Stephen King on Film

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barryconvex
Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2012 10:08 pm
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Re: Stephen King on Film

#76 Post by barryconvex » Thu May 31, 2018 2:08 am

Murdoch wrote:
Fri Mar 30, 2018 11:15 am
I'll have to try my hat at one of his many other books that are collecting dust on my shelves.
Can i recommend The Stand? It's King's magnum opus and the godfather of every "plague kills off the entire world" story we've seen over the past 15 years or so. King wisely eschews the zombies, instead going for archetypes (or at times cliches, the book's not perfect) with his choice of characters.

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Big Ben
Joined: Mon Feb 08, 2016 12:54 pm
Location: Great Falls, Montana

Re: Stephen King on Film

#77 Post by Big Ben » Thu May 31, 2018 3:12 am

barryconvex wrote:
Thu May 31, 2018 2:08 am
Murdoch wrote:
Fri Mar 30, 2018 11:15 am
I'll have to try my hat at one of his many other books that are collecting dust on my shelves.
Can i recommend The Stand? It's King's magnum opus and the godfather of every "plague kills off the entire world" story we've seen over the past 15 years or so. King wisely eschews the zombies, instead going for archetypes (or at times cliches, the book's not perfect) with his choice of characters.
It also features of King's best recurring characters, the villain Randall Flagg. Won't spoil anymore than that. He's worth it!

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colinr0380
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 4:30 pm
Location: Chapel-en-le-Frith, Derbyshire, UK

Re: Stephen King on Film

#78 Post by colinr0380 » Thu May 31, 2018 3:28 am

barryconvex wrote:
Thu May 31, 2018 2:01 am
A redemption for being a somewhat aloof husband at least, if not a murderer...
I always thought the redemption was Red's. He transforms from an embittered, world weary convict into a man who has some hope for the future by the end. Hope, being the movie's big theme...
That's true, its really his story as the narrator of Andy's tale to the audience and from whose perspective we are shown the action. Even Andy's escape scene has Red commenting that he cannot really imagine what it must have been like to have crawled through the sewer pipe! Suggesting the slightly detached, less visceral nature of the reminiscence (as with the relatively discreet recounting of the gang rape scenes early on). Andy is a 'larger than life' character in some ways, somewhat unknowable although he seems to take pride in a job well done and sharing the joy of learning. Perhaps he has to be larger than life, as he is the only 'innocent' person there and, as you say, it seems telling that instead of the audience totally identifying with Andy we are placed more in the slightly outsider perspective of (actually guilty, though paying a heavy price for his juvenile crime) Red, which is perhaps a more believable perspective! (It is also perhaps something that emphasises the Biblical allegory sense running through the film, as instead of following the Jesus-figure directly we are shown his goodness through the perspective of his Apostles and the effect that he has on them! Much as in The Green Mile we are shown John Coffey's tormented by taking on the burden of all the evil and disease in the world Jesus figure filtered through the perspective of the guards who have to execute him, like the Roman soldiers in the crucifixion)

Red's story in some ways is probably the bigger tragedy too as a 'normal' prisoner, not having escaped from jail just lived almost his entire life there (and got an actual valued place in that prison society) until the parole board seems to see that they have broken him down completely, at which point he is released! That is probably why we get that extended digression into Brooks's tragic, hopeless, friendless and purposeless post-prison life which ends in suicide, and why it plays out almost exactly the same as Red's (even to the extent of having the same job and getting on that chair!), suggesting that in Red's recounting that he equates himself with Brooks to some extent, just is able to keep going slightly longer. But he probably would have ended up the same way if he did not have a bigger goal in life to focus on and carry him through the otherwise uncaring and occasionally callously brutal world. The horror of having to endure without the possibility of end or respite seems like a big Stephen King theme, and it shows up here both in its most tragic forms and eventually in its hopeful one.
Last edited by colinr0380 on Sat Jun 02, 2018 11:44 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Murdoch
Joined: Sun Apr 20, 2008 11:59 pm
Location: Upstate NY

Re: Stephen King on Film

#79 Post by Murdoch » Fri Jun 01, 2018 1:43 pm

barryconvex wrote:
Thu May 31, 2018 2:08 am
Murdoch wrote:
Fri Mar 30, 2018 11:15 am
I'll have to try my hat at one of his many other books that are collecting dust on my shelves.
Can i recommend The Stand? It's King's magnum opus and the godfather of every "plague kills off the entire world" story we've seen over the past 15 years or so. King wisely eschews the zombies, instead going for archetypes (or at times cliches, the book's not perfect) with his choice of characters.
I'm working through a few of King's short stories to start, like The Raft. His prose style is the big sticking point for me so I'm trying to ease in slowly rather than jump into the massive tomes, but thanks for the recommendation! I may someday tackle The Stand but I'm not in a rush.

