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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2017 5:11 am 
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Jeanne Moreau


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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2017 6:03 am 
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Oedipax wrote:

BFI


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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2017 9:52 am 
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Jesus María y José. Jeanne Moreau will be eternallly walking. Nobody has walked a city (Paris or Milan) like her.


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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2017 10:53 am 
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Sam Shepard


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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2017 11:04 am 
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mfunk9786 wrote:
His film career alone would be worth substantial recognition, and the fact that his cinematic work is diminutive compared to his stage contributions is stunning.


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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2017 11:15 am 
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Jesus. Jeanne Moreau and Sam Shepard on the same day. Shamefully I’ve only seen a handful of Moreau’s performances but her role in La Notte is the one that stands out for me. Sam Shepard, just a super talented guy, his part in Days Of Heaven is what comes to mind first. Excellent performance. Miss these two heavyweights.


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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2017 11:49 am 
Bringing Out El Duende
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R.I.P. Ms. Moreau


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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2017 12:11 pm 
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Luke M wrote:
Jesus. Jeanne Moreau and Sam Shepard on the same day. Shamefully I’ve only seen a handful of Moreau’s performances but her role in La Notte is the one that stands out for me. Sam Shepard, just a super talented guy, his part in Days Of Heaven is what comes to mind first. Excellent performance. Miss these two heavyweights.

Well said. Two titans lost. I've had a difficult relationship with Jules and Jim (I just really find it kind of repugnant), but Moreau's performance is by far the standout aspect of it. And Paris, Texas is one of the most beautiful films ever written.


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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2017 1:19 pm 
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His Altman collaboration, Fool for Love, is phenomenal too. For me, it's the pinnacle of Altman's theater adaptations, a perfect marriage of film and theater.

I always felt like a young Sam Sheppard as Howard Hughes would have been a perfect role.


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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2017 1:21 pm 
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Anyone who loves theatre should have a copy of Shepard's collected plays. And Moreau was of course a legend of French post-War Cinema. Two greats gone, RIP indeed


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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2017 3:01 pm 
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Location: Chapel-en-le-Frith, Derbyshire, UK
Outside of her New Wave stardom, I've always enjoyed Moreau's performance as the tough stylist/etiquette teacher/brothel madam to Anne Parillaud's La femme Nikita.

There's also that touching scene with Jeanne Moreau as the blind mother waiting for (and having motivated) William Hurt's character when the journey comes to its final destination in Wim Wenders' Until The End Of The World


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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2017 3:59 pm 
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Moreau supporting role in Les valseuses (Going Places) is unforgettable.

Sam Sephard was divorced from Jessica Lange?


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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2017 4:09 pm 
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Location: Chapel-en-le-Frith, Derbyshire, UK
I'd definitely second her character's section of Les valseuses as being very moving. An older woman's chance to experience all kinds of physical pleasures, and to be wanted, for a final time.

On Sam Shepard, I'm impressed at the range of his work: writing (I also didn't realise that he'd had input into the screenplay of Zabriske Point!), acting (notably as Chuck Yeager in The Right Stuff), and directing. As rohmerin suggests, he worked lot with Jessica Lange (acting together in Frances, Country, Crimes of the Heart and Shepard directing Lange in Far North) and they were in a long relationship though I don't think they ever married. All through the 80s Shepard had a long run of supporting role to headlining female characters played by Diane Keaton, Barbara Hershey, Lili Taylor, Sissy Spacek, Susan Sarandon, Julia Roberts and so on. Though the prime example of that was his role in the ultimate 80s 'ensemble Southen Belle women's picture', Steel Magnolias as Dolly Parton's husband!

This reminds me that the film Shepard starred in which I'd really like to see get some sort of attention at some point would be 1991's Voyager, a tale of Jungian coincidences directed by Volker Schlöndorff.


Last edited by colinr0380 on Mon Jul 31, 2017 4:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2017 4:51 pm 
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Joined: Mon Aug 07, 2006 10:36 am
Location: Spain
I read at Le Figaro that she lived in the super posh and exclusive Rue Saint Honore, pas mal, pas mal, and she died alone, discovered by the cleaning lady at 7.30. How sad.


