40 The Reckoning

Discuss Blu-rays released by Indicator and the films on them.

Moderator: MichaelB

Post Reply
Message
Author
User avatar
MichaelB
Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:20 pm
Location: Worthing
Contact:

Re: Indicator

#1 Post by MichaelB » Wed Jun 07, 2017 5:49 am

Image
THE RECKONING
£15.99

PRE-ORDER NOW: THIS ITEM WILL BE RELEASED ON 21 AUGUST 2017, BUT YOU CAN PRE-ORDER IT NOW TO BE GUARANTEED A COPY. PLEASE NOTE THAT YOUR PAYMENT WILL BE TAKEN IMMEDIATELY, AND THE ITEM WILL SHIP JUST BEFORE THE RELEASE DATE.

(Jack Gold, 1969)
Release date: 21 August 2017
Limited Dual Format Edition (Blu-ray premiere / UK DVD premiere)

A ruthless business executive (an intense tour de force performance by leading man Nicol Williamson) returns home to his Liverpool roots to investigate his father’s death. An unflinching exploration of the British class system, Jack Gold's penetrating, brutal drama stands alongside contemporary classics Up the Junction and Room at the Top, and prefigures Get Carter by several years. Underrated and underexposed, The Reckoning may well be one of the most essential British films ever made.

Available for the first time ever in the UK.

INDICATOR LIMITED EDITION SPECIAL FEATURES:
• High Definition remaster
• Original mono audio
• Audio commentary
• New interview with actor Ann Bell (2017, tbc mins)
• Original theatrical trailer
• Image gallery: on-set and promotional photography
• New English subtitles for the deaf and hard-of-hearing
• Limited edition exclusive booklet with a new essay by Michael Pattison, an overview of contemporary critical responses, and historic articles on the film
• World premiere on Blu-ray
• UK DVD premiere
• Limited Dual Format Edition of 3,000 copies
• More TBC

#PHIDFE040
BBFC cert: TBC
REGION FREE
EAN: 5037899071199

User avatar
Der Spieler
Joined: Fri Oct 16, 2009 11:05 am

Re: Indicator

#2 Post by Der Spieler » Sun Aug 20, 2017 11:32 am

Ribs wrote:Beaver now chimes in again on Joe Egg & The Reckoning
What's the consensus on The Reckoning? Is it worthy of a blind buy?

User avatar
MichaelB
Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:20 pm
Location: Worthing
Contact:

Re: Indicator

#3 Post by MichaelB » Sun Aug 20, 2017 11:46 am

Der Spieler wrote:What's the consensus on The Reckoning? Is it worthy of a blind buy?
Put it like this: you can argue till the cows come home which of The Reckoning or Get Carter is more resonant a portrait of a man who finds himself confronted by his past when he's unexpectedly called north (to Liverpool/Newcastle) because of a family bereavement, but there's no question that they're not so far apart that one deserved to become a major cultural icon that still gleams brightly nearly half a century later while the other has been all but forgotten.

Both Mike Hodges (Get Carter) and Jack Gold/screenwriter John McGrath (The Reckoning) had very similar ambitions to inject a note of hard-nosed realism into genres that more often tended towards silly melodrama, and both Michael Caine and Nicol Williamson deliver hugely charismatic performances - although Williamson doesn't try at any point to ingratiate himself with the audience, which may have been part of the problem. He's absolutely riveting to watch from beginning to end, but his Michael Marler is a very tough character to actually like.

User avatar
Der Spieler
Joined: Fri Oct 16, 2009 11:05 am

Re: Indicator

#4 Post by Der Spieler » Sun Aug 20, 2017 2:44 pm

MichaelB wrote:
Der Spieler wrote:What's the consensus on The Reckoning? Is it worthy of a blind buy?
Put it like this: you can argue till the cows come home which of The Reckoning or Get Carter is more resonant a portrait of a man who finds himself confronted by his past when he's unexpectedly called north (to Liverpool/Newcastle) because of a family bereavement, but there's no question that they're not so far apart that one deserved to become a major cultural icon that still gleams brightly nearly half a century later while the other has been all but forgotten.

Both Mike Hodges (Get Carter) and Jack Gold/screenwriter John McGrath (The Reckoning) had very similar ambitions to inject a note of hard-nosed realism into genres that more often tended towards silly melodrama, and both Michael Caine and Nicol Williamson deliver hugely charismatic performances - although Williamson doesn't try at any point to ingratiate himself with the audience, which may have been part of the problem. He's absolutely riveting to watch from beginning to end, but his Michael Marler is a very tough character to actually like.
Thanks for the comments! For what it's worth I absolutely loved Get Carter, so I think I'll give this one a try.

