How to Pronounce Your Favorite Director's Name

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Finch
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2008 5:09 pm
Location: Edinburgh, UK

Re: Kino Lorber Studio Classics Acquisitions

#476 Post by Finch » Sat Nov 02, 2019 4:21 pm

Kauno wrote:
Sat Nov 02, 2019 3:29 pm
I have heard that Japanese find Finnish interesting because Finnish and Japanese are the two languages that are hardest to learn. Your Korean connection is new to me. Man, this is deep off topic.
I thought Chinese was more difficult to master than Japanese, no?

Kauno
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2011 4:01 am

Re: Kino Lorber Studio Classics Acquisitions

#477 Post by Kauno » Sat Nov 02, 2019 4:34 pm

Finch wrote:
Sat Nov 02, 2019 4:21 pm
I thought Chinese was more difficult to master than Japanese, no?
Apparently no. No idea of Japanese and I can't read kanji, but Finnish is suicidal.

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MichaelB
Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:20 pm
Location: Worthing
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Re: Kino Lorber Studio Classics Acquisitions

#478 Post by MichaelB » Sat Nov 02, 2019 4:42 pm

My Polish friends assure me that Polish is the hardest language to learn.

(It's certainly the hardest language that I've ever tried to learn - the grammar is a nightmare!)

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zedz
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2004 7:24 pm

Re: Kino Lorber Studio Classics Acquisitions

#479 Post by zedz » Sat Nov 02, 2019 4:52 pm

Further to Michael’s post. The same applies to feminised surnames in Russian, like Kira Muratova. Her first husband’s name was MuRATov, so hers is MuRATova.

In general, with multiply syllabled Russian names, you’re generally correct if you put the emphasis on the penultimate syllable. (Doesn’t apply to all Russian names, like TolSTOY or ZVYAgintsev, unfortunately, or Russians with non-Russian names, like Eisenstein!). E.g PuDOVkin, KalaTOZov, ParaDZHANov. And it’s VlaDIMir NaBOKov, not whatever you heard from Sting or Nick Cave.

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MichaelB
Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:20 pm
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Re: Kino Lorber Studio Classics Acquisitions

#480 Post by MichaelB » Sat Nov 02, 2019 4:53 pm

And of course Battleship PotYOMkin.

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Shrew
The Untamed One
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 2:22 am

Re: Kino Lorber Studio Classics Acquisitions

#481 Post by Shrew » Sat Nov 02, 2019 6:36 pm

Kauno wrote:
Finch wrote:
Sat Nov 02, 2019 4:21 pm
I thought Chinese was more difficult to master than Japanese, no?
Apparently no. No idea of Japanese and I can't read kanji, but Finnish is suicidal.
Chinese is hard to pronounce because it's a tone language and has some sounds you don't see in the West (the sh, zh, ch, r group), but its grammar is pretty flexible and usually straight s-v-o with no tenses or conjugation. Japanese is far easier to pronounce but its grammar is s-o-v and you have various conjugations, some of them involving social register. Plus the kanji can have multiple pronunciations depending on the context. I found Chinese much easier.

I hadn't heard the theory about Finnish/Hungarian being related to Japanese/Korean, but there is a theory that the latter two are related to Turkish because of the grammar.

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Mr Sausage
Not PETA approved
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 9:02 pm
Location: Canada

Re: Kino Lorber Studio Classics Acquisitions

#482 Post by Mr Sausage » Sat Nov 02, 2019 6:46 pm

zedz wrote:
Sat Nov 02, 2019 4:52 pm
Further to Michael’s post. The same applies to feminised surnames in Russian, like Kira Muratova. Her first husband’s name was MuRATov, so hers is MuRATova.

In general, with multiply syllabled Russian names, you’re generally correct if you put the emphasis on the penultimate syllable. (Doesn’t apply to all Russian names, like TolSTOY or ZVYAgintsev, unfortunately, or Russians with non-Russian names, like Eisenstein!). E.g PuDOVkin, KalaTOZov, ParaDZHANov. And it’s VlaDIMir NaBOKov, not whatever you heard from Sting or Nick Cave.
Speaking of Russian names, I was surprised to learn that a name like Boris is pronounced more like bah - REESS.

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knives
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 6:49 pm

Re: Kino Lorber Studio Classics Acquisitions

#483 Post by knives » Sat Nov 02, 2019 8:35 pm

MichaelB wrote:
Sat Nov 02, 2019 12:09 pm
Florinaldo wrote:
Sat Nov 02, 2019 12:05 pm
Groupings of languages can sometimes be surprising. I remember when the now defunct international organisation called the Latin Union was still around some people were surprised to see Romania as a member, but it turns out that Romanian is indeed part of the family of Latin languages, now more commonly called Romance languages. When you listen to it being spoken, you can hear similiarities with Italian, French and others. Also, nearly all the Romanians I have know displayed a fiery character true to their sang latin (or latin blood). :wink:
Romanian is apparently closer to Latin than any other living language. And yes, it's surprisingly easy to make out the gist of written Romanian if you already know at least one of the Romance languages, especially if you swot up on a few local grammatical quirks (such as the definite article being expressed by the suffix "-ul", which is sometimes then followed by another suffix - for instance in the original title of The Child's Pose, which is Poziția copilului).
Though it underwent a few hundred years ago a drastic francophoniation as a way, or so says my Romanian aunt, to distant itself from the Russians and look more civilized to the west. This is immediate obvious with the written language which used to be in Cyrillic. My aunt's father only speaks Romanian which has given me many occasions to see this in action. With my poor spanish I'm able to actually hold something like a conversation with him so long as remember the differences (e.g. 'hai' instead of 'vai' for you go).

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