It is currently Fri Nov 24, 2017 3:16 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 461 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 ... 19  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 3:33 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 29, 2006 8:42 am
Location: England
brunosh wrote:
In WORD, go to the INSERT drop down menu and click on SYMBOL. Is this what you mean?

That's partly it but isn't there a way of using these special characters anywhere that you type, for example in this post if I want to write Jancso with the accent.


Top
 Profile  
 

 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 3:53 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 6:10 am
Location: London
On a Mac, Edit, Special Characters. With Windows, use ASCII, i.e. ALT and numbers e.g. 'é' is ALT 130.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 4:02 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 3:26 am
Location: East of Shanghai
Using Windows, select:
All Programs/ Accessories/ System Tools/ Character Map.

Hou Hsiao Hsien would be written in Pinyin as Hou Xiao Xian
(I think, but actually don't know what his family name is, probably Hu in Mandarin), and pronounced:
Ho
Sheow (kind of like meow, but quickly with the "e" sound fairly short. "shout" without the "t;' would be reasonably close)
She-en (like "she" + the pronunciation of the letter "n". For this one, there definaitely needs to be two distinct vowel sounds together).

Ho Sheow She-en
---------------------------------------------
In Japanese, often the "u" sound is swallowed, often to such a degree that I'm not sure why it is even there (he says, as though English doesn't jerk youa round with silent letters all the time).


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 4:05 pm 

Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 1:13 pm
Location: Kings County
'dziz∧s! 'dIdnt 'εniw∧n teIk lIngw'IstIks In 'kalIdz ?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 4:29 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 29, 2006 8:42 am
Location: England
Arn777 wrote:
With Windows, use ASCII, i.e. ALT and numbers e.g. 'é' is ALT 130.

Lemmy Caution wrote:
Using Windows, select:
All Programs/ Accessories/ System Tools/ Character Map.

Thanks very much. Far easier than doing google searches and using copy and paste.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 4:37 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Sat Apr 01, 2006 9:45 pm
how about Emmanuel Lubezki...
I have an Idea of how to pronounce it in Polish (as it is a Polish last name), but the fact that he's Mexican is throwing me off.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 5:14 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:20 pm
Location: Worthing
vogler wrote:
I find Eastern European names to be the most difficult. They are often completely different to how the name would be said in English.


But the spelling is usually completely phonetic, so once you've mastered the rules, you can usually get it right first time.

Quote:
Jan Němec - Yan Nye-metz


Sounds right to me.

Quote:
Jiří Menzel - Yir-jee Ment-sell (or is it more like Yee-jee Ment-zell or Men-sell?)


'Menzel' actually sounds as it would in English - there's no hidden 't'. Slight stress on the first syllable (which is true of most Czech words).

As for 'Jiří', 'Yir-jee' isn't bad, but the Czech 'ř' is more pronounced than that. Basically, the 'r' at the end of 'Yir' needs to be rolled, and then fused pretty much seamlessly with the 'j'. I normally write it as 'rzh', just to emphasise that the 'j' isn't a 'y'.

Quote:
Jan Svankmajer - Yan Shvank-my-er


Correct, but the name is actually spelt 'Å vankmajer'. (If it was 'Svankmajer', it would be pronounced 'Svank-my-er')

Quote:
Walerian Borowczyk - Valerian Bo-rov-chick (or Bo-roff-chick?)


Sounds good to me - I don't know about the distinction between 'rov' and 'roff', but since you'll doubtless have a strong non-Polish accent anyway it hardly matters.

Quote:
Jan Lenica - Yan Len-eat-za (or Len-it-za?)


The Quay Brothers seem to think it's 'Len-it-za', and I know they've discussed his work with Poles - I'm assuming their best mate Andrzej Klimowski knows how to get it right!

Right, I'm going to stop guessing Polish pronunciation and stick to what I do actually know:

Quote:
Vera Chytilova - Ve-ra Hee-ti-low-vuh (But the H is more like a cross between H and the ch sound in the Scottish Loch)


'Vera' is actually 'Vyera' - but, again, it's correctly spelt 'Věra'.

I'd say 'Hitilowvaah' - I can't see any indication that the 'y' or the 'i' are lengthened, but the final 'a' definitely is. But you're right about the 'Ch' sound.

Quote:
Jerzy Kawalerowicz - Jurt-see Ka...No chance, anybody know how to say this one?


At a guess, 'Yerzhy Kavalerovitch', but that's not exactly gospel.