User avatar
antnield
Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2005 1:59 pm
Location: Cheltenham, England

Re: Indicator

#5 Post by antnield » Fri Aug 25, 2017 8:47 am

M Sanderson wrote:I was certain I'd read about The Reckoning in Sight & Sound's feature for films unreleased on home digital video, but am struggling to find the issue.
July 2015. The author of that piece, Michael Pattinson, is also responsible for the booklet essay in the Indicator release.

M Sanderson
Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2016 3:43 am

Re: Indicator

#6 Post by M Sanderson » Fri Aug 25, 2017 2:43 pm

Excellent, thanks for that.

User avatar
peerpee
not perpee
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 3:41 pm

Re: Indicator

#7 Post by peerpee » Fri Aug 25, 2017 3:18 pm

I was extremely impressed and thrilled by THE RECKONING. Up there with PERFORMANCE and GET CARTER for me.

User avatar
MichaelB
Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:20 pm
Location: Worthing
Contact:

Indicator

#8 Post by MichaelB » Sat Aug 26, 2017 4:59 am

Blueprint Review on The Reckoning.
This violent temperament, on top of a few short bursts of action (including some terrifyingly dangerous driving sequences) and an occasionally quite punchy editing style, make for an incredibly intense film, which is pretty impressive considering the film is really just about a businessman travelling up north to see his dead father.

User avatar
NABOB OF NOWHERE
Joined: Thu Sep 01, 2005 12:30 pm
Location: Brandywine River

Re: Indicator

#9 Post by NABOB OF NOWHERE » Sat Aug 26, 2017 5:06 am

MichaelB wrote:Blueprint Review on The Reckoning.
This violent temperament, on top of a few short bursts of action (including some terrifyingly dangerous driving sequences) and an occasionally quite punchy editing style, make for an incredibly intense film, which is pretty impressive considering the film is really just about a businessman travelling up north to see his dead father.
One thing did jump out in this review , namely the reference to "Anglo-Saxon Teddy boys" . As opposed to what ? Viking teddy boys?

User avatar
MichaelB
Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:20 pm
Location: Worthing
Contact:

Indicator

#10 Post by MichaelB » Sat Aug 26, 2017 5:07 am

I suspect this is to firmly establish that they don't share Mick's Irish heritage (which could hardly be more dramatically significant in the relevant context), but were there any Irish Teddy Boys?

User avatar
NABOB OF NOWHERE
Joined: Thu Sep 01, 2005 12:30 pm
Location: Brandywine River

Re: Indicator

#11 Post by NABOB OF NOWHERE » Sat Aug 26, 2017 7:38 am

MichaelB wrote:I suspect this is to firmly establish that they don't share Mick's Irish heritage (which could hardly be more dramatically significant in the relevant context), but were there any Irish Teddy Boys?
Yes . My Dad (from Kilrush) who did literally have blue suede shoes.

User avatar
MichaelB
Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:20 pm
Location: Worthing
Contact:

Re: Indicator

#12 Post by MichaelB » Sat Aug 26, 2017 8:45 am

Well, there you go.

User avatar
MichaelB
Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:20 pm
Location: Worthing
Contact:

Re: Indicator

#13 Post by MichaelB » Thu Oct 12, 2017 6:55 am

tenia wrote:I'd however be wary of using too many very dated hd masters. I know not everything is lavishly restored, and I know some movies might be perceived as worthy of a re-release, but something like The Reckoning HD master is really borderline HD worthy.
The Reckoning had never previously had a video release on any format in its native country, so it was absolutely worth doing. Yes, it's not exactly a 4K restoration (and neither is a film like that ever likely to get one, unless the Indicator release belatedly turns it into a major cult hit), but on its own terms it's perfectly watchable.

You have to be pragmatic about these things - if we obsessively prioritised picture quality above all else, a key part of the raison d'être of the Indicator label (namely, rescuing and showcasing undeservedly neglected films) would evaporate. I mainly freelance for Powerhouse and Second Run these days, and both labels have more in common philosophically than you might think from glancing at their catalogues. Indeed, I was rather tickled by the fact that both labels were putting out Ray Harryhausen and Karel Zeman releases more or less simultaneously.

(True, Second Run could still get away with a VHS-quality master in a way that Powerhouse emphatically couldn't, but with a major studio library you expect minimum technical standards in a way that you don't with ultra-obscure eastern European films that haven't had a fresh telecine for decades.)

