Magic Mike/Magic Mike XXL (Soderbergh/Jacobs, 2012/2015)

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Oedipax
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 8:48 am
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Re: Magic Mike (Steven Soderbergh, 2012)

#26 Post by Oedipax » Sun Jul 01, 2012 10:11 pm

wattsup32 wrote:
domino harvey wrote:This just barely ended up being Soderbergh's biggest opening weekend ever, coming in a bit over Ocean's Twelve at $39.1 million!
On a $7 million production budget!
Which just goes to the point made in that Soderbergh interview above - why aren't the studios making a bunch of sub-$10 million dollar movies that can potentially pay off like this one? Why are hundred-million dollar tentpoles so preferable?

Also, does anyone know what the P&A cost was on Magic Mike? Because if it cost as much to open as they claim most films do today, it might still be in the red even with a great opening weekend (not to say it won't be profitable eventually).

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knives
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Re: Magic Mike (Steven Soderbergh, 2012)

#27 Post by knives » Sun Jul 01, 2012 10:16 pm

Generally (though not always) advertising costs about the same as the movie, but given this was given a bigger than usual push for such a small film you could probably estimate that it cost the company double production or 21 mil in total and still hold on reasonably. At the very least it could not have cost more than 40 mil.

wattsup32
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Re: Magic Mike (Steven Soderbergh, 2012)

#28 Post by wattsup32 » Sun Jul 01, 2012 10:37 pm

Oedipax wrote:
wattsup32 wrote:
domino harvey wrote:This just barely ended up being Soderbergh's biggest opening weekend ever, coming in a bit over Ocean's Twelve at $39.1 million!
On a $7 million production budget!
Which just goes to the point made in that Soderbergh interview above - why aren't the studios making a bunch of sub-$10 million dollar movies that can potentially pay off like this one? Why are hundred-million dollar tentpoles so preferable?

Also, does anyone know what the P&A cost was on Magic Mike? Because if it cost as much to open as they claim most films do today, it might still be in the red even with a great opening weekend (not to say it won't be profitable eventually).
I recall that from the interview and it made my heart swell a little bit. I've said for a while now that, if I hit the lottery I'd start a film production company that made ten $1 million dollar films to release a year. I think this is model has a very high potential for profit. You'd have to hire young, hungry directors, writers, and actors. But, I think it could work.

Of course, I know nothing about film unions and pay scales, so maybe I'm totally off. But, hearing Soderbergh argue in the spirit of my pipe dream still felt good.


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warren oates
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Re: Magic Mike (Steven Soderbergh, 2012)

#30 Post by warren oates » Tue Jul 03, 2012 8:38 pm

Saw this over the weekend and thoroughly enjoyed it. A Soderbergh B-side that's better than most of his A-sides? A major minor? Termite art that succeeds with the unlikeliest subject matter. A film with far better writing and acting than it seems to deserve. Soderbergh's most completely realized work since The Informant. Tatum and McConaughey are great, but so is the rest of the cast. There's not really a false note in any scene I can think of. And while there are plenty of fun movie-movie gestures, the storytelling is grounded to the point where you find yourself really believing in the world and caring about the characters.

And there were a couple of aesthetic/technical choices that were so precise, so correct, so masterful and so lowkey given all that I have to highlight them here: 1) the sound mixing in the club scenes, where the dialogue is just at the edge of audible, so we can barely make out the gist of what's being said but are missing words and chunks of dialogue here and there, just like we would if we were there in real life -- haven't really seen this so well done in any film before; 2) the camera angles in the shot-reverse set-up in Brooke's car as she drives Adam home from the worst hangover ever -- it's a rare treat to see canted angles used so organically to put us in the place of the characters and advance the narrative.


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AlexHansen
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Re: Magic Mike (Steven Soderbergh, 2012)

#32 Post by AlexHansen » Sun Jul 08, 2012 9:43 pm

Don't have a lot to add to what's already been said, but the casting of comedians in unexpected roles continues. Despite thinking the DJ was played by Cesar from the Gilmore Girls, it was just the guy that's fluffy.

