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PostPosted: Thu Aug 31, 2017 9:26 pm 
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Manifesto (Julian Rosefeldt)
A feast for those who thought Blanchett the best thing about I'm Not There: All Cate Blanchett All The Time reading aloud in various personas -- and here's the really exciting bit -- excerpts from art manifestos. Hilariously satirical and sincerely poetic by turns, but always strange. Very strange. Highly recommended.


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 Post subject: Re: The Films of 2017
PostPosted: Thu Aug 31, 2017 9:28 pm 
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Wish I could have seen it as an art installation. Apparently there's a synchronized moment during all of the competing monologues where they match up at the exact same time that's supposed to be quite impactful


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 Post subject: Re: The Films of 2017
PostPosted: Thu Aug 31, 2017 9:39 pm 
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The film ends with a sort of fugue of all the scenes using split-screen, and it does sort of synchronize into a unified chord.

I'm glad I caught this in the theatre. Home viewing, on the other hand, will have the advantage of being able to browse back and forth among the manifestos.


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 Post subject: Re: The Films of 2017
PostPosted: Thu Aug 31, 2017 11:42 pm 
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I found this film somewhat disappointing. Great concept, and Blanchett is game as anything taking it on, but I felt like the material defeated the film, as, despite the desperate variety of all the different characters and settings, the language of the various manifestos was incredibly samey, and ended up creating a conceptual mush. When the Dogme Manifesto came along towards the end (in perhaps the film's funniest sequence) it was surprisingly refreshing because it was so practical and specific, and thus stood in contrast to the vague pomposity of so much of the rest of the film's language.

I expect that's another aspect of the film that would have been better served experiencing it as a simultaneous installation than a linear slog.

The film is, however, a brilliant architectural showcase. The location scout did an amazing job!


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 14, 2017 10:51 am 
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Agreed that the locations were amazing, definitely one of the film's strengths.

I too found the film a slog at times, but was all the same blown away by its weird cumulative effect.

There's something inherently silly about writing art manifestos at all. The monotonous and virtually interchangeable declarations of originality were, I suppose, an intentional irony. For better or worse, bland texts may have suited Rosefeldt's purposes (which seem not to be illustration or exposition) -- like a chef playing around with creative ways to dress up tofu. Having said that, a few of the manifestos were beautiful and interesting in their own right.

Favourite scene: the puppet dolls!


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