Claude Chabrol

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knives
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Re: Claude Chabrol

#101 Post by knives » Sun Jun 14, 2015 2:55 am

Got to a lesser known one, Marie-Chantel Vs. Doctor Kha, today. On the global level this is easily one of the best post-Bond '60s chic films I've yet to encounter. The only thing that comes close is the Matt Helm films. Now, on the level of Chabrol's career this ranks mightily low not standing to the standard he set for himself after Les Biches. Nevertheless it works far better then his other female staring film in the genre I've seen, Road to Corinth, with the sense of fun and intelligence of the lead succeeding. The film really doesn't work independently. You either have to watch it as a Chabrol film, a Bond comedy, or both. It dies in its two legs. For me its most interesting to watch as a Chabrol since it is identifiable as him while also being a clear case of a lost in the wilderness film which I've come to associate his '60s period with. There's little visually to indicate Chabrol, but what is is an interesting showing of his evolution as an artist. The main thing is his use of colour, particularly blue, white, red, and black, which remains associations no one else would think of. The other bit is the use of violence which is fairly extreme and rough here. There's probably no other film in the genre with as many exposed arteries as this and the fights scenes have a natural brutality to it that Chabrol perversely seems to be pushing just for the reason others wouldn't; namely the lead's gender. I wouldn't call the film feminist per say, but Chabrol doesn't allow concerns of gender affect his violence ala Batgirl.

The other fun thing to consider is the degree and fashion in which he's aping Hitchcock here. Obviously next to De Palma he has the biggest reputation for such behavior, but generally I've found it to be lacking in his text with consideration of genre being the only serious factor. Not so here. He steals liberally for plot and visuals even going so far as an overextended cameo which comes across almost like a last minute replacement. Nearly every film Hitchcock had made up to that point and seemingly at least one he hadn't done yet given the Topaz like humour at the cold war. Each sequence could function as its own tribute starting with The Lady Vanishes going to The Man Who Knew Too Much so on and so forth. It's a little bit of fun which makes the experience worth more then the dated jokes its printed on.

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copen
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Re: Claude Chabrol

#102 Post by copen » Sun Jun 14, 2015 11:51 am

i really liked his last film Bellamy (2009). after the disapointing "A Girl Cut in Two", it was a fantastic return to form. i wanted to spend hours with the inspector and his wife. as far as i was concerned, the movie should have gone on for hours.
my favorites will always be the swindle and la ceremonie, with his other isabelle huppert collaborations not too far behind.
L'enfer (1994) was also good.

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Re: Claude Chabrol

#103 Post by Stefan Andersson » Tue Jul 21, 2015 5:15 am

Le Beau Serge, restored, to screen at this year´s Venice festival:
http://www.screendaily.com/festivals/ve ... ntID=42422" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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domino harvey
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Re: Claude Chabrol

#104 Post by domino harvey » Wed Apr 12, 2017 10:49 am

Image

"Containing homosexuals of both sexes" is my new favorite pull quote


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domino harvey
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Re: Claude Chabrol

#106 Post by domino harvey » Wed Apr 12, 2017 12:32 pm

That was an unexpectedly interesting article, thanks!

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domino harvey
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Re: Claude Chabrol

#107 Post by domino harvey » Tue May 23, 2017 2:45 am

I don't know if this is widely known, but despite not being mentioned on the packaging, David Kalat actually splits duties with RIc Menello on the commentary for All Day Entertainment's edition of the Cry of the Owl. Both do a great job, and man, what a masterpiece, one of Chabrol's best. Another one to add to your list for the David Kalat completists out there. The insert is a recreation of one character's suicide note too, helpfully translated into English...

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domino harvey
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Re: Claude Chabrol

#108 Post by domino harvey » Sat Apr 21, 2018 12:11 pm

HD rips of Le boucher and La femme infidele on French TV have surfaced on back channels... have these films finally received restoration work? Would love to see Arrow revisit their Chabrol holdings with a massive set

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starmanof51
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Re: Claude Chabrol

#109 Post by starmanof51 » Sun Apr 22, 2018 2:15 am

domino harvey wrote:HD rips of Le boucher and La femme infidele on French TV have surfaced on back channels... have these films finally received restoration work? Would love to see Arrow revisit their Chabrol holdings with a massive set
Oh man, doing for him something like what they’ve been doing for Borowczyk would be terrific

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NABOB OF NOWHERE
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Re: Claude Chabrol

#110 Post by NABOB OF NOWHERE » Sun Apr 22, 2018 3:36 am

Les Biches Claude Chabrol Panoceanic Films 60 000 €
Le Boucher Claude Chabrol Panoceanic Films 60 000 €
La femme infidèle Claude Chabrol Panoceanic Films 60 000 €
Les innocents aux mains sales Claude Chabrol Panoceanic Films 60 000 €
La route de Corinthe Claude Chabrol Panoceanic Films 35 000 €
Folies bourgeoises Claude Chabrol Panoceanic Films 35 000 €
CNC resto awards late 2013

Also there was an article /rumour very recently-which I can't put my finger on- that the Artedis titles had received aid for restoration work, which include Que la bête meure, La rupture and Juste avant la Nuit

L'Oeuil Malin has been definitely restored but will appear on Studio Canal

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domino harvey
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Re: Claude Chabrol

#111 Post by domino harvey » Thu Dec 06, 2018 1:46 am

Has anyone read Jacob Leigh's the Late Films of Claude Chabrol: Genre, Visual Expressionism and Narrational Ambiguity? It's getting a more affordable paperback release in April, but I'm excited at the prospect of someone tackling Chabrol's terrific run of late period films

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Matt
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Re: Claude Chabrol

#112 Post by Matt » Thu Dec 06, 2018 5:36 pm

I'm immediately put off by that title, but encouraged by the book's length (only 208 pages!)—it wouldn't feel like a waste of time even if it doesn't have much new to say. Haven't read it, but the run of films it covers (from La Cérémonie through Bellamy) alone is one that any filmmaker should be extremely proud to have produced.