And here are a few more Eastern Europeans, starting with another composer:

György Ligeti - 'Gyurge Ligitty' (stress on the 'Lig' - I heard this from the man himself during a lecture in the 1990s)

Jaromil Jireš - 'Yaromil Yiresh'

Emir Kusturica - 'Emir Kusturitsa'

Miloš Forman - 'Milosh Forman'

Jan HÃ…â„¢ebejk - 'Yan Hrzhebeik'

Oldřich Lipský - 'Oldrzhich Lipskee' (another Scottish 'ch')

Jan SvÄ›rák - 'Yah Svyeraahk' (long 'a')

Jiří Trnka - 'Yirzhi Trnka' (yes, pronounced exactly as spelt, as though there was no vowel until the end - stress on the 'Trnk')

FrantiÅ¡ek VláÄ


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 5:19 pm 
Go, and never darken my towels again!
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 10, 2004 4:24 am
Location: Sydney, Australia
vogler wrote:
I believe it is YAN-cho. But how do we say Miklos?

I always though it was MIK-loszh. But then I can't even speak English properly.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 5:30 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 29, 2006 8:42 am
Location: England
MichaelB wrote:
Correct, but the name is actually spelt 'Å vankmajer'. (If it was 'Svankmajer', it would be pronounced 'Svank-my-er')

Yes, quite right, but unfortunately I only discovered how to do accents/special characters etc. a few posts back in this thread - that was why I asked. All this time I have been copying and pasting from foreign sites or doing nothing at all. Some of the names I had printed correctly in documents on my computer for copying, others not e.g Å vankmajer.

Thanks for the input with these. I think I'm starting to get fairly good at East European names now. It drives me mad when I haven't a clue how to pronounce my favorite film-makers names.

Strange coincidence that this thread appeared shortly after we were discussing the pronunciation of Jan Němec.

Rufus T. Firefly wrote:
I always though it was MIK-loszh. But then I can't even speak English properly.

MIK-loszh YAN-cho - sounds pretty good.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 5:41 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:20 pm
Location: Worthing
vogler wrote:
unfortunately I only discovered how to do accents/special characters etc. a few posts back in this thread - that was why I asked. All this time I have been copying and pasting from foreign sites or doing nothing at all. Some of the names I had printed correctly in documents on my computer for copying, others not e.g Å vankmajer.


I only do it when I can be bothered, which is usually only:

1) when I'm writing professionally (and half the time the diacritics get dropped by the typesetters);
2) when it's important (as in threads like this - with Eastern European languages, spelling and pronunciation are intimately linked).

Unfortunately for the menu, booklet and packaging designers and even the subtitlers of the BFI's upcoming Å vankmajer box set, I most definitely WILL be bothered then!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 6:03 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 29, 2006 8:42 am
Location: England
MichaelB wrote:
I only do it when I can be bothered, which is usually only:

1) when I'm writing professionally (and half the time the diacritics get dropped by the typesetters);
2) when it's important (as in threads like this - with Eastern European languages, spelling and pronunciation are intimately linked).

I decided to edit my first post to add the correct diacritics. This should help to avoid confusion for people who read it in future.

I have just started a new wordpad document on my desktop where I am typing the names of all my favourite film-makers with the correct diacritical markings. This should make things very easy as all I have to do is copy the whole name and paste.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 6:46 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Mon May 01, 2006 7:17 pm
Location: London, UK
I'm also sure that MIK-losh YAN-cho is right.

I've always had problems with the Hungarian 'György', although of course I recognise it's the Hungarian equivalent of George, like the Czech Jiří and the Polish Jerzy. Is the pronunciation of 'György' something like 'Zhee-ur-zhee'? (I wonder how many people are tempted to pronounce the name of the great Marxist literary theorist György Lukacs as George Lucas.)

I think one of the reasons we're often unsure about pronunciations of foreign directors' names is that we seldom hear these names mentioned in the media, eg on TV, or in everyday conversations, and are generally dependent on print or the Internet for information about foreign-language films. As in so many other aspects, football fans have an easier time knowing how to pronounce players' names than film fans - and Milan Baroš's name is still often pronounced incorrectly.

BTW, after Borowczyk moved to France the French simply used to call him 'Boro', and in one interview I've seen with him, the French interviewer pronounces his name as 'Borowk-zeek'. I thought only the English were bad with names!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 7:04 pm 

Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2005 5:13 am
miless wrote:
how about Emmanuel Lubezki...
I have an Idea of how to pronounce it in Polish (as it is a Polish last name), but the fact that he's Mexican is throwing me off.