User avatar
tenia
Ask Me About My Bassoon
Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 11:13 am

Re: Indicator

#14 Post by tenia » Thu Oct 12, 2017 8:25 am

MichaelB wrote:The Reckoning had never previously had a video release on any format in its native country, so it was absolutely worth doing. Yes, it's not exactly a 4K restoration, but on its own terms it's perfectly watchable.
I understand the difficulties of having to deal with this kind of pragmatism, but I suppose many people buying Indicator's DFs releases certainly are doing so for the BD disc (as Indicator themselves said when switching to BD-only releases) and this certainly comes with certain technical expectations (and one could argue “perfectly watchable” could be insufficient). Why then not releasing the movie just on DVD if it’s to otherwise release a mediocre-at-best BD ?

That's the consumer nuance I wanted to provide. It's not so much a question of obsessively prioritise PQ, but rather a question of making sure that if you're selling a movie on a superior video format, the capacities of this superior format are adequately used. With some dated HD masters, it just isn't the case.

Regarding The Reckoning specifically, if I had to give it a grade, I’d probably give it something like 5.5 out of 10. That’s not what I expect of a BD. I’m OK with something going down to, say, 7 out of 10 (which doesn’t need a brand new 4K OCN restoration to reach), I'd still believe my money is well spent, but otherwise, it might not feel so, hence my concern. For instance, I’m OK with some old HD masters like Day of the Jackal, Le samourai, Mickey One, Brute Force or others, they feel OK enough to warrant a BD release. But Dark Water, The Reckoning, Sword of Doom ?

I'm not saying it's an easy decision to make for the labels and I don't want to belittle some of these decisions (though I'm certain some labels just don't care at all, and those should be pointed ou). I'm just saying that, from a BD-buyer point of view, using such type of material might dilute the will to purchase the release because in the majority of the cases, I could have just got the DVD for cheaper.

Jack Phillips
Joined: Mon Jun 25, 2007 2:33 am

Re: Indicator

#15 Post by Jack Phillips » Thu Oct 12, 2017 10:30 am

tenia wrote:
MichaelB wrote:The Reckoning had never previously had a video release on any format in its native country, so it was absolutely worth doing. Yes, it's not exactly a 4K restoration, but on its own terms it's perfectly watchable.
I understand the difficulties of having to deal with this kind of pragmatism, but I suppose many people buying Indicator's DFs releases certainly are doing so for the BD disc (as Indicator themselves said when switching to BD-only releases) and this certainly comes with certain technical expectations (and one could argue “perfectly watchable” could be insufficient). Why then not releasing the movie just on DVD if it’s to otherwise release a mediocre-at-best BD ?

That's the consumer nuance I wanted to provide. It's not so much a question of obsessively prioritise PQ, but rather a question of making sure that if you're selling a movie on a superior video format, the capacities of this superior format are adequately used. With some dated HD masters, it just isn't the case.

Regarding The Reckoning specifically, if I had to give it a grade, I’d probably give it something like 5.5 out of 10. That’s not what I expect of a BD. I’m OK with something going down to, say, 7 out of 10 (which doesn’t need a brand new 4K OCN restoration to reach), I'd still believe my money is well spent, but otherwise, it might not feel so, hence my concern. For instance, I’m OK with some old HD masters like Day of the Jackal, Le samourai, Mickey One, Brute Force or others, they feel OK enough to warrant a BD release. But Dark Water, The Reckoning, Sword of Doom ?

I'm not saying it's an easy decision to make for the labels and I don't want to belittle some of these decisions (though I'm certain some labels just don't care at all, and those should be pointed ou). I'm just saying that, from a BD-buyer point of view, using such type of material might dilute the will to purchase the release because in the majority of the cases, I could have just got the DVD for cheaper.
This is spot on. I have the Region 1 DVD of The Reckoning and was seriously considering what I thought was going to be an upgrade. After reading reviews and comments, I realized I would do well to simply stick with what I had. Had I not had that information--had I purchased the Blu-ray disc in ignorance only to discover for myself its lackluster quality--I would have been seriously annoyed. Now I realize I cannot blind buy Indicator product. As much as I like, say, The Pumpkin Eater, I won't be purchasing that until I know for certain the BD is offering a significant visual upgrade.

User avatar
Slaphappy
Joined: Fri Apr 27, 2018 5:08 am

Re: 40 The Reckoning

#16 Post by Slaphappy » Sun Sep 09, 2018 7:25 am

Recommended for fans of Shock to the System and the corporate sociopath/anti-hero -genre as well as fans of Get Carter and vigilante movies.

Post Reply