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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2017 10:27 pm 

Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2009 7:45 pm
Sam Shephard, a legend with a hand in the writing of two of the quintessential American "road" movies: Paris, Texas and Zabriskie Point. Obviously the former bore his authorship much more fully than the latter, and unlike Zabriskie, PT has a fully coherent script that can actually stand alongside its majestic visual poetry; but both remain remarkable films in their own ways.

But his haunted, nameless farmer in Days of Heaven will always stay with me. I can barely remember his words but the images speak so much more, as does the narration that attempts to get a hold on his character.

Linda: This farmer, he had a big spread... and a lot of money. Whoever was sittin' in the chair when he'd come around... why, they'd stand up and give it to him. Wasn't no harm in him. You'd give him a flower, he'd keep it forever. He was headed for the boneyard any minute... but he wasn't really goin' around squawkin' about it... like some people. In one way, I felt sorry for him... 'cause he had nobody to stand out for him... be by his side... hold his hand when he needs attention or somethin'. That's touchin'.


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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2017 11:06 am 
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British acting stalwarts Hywel Bennett and Robert Hardy.


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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2017 12:34 pm 
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Regarding Jeanne Moreau, how could I have forgotten her fantastic performance in Luis Bunuel's 1964 version of Diary of a Chambermaid! She's the central fulcrum figure around whom all the wilder characters revolve. And then there's that stunning final scene that kind of damns the 'aspirational middle classes' even more than the decadent bourgeoisie! (or suggests that they're the new form of jaded aristos influencing right wing politics. Just with an added chip on their shoulder).

It's also got a fantastic trailer, done in the form of an interview with Moreau about the film!


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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2017 4:47 pm 
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Location: Chapel-en-le-Frith, Derbyshire, UK
MichaelB wrote:
British acting stalwarts Hywel Bennett and Robert Hardy.

It was interesting to note from imbd that Robert Hardy was apparently in a 1961 BBC version of Rashomon in the role of the husband! Lots of TV (including The Age of Kings and The Spread of the Eagle series of Shakespeare adaptations. He also turns up playing the obviously unsuitable suitor Sir Tony Belch in the 1980 version of Twelfth Night in that massive BBC Shakespeare cycle that produced film versions of all the plays) and of course the All Creatures Great and Small TV series and a few Harry Potter entries. He's also in a few period films in the mid to late 90s: Ang Lee's Sense and Sensibility, Kenneth Branagh's Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, 1997's Mrs Dalloway, the 1998 version of The Titchbourne Claimant and the 1999 Rupert Everett version of An Ideal Husband.

He also was in Nikita Mikhailkov's film The Barber of Siberia and had supporting roles in The Spy Who Came In From The Cold and 10 Rillington Place.

But I might best celebrate him for his role as the deranged "Baron Zorn" (!) tormenting his children in the underrated Hammer film Demons of the Mind (a rare starring role for him). And he turns up as a police inspector in that wonderful 'suicidal young bikers returning from the grave to terrorise local shopping centres' film Psychomania!
___
In terms of Hywel Bennett, he had his best run in the mid 60s to early 70s, doing lots of sexually tinged, youth oriented films: I'd highly recommend The Family Way directed by Roy Boulting and starring Bennett and Hayley Mills as a married couple with consummation issues. Its sort of the previous generation's attempts to catch up with the whole 'grim up north' kitchen sink trend of the 60s (Room At The Top, Taste of Honey) and do a less bleak southern comic take on frank relationship issues in recognisably mundane locations.

Then that's followed by the other Hywel Bennet and Hayley Mills collaboration under the direction of Roy Boulting: the horror Twisted Nerve (with Tarantino approved theme tune!)

The Virgin Soldiers was probably Bennett's biggest role, headlining a large cast of a celebrated novel about squaddies trying to get their end away in 1950s Singapore. That sort of began a run of sexy-comic roles: in the 1970 version of the Joe Orton play Loot, Anyone For Sex? (against Nanette Newman!), and most notoriously the recipient of the world's first penis transplant from Denholm Elliot's doctor in the sex comedy (what were they thinking?) Percy!