In Spanish you would say

eh-ma-nu"L" lou-bes-kee

But the last name is definitively Polish


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 7:19 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:20 pm
Location: Worthing
orlik wrote:
I've always had problems with the Hungarian 'György', although of course I recognise it's the Hungarian equivalent of George, like the Czech Jiří and the Polish Jerzy. Is the pronunciation of 'György' something like 'Zhee-ur-zhee'? (I wonder how many people are tempted to pronounce the name of the great Marxist literary theorist György Lukacs as George Lucas.)


My impression is that it's much closer to 'George' than you'd think (what with being foreign and exotic and all), only it's nearer 'Gyurge'. But it definitely isn't 'Zhee-ur-zhee', unless György Ligeti forgot how to pronounce his own first name! Mind you, he was in exile from his native Hungary for decades...

Quote:
BTW, after Borowczyk moved to France the French simply used to call him 'Boro', and in one interview I've seen with him, the French interviewer pronounces his name as 'Borowk-zeek'. I thought only the English were bad with names!


He actually introduces himself as 'Boro' during his live-action cameo in Le Théâtre de M. et Mme. Kabal.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 7:20 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 9:01 pm
Location: Melbourne, Australia
jon wrote:
Hou Hsiao Hsien

I can never remember how to spell it, let alone pronounce it. I am imagining that the last two H's are somewhat silent.

Anyone know how?


try this:
Hue How Hen

but replace the first "H" with "Xh", and the 2nd and 3rd "H" with "Xsh"

Xhu Xshow Xshen

Probably didn't help.

Better yet, get the Criterion "Yi Yi" dvd, and watch the interview with Tony Rayns - he pronounces it correctly...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 7:38 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Mon May 01, 2006 7:17 pm
Location: London, UK
MichaelB wrote:
orlik wrote:
I've always had problems with the Hungarian 'György', although of course I recognise it's the Hungarian equivalent of George, like the Czech Jiří and the Polish Jerzy. Is the pronunciation of 'György' something like 'Zhee-ur-zhee'? (I wonder how many people are tempted to pronounce the name of the great Marxist literary theorist György Lukacs as George Lucas.)


My impression is that it's much closer to 'George' than you'd think (what with being foreign and exotic and all), only it's nearer 'Gyurge'. But it definitely isn't 'Zhee-ur-zhee', unless György Ligeti forgot how to pronounce his own first name! Mind you, he was in exile from his native Hungary for decades...


Thanks, I was a bit confused by the 'Gyurge' - so that's with a soft 'g'? No wonder some 'György's have changed their names upon emigrating - György Lukacs became, at least for a while, the Germanised Georg Lukács, and the political essayist György Konrad plain old George Konrad.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 8:19 pm 

Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2006 1:36 am
Location: stratosphere, baby, stratosphere
in pronouncing japanese names there are 2 important rules to observe...

1) you DON'T stress parts of the name. speak it as flat as psosible.

2) the japanese syllabary is made up of mostly 2 letter groups, like "sa" or "ba" or "te", etc...
(i actually started to write out a a full description, and relazied it was insane to even get started....there's a lot of info on the net, though, on this important aspect)

for instance some usually misunderstandings are in double-vowel names...

for instance "miike" is not a long "i"

it is made up of mi, i, ke
so "me-ee-ke" (like keh)

a situation like
and each is pronounced equally and flat. there's no need to stress a part, that comes from the confusion of the differences between the letter grouping concept and most western "single letter" pronounciations.

this is just a basic rule, but an important one in distinguishing how to break habits from other languages.

the differences people hear come from 2 things usually
1) region kansai (osaka area) aomori (where terayama came from) etc. all have different accents, and even native japanese can have troubles with other regions, or other generations, as vocabulary and speaking style change.
2)the natural speed and ease that native speakers have.

it's 2 good ways to catch names and remember them...

putney


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 8:21 pm 

Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2006 1:36 am
Location: stratosphere, baby, stratosphere
sorry about bad english in that last post, i can;t find my glasses this morning...

putney


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 9:01 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 1:20 pm
Location: New England
When listening to Japanese extras, documentaries, etc -- I definitely hear stressed syllables in directors', actors', etc. names. I wonder if native speakers take these stresses so much for granted that they scarcely notice them (unless one grossly MIS-stresses a word). ;~}


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 11:17 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Wed Dec 15, 2004 5:34 am
Location: Portland, OR
Many thanks to the Fanciful Norwegian's valiant attempt at Weerasethakul.

We haven't gone over many Russian names yet. Does anybody know how to pronounce "Khrjanovsky" (as in Andrei or Ilya)? I've also seen it spelled "Khrzhanovsky" so I'm unclear as to whether the sound following the r is a like the j in "jam" or the s in "treasure."