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Professor Wagstaff
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Re: Magic Mike (Steven Soderbergh, 2012)

#33 Post by Professor Wagstaff » Sun Jul 08, 2012 9:50 pm

Most of what I've seen written about the film seems to focus on Channing Tatum's former career as a stripper and how this is reflected in Mike's life and that of The Kid, but has anyone written in a review or article about how Mike might stand in for Soderbergh? I went back to see Magic Mike again last night and it struck me in the third act that this character's story follows the director's. Both are men of many talents who have dedicated their lives to their many jobs. As a result Mike has earned a popular reputation with his fans and financial success, but he is continually denied the chances to be independent and pursue his artistic goals (in this case custom furniture) by those who do not think he can achieve these goals (Dallas giving him enough responsibility to feel independent, but still keeping him on the hook) or do not want to help him (the bank, which I though stood in for the major studios). Soderbergh suggests these same dilemmas in the previously posted interview with Dave Poland, how even an Oscar-winning director with multiple hit films that attract major stars and are often made for such small amounts of money cannot get $7million to make low budget film with a big box office draw like Channing Tatum.
SpoilerShow
Mike's decision to retire, his absence barely noticed, seemed like how Soderbergh might see his career. Both men are commodities until they reach an age where no one wants them anymore.

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matrixschmatrix
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Re: Magic Mike (Steven Soderbergh, 2012)

#34 Post by matrixschmatrix » Sun Jul 08, 2012 9:53 pm

It seems as though it's hard to argue that directing is a youth obsessed career, though- I've never seen Soderbergh say anything about feeling like people thought him too old for it, and God knows there are plenty of 60+ directors out there.

Jack Phillips
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Re: Magic Mike (Steven Soderbergh, 2012)

#35 Post by Jack Phillips » Sun Jul 08, 2012 10:42 pm

Professor Wagstaff wrote:Most of what I've seen written about the film seems to focus on Channing Tatum's former career as a stripper and how this is reflected in Mike's life and that of The Kid, but has anyone written in a review or article about how Mike might stand in for Soderbergh? I went back to see Magic Mike again last night and it struck me in the third act that this character's story follows the director's. Both are men of many talents who have dedicated their lives to their many jobs. As a result Mike has earned a popular reputation with his fans and financial success, but he is continually denied the chances to be independent and pursue his artistic goals (in this case custom furniture) by those who do not think he can achieve these goals (Dallas giving him enough responsibility to feel independent, but still keeping him on the hook) or do not want to help him (the bank, which I though stood in for the major studios). Soderbergh suggests these same dilemmas in the previously posted interview with Dave Poland, how even an Oscar-winning director with multiple hit films that attract major stars and are often made for such small amounts of money cannot get $7million to make low budget film with a big box office draw like Channing Tatum.
SpoilerShow
Mike's decision to retire, his absence barely noticed, seemed like how Soderbergh might see his career. Both men are commodities until they reach an age where no one wants them anymore.
Except Soderbergh isn't really retiring--he's going to Miami (i.e. TV).

JMULL222
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Re: Magic Mike (Steven Soderbergh, 2012)

#36 Post by JMULL222 » Mon Jul 09, 2012 3:20 am

I dealt with it obliquely in my piece, but Matt Prigge (an excellent critic at PhillyWeekly) covered it as the main angle in his review, and it's well worth a read.