(Though of course Bennett had the sense to miss out on the cruder sequels Stand Up Virgin Soldiers and Percy's Progress!)

Later on it was more television: he turned up in the 1979 Play For Today about homosexuality, Coming Out, was in the Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy mini-series and in a couple of Dennis Potter pieces - a small role in Pennies From Heaven and a much larger one as the thuggish club owner Arthur 'Pig' Malion in Potter's final TV series Karaoke (part of Bennett's 'thug' period as a kind of a proto-Ray Winstone! He turns up in an episode of the Lock, Stock spin-off TV series too around this time). He's also in that same year's BBC adaptation of Neil Gaiman's Neverwhere. (Neverwhere was controversial because it was apparently going to get heavily digitally tinkered with in post-production (presumably in the vein of something like Lars von Trier's The Kingdom) but it was decided to just put the series out as it was, which led to a rather obviously stagey quality in the final result. Although at least the opening titles were memorably haunting! (It's only taken twenty or so years since this time for American Gods to get adapted. I have my fingers crossed that it leads to better results!)

The thing I'm most interested to get around to seeing from Bennett's back catalogue though is the sci-fi television drama Artemis '81, which sounds kind of Gaiman-esque in its own way, involving battles between demons and angels! Plus its got Sting and a very early role for Daniel Day-Lewis in it!


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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2017 2:06 am 
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Composer Daniel Licht


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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2017 6:34 am 
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colinr0380 wrote:
The thing I'm most interested to get around to seeing from Bennett's back catalogue though is the sci-fi television drama Artemis '81, which sounds kind of Gaiman-esque in its own way, involving battles between demons and angels! Plus its got Sting and a very early role for Daniel Day-Lewis in it!

I remmeber Bennett being particularly good in a TV adaptation of Malice aforethought - a handy manual for would be wife-murderers
Colin re Artemis out little exchange from 3 years back -
NABOB OF NOWHERE wrote:
colinr0380 wrote:
Quote:
I was glad to see that you voted for Monsieur Hire, Nabob of Nowhere! I went back and forth on whether to include it and it eventually just dropped off the bottom of my own list. Its a great film about the persecution of weirdo loners (hence why I can identify with it!), voyeurism and fantasy. It has been a while since I last saw it but isn't the majority of the film told in flashback as the main character falls/is pushed from the top of his block of flats?

I don't recall it being in flashback but being quite linear and without pulling it out again can't categorically say that that particular flashback reading is out of the question. Despite my best intentions to devote more time to strictly 80's stuff I went off on a Simenon bender which also resulted in Chabrol's Les Fantomes du Chapelier getting a foot in the door at number 50. If you revisit M.Hire it's well worth contrasting and comparing with Duvivier's even more acerbic version 'Panique', where Michel Simon plays the part far more aggressively than Blanc's rather self-hating nebbish.
One other orphan of mine, which in hindsight I should have spotlighted, is Artemis 81 directed by Alastair Reid but is David Rudkin's baby (He of Penda's Fen). It is a totally supersaturated bonkers affair with Rudkin's trademark obsessions of the folkloric supernatural, cinephilia (Hitchcock in this instance), psycho-analysis and low-rent sci-fi/parallel realities.
A lazy thumbnail sketch would be a Doctor Who episode where the script writers had hung out for a week round R.D Laing's place. For better or worse Sting is in it. Anyway I have a feeling it might be up your strasse and is available on DVD in a store near you.


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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2017 12:51 pm 
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So that's where I remembered the name from! Thanks for the recommendation, and I promise that I'll get around to watching it at some point!


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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2017 1:34 pm 

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colinr0380 wrote:
So that's where I remembered the name from! Thanks for the recommendation, and I promise that I'll get around to watching it at some point!
Sadly the DVD is missing some of the Hitchcock stuff, presumably due to rights problems. Still a fascinating film though, as most of David Rudkin's work is.


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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Mon Aug 07, 2017 7:57 am 
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Darren Daulton


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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Mon Aug 07, 2017 1:22 pm 
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Haruo Nakajima, the original Godzilla suit actor. He played the role for twelve consecutive films.


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 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Mon Aug 07, 2017 5:28 pm 
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Ty Hardin.


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