Predictably, I'm going to break out the Georgian names. I should point out that the stresses I've indicated here are very, very light, often to the point that you don't even notice them. Syllabic emphasis in Georgian is very similar to syllabic emphasis in Japanese.

A primer on Georgian vowels. The letter transliterated as a is always pronounced like the a in "father." I is always an ee sound, as in "deed." O is always like the o in "mode." U is always like the oo in fool. E is a bit trickier...start with the e in "bed" and then slur it towards the ay in "May," but stop once you're halfway there. That's approximately the Georgian e, though from my own observation it seems to vary slightly based on context. Also, when multiple vowels appear in Georgian words and names, each one technically represents a separate syllable. Even so, they are usually pronounced so quickly they might as well be one syllable. E.g., you can safely pronounce ai like the word "eye," and ei like the ay in "May."

Quick consonant rules. By g here I always mean the g in "get." The Georgian r is lightly rolled (unless you're being poetic or sing-songy, in which case you would lay it on much thicker).

So, onto the names. I'll limit it to directors represented on DVD outside of Georgia (i.e., the ones most people here are actually likely to come across).

-----------------------

Otar Iosseliani - OH-tar EE-OH-sel-ee-AH-ni. This isn't what it would generally sound like when spoken normally, however. You can help yourself with this by pretending the "ee" sound comes at the end of his first name. So, say it quickly like this: OH-tar-ee OH-sel-yAH-ni. The "yah," is technically two syllables, but at the speed of normal Georgian speech this approximation will suffice.

Tengiz Abuladze - TEN-geez ah-boo-LAH-dze (or ah-boo-LAHD-zeh, if that helps you).

Eldar Shengelaya (or Shengelaia) - EL-dar shen-gel-EYE-ah. Again, this is technically shen-gel-AH-ee-ah, but vowel separation will not be that pronounced.

Giorgi Danelia - GYOR-gee (technically gee-OR-gee) dahn-AY-lee-ah (or dahn-AY-lyah).

Gela Babluani - GAY-lah bah-bloo-AH-nee.

Nana Djordjadze - NAH-nah jor-JAH-dze (probably the easiest name in this post).

Irakli Kvirikadze - ee-RAH-klee kveer-ee-KAH-dze.

Rezo Chkheidze - RAY-zoh CHKHE-ee-dze (or CHKHAY-dze). Good luck with this one. The ch is just like the ch in "much." The kh is similar to the Scottish loch, except it's pronounced near the front of your mouth instead of back by your throat. There's no syllable in between them. If that gives you trouble, try transferring the "ch" to his first name: RAY-zoch KHE-ee-dze.

Also, the title of Gela Babluani's 13 (Tzameti) seems to be throwing a lot of people off. The voiceover in the American trailer said "zuh-MET-ee," which is wrong. The U.K. trailer was slightly closer with "tzuh-MET-ee." It's actually closer to "TSAH-meh-tee" (still just an approximation, but a better one).


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 11:54 pm 
Not PETA approved
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 9:02 pm
Location: Canada
Michael Kerpan wrote:
When listening to Japanese extras, documentaries, etc -- I definitely hear stressed syllables in directors', actors', etc. names. I wonder if native speakers take these stresses so much for granted that they scarcely notice them (unless one grossly MIS-stresses a word). ;~}

Well, you know, despite what you may hear, there are different ways to emphasize a vowel beyond stress, which is mainly just added force. Another alternative is accent, which is not the same thing as stress (for one thing it doesn't necessarily involve an increase in the force of utterance). Accent involves altering or modifying one's intonation, alterations which can run a wide gamut. Japanese speakers do I think emphasize certain syllables, but I would say they do so through accent and not stress. This would account for the almost imperceptible nature of these emphases compared with the very obvious ones made by English and other stress-based languages. As well, and please correct me if I'm wrong, but the placement of such emphasis does not determine meaning in Japanese words.

The other major type of emphasis involves the relative length of vowels, but Japanese is so quickly and curtly pronounced that I assume this is not a method of emphasis in their language.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2007 12:20 am 
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 1:20 pm
Location: New England
In Japanese, stress is shown by tone. Stressed syllables are said a (slightly) higher pitch than unstressed ones. You are probably correct in calling this kind of stress "accent". Curiously, not until I became familiar with Japanese did I notice that American stressing/accenting syllables ALSO often used the same kind of tonal patterning.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2007 12:25 am 
Not PETA approved
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 9:02 pm
Location: Canada
Michael Kerpan wrote:
In Japanese, stress is shown by tone. Stressed syllables are said a (slightly) higher pitch than unstressed ones. You are probably correct in calling this kind of stress "accent". Curiously, not until I became familiar with Japanese did I notice that American stressing/accenting syllables ALSO often used the same kind of tonal patterning.

