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 Post subject: Re: Lost Films
PostPosted: Mon Mar 31, 2014 6:53 am 
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Joined: Thu May 28, 2009 7:33 am
Location: Helsinki, Finland
A treasure trove of silent American movies found in Amsterdam


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 Post subject: Re: Lost Films
PostPosted: Mon Mar 31, 2014 12:43 pm 
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Here's a list of the first couple of dozen or so slated for preservation this year, though Variety also said that among these are “'The Reckless Age' (1924), a flapper feature starring Reginald Denny; and the crime melodrama 'For the Defense' (1922) starring ZaSu Pitts."

I guess this likely gives us at least a partial idea of what a Treasures VIII set could look like (or Treasures VII if the planned avant-garde set is still held up for the foreseeable future).


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 Post subject: Re: Lost Films
PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2014 3:54 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2005 1:59 pm
Location: Cheltenham, England
Love, Life and Laughter (1923), one of the BFI's Most Wanted, has been found in the Netherlands. (Link in Dutch.)

EDIT: Plenty more info, including the film's pressbook, now up on the BFI website.


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 Post subject: Re: Lost Films
PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2014 4:55 am 
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Joined: Fri May 19, 2006 10:09 am
Fantastic news, especially as the copy seems to be in surprisingly good shape, as the Dutch article indicates. I guess we can hope for a resto and release by the BFI?


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 Post subject: Re: Lost Films
PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2014 4:59 am 
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Location: Worthing
Tommaso wrote:
I guess we can hope for a resto and release by the BFI?

A very safe bet, I'd have thought.


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 Post subject: Re: Lost Films
PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2014 7:04 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 4:30 pm
Location: Chapel-en-le-Frith, Derbyshire, UK
Yes, Bryony Dixon, the BFI Silent Film Curator was on the BBC Radio 4's Today programme this morning talking about the find, that it is a nitrate film print with colour tinting and that the film will be restored with the Dutch Film Archive.


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 Post subject: Re: Lost Films
PostPosted: Fri Apr 04, 2014 1:05 pm 
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Joined: Wed Sep 02, 2009 7:28 pm
Very cool.


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 Post subject: Re: Lost Films
PostPosted: Wed Apr 16, 2014 1:55 pm 
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Joined: Thu May 28, 2009 7:33 am
Location: Helsinki, Finland
Norway Returns a Rare Silent Film to China

EDIT: hopefully the link now works.


Last edited by L.A. on Wed Apr 16, 2014 3:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Lost Films
PostPosted: Wed Apr 16, 2014 2:23 pm 
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Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 1:20 pm
Location: New England
L.A. wrote:

Useless link (for me, at least). Care to tell us alittle bit? ;-}


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 Post subject: Re: Lost Films
PostPosted: Wed Apr 16, 2014 2:38 pm 
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Quote:
Updated, 5:55 a.m.ET | In a gesture that could help ease relations between Norway and China, strained since the awarding of the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize to the imprisoned democracy advocate Liu Xiaobo, the National Library of Norway has returned a long-lost Chinese silent film.

A print of “The Cave of the Silken Web,” released in 1927 during a vibrant era in Chinese filmmaking, was discovered in the library’s archives in 2011. It is believed to be the only existing copy of the film, which was directed by Dan Duyu and is based on an episode from the Chinese classic novel “Journey to the West.”

Roger Josevold, the acting national librarian, presented the restored film to the China Film Archive in Beijing on Tuesday, according to the National Library of Norway’s website. The government-affiliated archive documents Chinese film history and preserves and restores classic films.

“The Cave of the Silken Web,” or Pan Si Dong (盘丝洞) in Chinese, received its Norwegian premiere in Oslo in January 1929, with Norwegian and Chinese subtitles, according to Agence France-Presse. It was the first Chinese film to be shown in Norway, Yang Lina, of the China Film Archive, said in an interview.

To mark the film’s return, she said, the archive was holding a public screening of the film Tuesday evening, with live piano accompaniment.

Surviving Chinese films from that era are a rarity today. The film industry in mainland China enjoyed vigorous growth in the early 20th century, with prominent studios in Shanghai churning out hugely popular romance, martial arts and dramatic films. After 1949, however, when the Communists emerged victorious from the civil war, filmmaking became a vehicle less for entertainment than for political rallying.

Since the 1990s, the industry has seen a resurgence along with China’s broader economic liberalization and opening up. The government also now recognizes filmmaking as an important tool of cultural influence.

The return of the film follows another restoration of historical relics from Norway to China. Under an agreement reached in December, a Norwegian museum announced it was returning seven columns taken from the old Summer Palace in Beijing, which were acquired by a Norwegian cavalry officer more than a century ago.

These moves may help pave the way for the resumption of regular diplomatic contacts between China and Norway. China suspended bilateral talks with Norway after the Norwegian Nobel Committee awarded the Peace Prize to Mr. Liu, who is serving an 11-year prison term for helping to write the political manifesto Charter 08.

Beijing demanded an apology from the Norwegian government, which insisted that even though the Nobel Committee is appointed by the Norwegian Parliament, it has no control over the awarding of the prize and therefore could not apologize. However, the Norwegian foreign minister, Borge Brende, who took office last October, has publicly called improving ties with China a key priority.


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 Post subject: Re: Lost Films
PostPosted: Sun Apr 27, 2014 11:20 pm 
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Long-lost 1935 Kon Ichikawa cartoon short discovered in U.S.