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domino harvey
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Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:42 pm

Re: Stephen King on Film

#80 Post by domino harvey » Fri Jun 01, 2018 1:47 pm

The Stand is one of two King books I read when I was younger that I thought about revisiting as an adult, but I didn't get very far in it when I tried to reread it, and my experience successfully rereading IT was underwhelming

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Lost Highway
Joined: Thu Aug 29, 2013 7:41 am
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Re: Stephen King on Film

#81 Post by Lost Highway » Fri Jun 01, 2018 1:51 pm

I wouldn’t start with The Stand, it’s good but rather unwieldy and an odd mix of horror, science fiction, fantasy and Christian allegory and the end is rather corny (even more so in the mini series which has to visualize a silly concept). I think The Shining and Salem’s Lot are his best early novels and Misery is great mid-period King. The Green Mile was the last of his novels I read all the way through.

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Rayon Vert
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Re: Stephen King on Film

#82 Post by Rayon Vert » Fri Jun 01, 2018 3:35 pm

I read everything King wrote (up to that time) in my teens , between 82 and 86, including the Bachman books. The last one I read was Skeleton Crew. Then I remember starting It, not being able to get into it at all (I think I started reading literature around then) and never reading anything from him afterwards. I remember The Stand as a favourite, but also having a particular fondness for Christine.

Even at those early ages I remember being struck by the fact that the paranormal horror was always accompanied or mirrored by a depiction of regular middle-class, suburban life ‘horror’ (messy divorces, alcoholism, etc) and of course the horrors of life as a teenage misfit.

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Lost Highway
Joined: Thu Aug 29, 2013 7:41 am
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Re: Stephen King on Film

#83 Post by Lost Highway » Sat Jun 02, 2018 6:04 am

Amy Seimetz got cast in the Pet Sematary remake and I'm suddenly mildly excited about it. The Mary Lambert movie from the 80s is utter trash. Like the IT mini-series it has an undeservedly good reputation due to a generation of kids being traumatized by one aspect of an otherwise threadbare Stephen King adaptation. In this case the scary thing everybody is still talking about, isn't even related to the main plot line of the movie. After reading a lot of online praise for it, I even gave the movie another try not too long ago and it hasn't improved. This was always a prime contender for a remake which doesn't even have to be very good to improve on the previous film.

One of the baffling decisions of the 80s movie was to cast the most wooden actress of her generation in a role which should be emotionally demanding. Casting Seimetz is a good move, I've liked her in everything I've seen her in.

I wasn't a fan of Starry Eyes, the movie which put the remake directors Kevin Kölsch and Dennis Widmyer on the map. It promised to be a showbiz take on Rosemary's Baby and had an intriguing first 30 minutes, only to give up on narrative momentum to become a repetitive slasher movie, with nobody to invest in. Hopefully with a decent screenplay, that won't happen here. They managed to display flashes of style in their previous movie.

https://variety.com/2018/film/news/amy- ... 202825487/

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Big Ben
Joined: Mon Feb 08, 2016 12:54 pm
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Re: Stephen King on Film

#84 Post by Big Ben » Sat Jun 02, 2018 10:25 am

I only ever saw the original version on Television and it sure spooked me as a kid. Revisiting the novel however revealed certain aspects, particularly the Native American angle had been left out. Hoping to see an appearance of that (Minor) Wendigo in the new film.


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Monterey Jack
Joined: Fri Jan 12, 2018 1:27 am

Re: Stephen King on Film

#86 Post by Monterey Jack » Tue Apr 02, 2019 8:54 am

Surprisingly high Tomatometer for the Pet Sematary remake, so I'm fairly excited. The 80's film was garbage (re-visited last week, and it's aged horribly. Only Fred Gwynne's impeccable performance works in a garish film that plods), but King's book is one of the scariest he's ever written, so I've been dying for a proper take on it for decades, even if this new version takes a few more liberties with the text. I greatly enjoyed the directors' last film, Starry Eyes, and it's always a treat when Christopher Young gets to score a horror movie.

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DarkImbecile
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Re: Stephen King on Film

#87 Post by DarkImbecile » Thu Apr 18, 2019 4:31 pm



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