Ah, yes, silly me, I forgot about pitch altogether. Don't know why, I've known Japanese was a pitch language for a while now.

I'm pretty sure pitch would qualify as a form of accent, but it's best to be specific in these cases. So: listen to Kerpan.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2007 12:55 am 
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 1:20 pm
Location: New England
I use "stress" as a generic category for all forms of within-word emphasis -- not certain that this is proper linguistic terminology -- as I am far from the point when I formally studied such things....

It is interesting to note that Japanese strictly disallows sing-song accenting within words (including names) -- and yet English imposes such pattern on virtually all 4-syllable Japanese names. The Japanese like the sound of the "high-low high-low" pattern, however -- and manage to squeeze it in by (often) using doubled 2-syllable words like fuwa fuwa (fluffy) and toki doki (now and then). But this pattern doesn't get to come into play with names.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2007 4:11 am 
監督
User avatar

Joined: Thu Nov 04, 2004 4:34 am
Location: London, UK
First things first:

Quote:
And is Oshima pronounced as 'O-shima' or 'o-SHEE-ma'?

The o in Oshima is actually two os in Japanese, which is important (not dissimilar from putnams example, wherein there are two is in Miike--it's purely a matter of romanization conventions that one is doubled in transliteration and the other is not, though you will often find it with a macron or circumflex). Each letter in Japanese is pronounced for something like an equal amount of time, and it so happens that the o is as many letters in Japanese (they are often referred to as syllables, esp. when writing haiku. O is two syllables and shima is two syllables in this sense) as the shima and is thus pronounced for about the same amount of time. You should probably avoid trying to stress any of the syllables, but I'd have to say the way I've heard it the o is subtly louder and the ma is lower in pitch than either the o or the shi.

Another note on these stresses. Contrary to what Mr_sausage wrote, the stresses can actually change the meaning of the word, but that's relatively uncommon, and one usually relies on context to distinguish the words. The most famous example is with the word hashi, which can mean either bridge or chopsticks. Any Japanese speaker will tell you that they are pronounced with subtly different intonation. As if it weren't hard enough for a Japanese speaker to catch the difference (consider yourself lucky if you can hear the difference between the two-letter o as in Oshima and the one-letter o as in ocha, which means tea), there's an additional complicating factor which is that in Kansai they stress the syllables for the words of hashi in somewhat the opposite manner as they do in Kanto.

When talking about the stresses in names, it's worth noting that the stresses may change from person to person and certainly from context to context (such as exclaiming the name or using it in a question). If you manage to not stress it at all, there will be no misunderstanding, and once you have mastered that, if you manage to capture the subtle stressing (mostly pitch intonation as Kerpan pointed out), you will sound all the more masterful (I certainly haven't gotten that far with any measure of success).

Another thing to point out is that the stressing will also falsely appear to be in those places where you would expect the syllable to be deemphasized. For example, if you've always heard the ya in Kobayashi stressed, you may find an unstressed pronunciation of the name sounding much like the ba is stressed, because it seems strange that the syllable would be stressed as much as the other. That is to say, you might notice the strength of the ba relative to your expectations and interpret that as stress. I've often had this problem.

Also, while Mr_sausage is right in the in Japanese the syllables are pretty reliably of equal length, it's not quite right to say that one doesn't emphasize by changing the length of vowels. For example, because the double-letter o (i.e., oo), such often means large, it's not unusually to exaggerate its length as a means of indicating extreme largeness. More frequently in conversation, when speaking fast, one might slow down on a word to emphasize it's importance, particularly in stylized speech such as one might see on television.

Another comment: fuwa fuwa and toki doki are both repeated as part of a larger convention in the language for quite different reasons. Toki doki is part of the occasional convention of pluralization in Japanese (as a rule, Japanese doesn't pluralize, but there are a handful of repeated words like toki doki or hito bito or ho bo that indication pluralization, and indeed emphasize it), in this case meaning something like "from time to time" (really, it is a kind of plural if you think about it). There is actually a character that is used just for the purpose of indicated that the previous character is repeated as a means of pluralization. Fuwa fuwa, on the other hand, is part of a convention of repeating sounds in onomotopaeia (za za, which is the sound rain pouring down in streams or kira kira, which is the "sound" of light glistening off of the ocean). Similar to this, there is a tendency to repeat sounds in an onomotopaeic manner in adverbs, such as girigiri (at the last minute).


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 461 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 ... 19  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot]


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group




This site is not affiliated with The Criterion Collection