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 Post subject: Re: Lost Films
PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 2:19 pm 
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Joined: Thu May 28, 2009 7:33 am
Location: Helsinki, Finland
Robert Flaherty’s lost Irish Gaelic film found at Harvard


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 Post subject: Re: Lost Films
PostPosted: Mon Sep 22, 2014 10:04 pm 
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Joined: Sun Sep 20, 2009 5:23 am
Location: Florida
Lime Kiln Field Day (1913) -
NY Times wrote:
For decades, the seven reels from 1913 lay unexamined in the film archives of the Museum of Modern Art. Now, after years of research, a historic find has emerged: what MoMA curators say is the earliest surviving footage for a feature film with a black cast.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/21/nyreg ... ref=movies


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 Post subject: Re: Lost Films
PostPosted: Wed Oct 01, 2014 12:36 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2005 1:59 pm
Location: Cheltenham, England
Essanay production of Sherlock Holmes, starring William Gillette and directed by Arthur Berthelet, has been found by the French Cinematheque.


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 Post subject: Re: Lost Films
PostPosted: Thu Oct 23, 2014 6:37 pm 
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These are only "lost films" in the most literal sense (i.e., they're on 16mm), but since we don't have a "lost TV shows" thread and I don't think it's worth making one: The BFI has found two episodes of At Last the 1948 Show among David Frost's private collections.


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 Post subject: Re: Lost Films
PostPosted: Sat Nov 15, 2014 8:41 am 

Joined: Mon Nov 04, 2013 2:46 pm
Just been reading this on how The Alamo's original elements might be lost:

http://digitalbits.com/columns/my-two-cents/052814_1330


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 Post subject: Re: Lost Films
PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2014 11:05 pm 
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The current situation with The Alamo (as summarised from the posts made by Robert Harris over at HTF) is that MGM have contracted HTV to telecine and colour-correct the lone 70mm roadshow print for possible Blu-Ray release. The only problem with this is that the roadshow version is already beyond a proper restoration, the existing elements can be used to create a decent looking Blu-Ray but nothing beyond that.

The original elements for the shorter release version are what desperately need a restoration if they are to be viable for any type of large format screening (4K, 70mm) in the future. MGM currently believes that the elements are pristine and require no preservation efforts whatsoever.

There's plenty of extra details available from Mr Harris at the 55-page thread over on HTF but it currently resembles a gargantuan pit of despair and may be hazardous to your health.


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 Post subject: Re: Lost Films
PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2014 2:41 pm 

Joined: Fri Dec 05, 2014 2:51 am
antnield wrote:
Essanay production of Sherlock Holmes, starring William Gillette and directed by Arthur Berthelet, has been found by the French Cinematheque.

Great news!

I'm hoping that some of those early lost Charlie Chan films will be found eventually.

Does anyone have any current information on those lost films? In particular, I would love to see Charlie Chan Carries On (1931), starring Warner Oland.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2014 3:12 am 

Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 8:05 am
The news has finally broken about the discovery and restoration several months ago of a missing Oswald the Lucky Rabbit found in Norway, “Empty Socks”, which apparently is the first Christmas themed Disney production.

A friend of mine was involved with the discovery and he has confirmed that this is not the original 1927 silent version, but a 1930s reissue with synchronized soundtrack.

The film will be screened in Oslo on December 17th with another Oswald short Tall Timber. I am very much looking forward to attending this event.

The link below is for the article in Norwegian.

http://www.aftenposten.no/kultur/Disney ... Y.facebook


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 Post subject: Re: Lost Films
PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2014 4:33 pm 
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Location: Puerto Rico
That's pretty cool. Any other differences besides the synchronized soundtrack?


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 Post subject: Re: Lost Films
PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2014 10:59 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 10:58 pm
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Yahoo article on Disney's "Empty Socks" (English)
https://www.yahoo.com/movies/lost-and-f ... 64977.html


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2014 9:08 pm 

Joined: Mon Dec 29, 2014 9:00 pm
Hi all, hoping someone can help me with a question for a screenplay I'm writing that has King Kong Appears in Edo as a plot device.

What I'm looking for is a steer on what it's approx value would be if it were to come up for auction (as a complete film), and how many reels it would likely to have been.

Many thanks in advance

Anthony


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 Post subject: Re: Lost Films
PostPosted: Mon Feb 23, 2015 10:42 am 

Joined: Sat Feb 21, 2015 3:43 pm
Hello

I am huge fan of japanesese cinematography, especially the 60-70 decades, and my mind considers the fact than one of films of Master Masaki Kobayashi named "Nippon-no seishun" AKA "Hymn to a tired man" has never been releasted on dvd or any other medium. The picture was filmed in the top condition od Masaki Kobayayashi in year 1968 and a large number of cinemaniacs are craving to see this movie in any quality. Are there any chances for DVD release of this film in the immediate future?
I would be most grateful if you would look into this matter.

I will be thankful for any response.


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 Post subject: Re: Lost Films
PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2015 4:25 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 2:24 pm
Location: Teegeeack
Korean Film Archive announces recovery of 94 lost films, including early works by Lee Man-hee and Im Kwon-taek.


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 Post subject: Re: Lost Films
PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2015 11:09 pm 
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Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2004 7:24 pm
The Fanciful Norwegian wrote:
Korean Film Archive announces recovery of 94 lost films, including early works by Lee Man-hee and Im Kwon-taek.

Amazing news. Lee Man-Hee is probably the most important discovery I've made from the Korean Film Archive's series of releases, so I'm delighted that one of his films has been recovered.


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