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mfunk9786
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Re: Magic Mike (Steven Soderbergh, 2012)

#37 Post by mfunk9786 » Tue Jul 10, 2012 12:55 pm

I think I've started every Soderbergh snippet I've written for this site in the last few years with a mention of what a roll he's on – but as he's entering the twilight of his career as a film director, it's just time to say that the whole damn thing has been one long roll. Magic Mike is an excellent film to go out on, even though he's decided he's not going to – from the vintage Warners titles leading into it, there's a heavy 70s influence all over this, but it becomes great not because of nostalgia, but because of the original choices Soderbergh makes that other filmmakers would be either too fearful or too inept to pull off. I guess most people will come away from this film wowed by the cartoonish (in a good way!) performance by Matthew McConaughey – his purpose in life is to be in this role, in this film. He's in almost preternaturally good shape, like a walking twisting oak tree comprised of 99% muscle, and whatever his flaws might typically be as an actor, Soderbergh decides to hone in on them and turn them into tremendous strengths. This is a performance comprised of pure energy and exuberance, but not without an underlying sociopathic uncaring, a menace that McConaughey never forgets to leave out, even in his goofiest moments. All of the casting here is just perfect – it should go without saying by now how much of a pure screen talent Channing Tatum is, but the supporting roles (in particular, a wholly real person played with such light brush strokes by Cody Horn) all just do exactly what they need to do to make this film come together the right way. It's redundant to discuss any more of the strengths of Magic Mike because they're the strengths of all of Soderbergh's films, even those that don't quite work – he's got an eye for realistic settings and an ear for genuine conversation that no other filmmaker can match. The final conversation of the film is an amalgam of the two hours that preceded it – despite the fact that it's adorable, mawkish, and wickedly funny; it's something we just don't see too much of at the movies anymore. Correction: not just anymore, ever. Magic Mike is a minor masterpiece and the third mainstream release in a row that reminds the public (even if they weren't in the mood to listen with the underrated Haywire) that Soderbergh is a national treasure. In the words of the film critic Michael Phillips, “It's not a major movie, but it's majorly entertaining.” We need more movies like this.

Mr. Ned
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Re: Magic Mike (Steven Soderbergh, 2012)

#38 Post by Mr. Ned » Tue Jul 10, 2012 2:03 pm

My sentiments exactly. This might be the movie of the summer for me, Moonrise Kingdom notwithstanding. Soderbergh has been on a hot streak since The Girlfriend Experience, and Magic Mike might actually top the former for being both technically and narratively flawless. I appreciate your bringing up McConaughey, whose character becomes increasingly darker as the film reaches its zenith; his arc or lack thereof, not Mike's or the Kid's, makes this movie. Not to mention how great a theater experience it was to be the sole male in a sea of repressed middle-aged women, all drunk and spunky for some masculine titillation. Whatever Soderbergh has supplemented in his diet the last few years, I want some.

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flyonthewall2983
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Re: Magic Mike (Steven Soderbergh, 2012)

#39 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Sat Jul 14, 2012 7:03 am

A little funny story, my mother drug her husband to see this last night at the multiplex and lo and behold who does she run into? My teenage niece, her granddaughter lol.

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domino harvey
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Re: Magic Mike (Steven Soderbergh, 2012)

#40 Post by domino harvey » Sun Nov 11, 2012 2:34 pm

Yep, this was yet another fantastic Soderbergh end run up to retirement. After the antiseptic sterility of Contagion, Soderbergh goes in the opposite direction with a warmth of uncharacteristic humanism and (comparatively) fleshed out characterization. It's no surprise that the film opens with the 70s logo, as this is a throwback to the wandering, cryptic character-based scant narratives of the post studio era decade, and Soderbergh has a blast indulging sides of his talent he hasn't of late drawn on. As for the performances, Tatum continues to show great promise, and I enjoyed new to me Cody Horn's presence. For all the Oscar buzz around McConaughey, though, I found him far more entertaining in Bernie, but the man's paid his dues either way

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mfunk9786
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Re: Magic Mike (Steven Soderbergh, 2012)

#41 Post by mfunk9786 » Sun Nov 11, 2012 3:24 pm

Wait'll you see him in Killer Joe

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colinr0380
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Re: Magic Mike (Steven Soderbergh, 2012)

#42 Post by colinr0380 » Wed Dec 19, 2012 5:36 am

Somehow I don't think I'm in the target audience for the film - I just received the UK Blu-ray (with body glittered title on the cover) and now have a voucher for a "Girl's Night Out" that I need to redeem before February next year. Who's with me?(!)