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domino harvey
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Re: Claude Chabrol

#113 Post by domino harvey » Sat Jan 05, 2019 2:51 pm

Caught up with Le Tigre aime a la chair fraiche and Le Tigre se parfume la dynamite and found both far better than my previous experience with Chabrol's commercial 60s filmmaking, La route de Corinthe. Both films are intentionally ludicrous, but only the first could pass as a sincere spy film. However, it's not surprising the franchise died with the second, as the majority of the amusement in the later film comes from Chabrol's repeated undermining of the material. This is a film that punishes anyone trying to follow along, and once I realized what Chabrol was doing (recreating all the absurd overblown illustrations of men's adventure magazines-- women in leopard print swimsuits chained to walls,&c-- with as little connective tissue as possible) I could appreciate it on the level it was pitched at. The first film was already absurd, but the sequel achieves new levels of incredulity-- I don't know when I will ever see anything as fucking ridiculous as a femme fetale pushing a remote after bedding our hero and having the entire ceiling open up with armed men slowly lowered to the ground! But while it's diverting to see Chabrol make a Hitchcock cameo as a shark doctor (!) and be treated to exchanges that undermine all forms of revolution from both sides of the political spectrum (Good fodder for some future "Chabrol doesn't pick sides" paper once these get wider distribution), the first film is so, so, so much better and more effective. Both show how ridiculously talented Chabrol was and how he kept himself interested in the material by finding novel ways to shoot it, but only the first film works as more than an exercise. I don't know what the costs would be of restoring them, but a double bill of these would be a natural fit for an Arrow set.

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knives
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Re: Claude Chabrol

#114 Post by knives » Sat Jan 05, 2019 7:18 pm

So far I haven't found any of Chabrol's films as dire as La route de Corinthe. Of these bizarre little spy films he was doing my favorite remains Marie Chantal against Dr. Kha which is mercilessly cruel to its antagonists in a way that reminds me of some of his twisty alliance films from the '70s. It's also a bit of stylish fun that also works to undermine the spy trappings though in this case by showing how mean the genre can be. Surprisingly the film itself doesn't come across as mean or cruel. Just the characters.

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domino harvey
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Re: Claude Chabrol

#115 Post by domino harvey » Tue Mar 19, 2019 11:25 pm

In addition to Le scandale / the Champagne Murders, Kino Lorber just confirmed they’ll be releasing L'Œil du malin on Blu-ray!

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Re: Claude Chabrol

#116 Post by domino harvey » Tue May 28, 2019 2:11 am

Chabrol will be getting one of those Conversations of With Filmmakers interview books in February of 2020
Image

Claude Chabrol (1930–2010) was a founding member of the French New Wave, the group of filmmakers that revolutionized French filmmaking in the late 1950s and early 1960s. One of the most prolific directors of his generation, Chabrol averaged more than one film per year from 1958 until his death in 2010. Among his most influential films, Le Beau Serge, Les Cousins, and Les Bonnes Femmes established his central place within the New Wave canon. In contrast to other filmmakers of the New Wave such as Jean-Luc Godard and Éric Rohmer, Chabrol exhibited simultaneously a desire to create films as works of art and an impulse to produce work that would be commercially successful and accessible to a popular audience.

The seventeen interviews in this volume, most of which have been translated into English for the first time, offer new insights into Chabrol’s remarkably wide-ranging filmography, providing a sense of his attitudes and ideas about a number of subjects. Chabrol shares anecdotes about his work with such actors as Isabelle Huppert, Gerard Depardieu, and Jean Yanne, and offers fresh perspectives on other directors including Jean-Luc Godard, Fritz Lang, and Alfred Hitchcock.

His mistrust of conventional wisdom often leads him to make pronouncements intended as much to shock as to elucidate, and he frequently questions established ideas and normative attitudes toward moral, ethical, and social behaviors. Chabrol’s intelligence is far-reaching, moving freely between philosophy, politics, psychology, literature, and history, and his iconoclastic spirit, combined with his blend of sarcasm and self-deprecating humor, give his interviews a tone that hovers between a high moral seriousness and a cynical sense of hilarity in the face of the world’s complexities.

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BenoitRouilly
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Re: Claude Chabrol

#117 Post by BenoitRouilly » Tue May 28, 2019 6:52 am

Bong Joon-ho thanked Chabrol (and Clouzot) during his speech for the 2019 Palme d'Or win, in Cannes last weekend.
There is a bit of La Cérémonie in his Parasite...

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domino harvey
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Re: Claude Chabrol

#118 Post by domino harvey » Wed Jun 05, 2019 1:24 pm


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Re: Claude Chabrol

#119 Post by diamonds » Wed Jun 05, 2019 6:43 pm

BenoitRouilly wrote:
Tue May 28, 2019 6:52 am
There is a bit of La Cérémonie in his Parasite...
Per Letterboxd, it is indeed one of the films he recommends seeing before Parasite.

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Re: Claude Chabrol

#120 Post by BenoitRouilly » Thu Jun 06, 2019 2:51 am

I just saw Parasite and citing La Cérémonie is already a spoiler breaking the rule Bong Joon-ho gave to the press (not to spoil anything after the son and the daughter of the poor family gets hired by the rich family)...
But they are completely different films, with different endings. Same for Kim Ki-young's The Handmaid, the drama revolves around a different articulation of the employer-employee relationships.

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