm not certain, that Peter R. Newman rewrote it as a stage play as well.

I too saw the featurette on Newman on the Sensorites DVD that Ribs refers to. Apparently Newman suffered from severe writers' block, which is one reason why Yesterday's Enemy and that Who serial are almost his only IMDB credits. The cause of his death was listed as suicide in some reference books, but the featurette establishes that that was not the case.

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MichaelB
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Re: 54-61, 80-83 Hammer Volumes 1-3: Fear Warning, Criminal Intent, Blood & Terror

#31 Post by MichaelB » Tue Jul 03, 2018 11:56 am

Full specs announced for volume 3:

The Camp on Blood Island

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Yesterday's Enemy

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The Stranglers of Bombay

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The Terror of the Tongs

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