(Unfortunately Killer Joe didn't come with a tie-in 'money off your next KFC meal' voucher)

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The Fanciful Norwegian
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Re: Magic Mike (Steven Soderbergh, 2012)

#43 Post by The Fanciful Norwegian » Wed Dec 19, 2012 8:31 am

I made the mistake of telling my mostly-female family (who haven't seen the movie) that I watched this and that it's actually a serious movie with a lot on its mind. Which was about as persuasive to them as the "I read Playboy for the articles" line.

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life_boy
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Re: Magic Mike (Steven Soderbergh, 2012)

#44 Post by life_boy » Fri Dec 28, 2012 6:00 am

Soderbergh proves once again to be one of the more interesting directors working in mainstream American cinema. This definitely had the feel of a throwback, New Hollywood character piece with strong performances and nuanced interactions. The film didn't feel nostalgic toward 70's American movies, but more built upon their foundation. I really enjoyed Tatum's lived-in Mike, who could have easily been a stereotyped hooker-with-a-heart-of-gold type except with an interest in furniture design, but instead he is a guy who is both industrious and a bit frivolous, a guy who works hard so he can play hard. McConaughey was fantastic, finding the right balance of charisma and sleaze to really embody a character who has become a little too old to coast through his life based only on his looks. Is this Magic Mike in 10 years time? I liked that the film had a frankness about sex without being explicit and that, even though there was a broad acceptance of Mike's occupation, it still presented its social prejudices and genuine conflicts.

In addition to the New Hollywood update, I also saw a bit of the Depression-era rags-to-riches story of a vaudevillian performer with some of the naturalistic nuances more common to our era. This doesn't just offer a recession fantasy but is also honest enough to see the limitations of the fantasies some of the characters are trying to live out. There is an insustainability to it all, that gives the film a narrative spark and a hint of deep, underlying sadness.

Someone mentioned the fascinating canted angle in the car scene, which I also loved. There were several moments where Soderbergh proved he could do more than just give/allow actors naturalistic action, he can also shoot stylized images that carry visual weight. That was one, the scene where Mike comes into his apartment and sits on a chair in the foreground where we can only see the back of his head is another. It seems to me Soderbergh has foregone naturalism in the aesthetic while maintaining and embracing it in the performances and story.

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colinr0380
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Re: Magic Mike (Steven Soderbergh, 2012)

#45 Post by colinr0380 » Fri Dec 28, 2012 9:16 am

life_boy wrote:McConaughey was fantastic, finding the right balance of charisma and sleaze to really embody a character who has become a little too old to coast through his life based only on his looks. Is this Magic Mike in 10 years time? I liked that the film had a frankness about sex without being explicit and that, even though there was a broad acceptance of Mike's occupation, it still presented its social prejudices and genuine conflicts.
I'm afraid I still haven't gotten to the film yet, but your comment here makes me think a lot of Dazed and Confused. Perhaps it is just the presence of McConaughey in both, but I wonder if you could parallel the 'just slightly too old' character unable to move on (or unwilling due to the adulation and status he gets from his position) from that film with the character here?

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dad1153
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Re: Magic Mike (Steven Soderbergh, 2012)

#46 Post by dad1153 » Mon Dec 31, 2012 8:30 pm

McConaughey's character in "Magic Mike" totally feels like Dave Wooderson grew up, became a male stripper and is now, in the twilight of his "sexy" phase, living his last hurrahs to the fullest (with all the maturity of a not-stupid man trying to still be a player in the business without having to take his clothes off, though he has no problem with it and is happy to do so). I totally thought of "Dazed and Confused" as a prequel of sorts to "Magic Mike" in regards to the McConaughey character the first time I saw the latter in theaters.





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