813-816 Wim Wenders: The Road Trilogy

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swo17
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813-816 Wim Wenders: The Road Trilogy

#1 Post by swo17 » Tue Feb 16, 2016 6:19 pm

Wim Wenders: The Road Trilogy

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In the 1970s, Wim Wenders was among the first true international breakthrough artists of the revolutionary New German Cinema, a filmmaker whose fascination with the physical landscapes and emotional contours of the open road proved to be universal. In the middle of that decade, Wenders embarked on a three-film journey that took him from the wide roads of Germany to the endless highways of the United States and back again. Starring Rüdiger Vogler as the director's alter ego, Alice in the Cities, Wrong Move, and Kings of the Road are dramas of emotional transformation that follow their characters' searches for themselves, all rendered with uncommon soulfulness and visual poetry.

Alice in the Cities

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The first of the road films that would come to define the career of Wim Wenders, the magnificent Alice in the Cities is an emotionally generous and luminously shot journey. A German journalist (Rüdiger Vogler) is driving across the United States to research an article; it's a disappointing trip, in which he is unable to truly connect with what he sees. Things change, however, when he is forced to take a young girl named Alice (Yella Rottländer) with him on his return trip to Germany, after her mother (Lisa Kreuzer)—whom he has just met—leaves the child in his care. Though they initially find themselves at odds, the pair begin to form an unlikely friendship.

Wrong Move

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Wim Wenders updates a late-eighteenth-century novel by Goethe with depth and style, transposing it to 1970s West Germany and giving us the story of an aimless writer (Rüdiger Vogler) who leaves his hometown to find himself and befriends a group of other travelers. Seeking inspiration to help him escape his creative funk, he instead discovers the limits of attempts to refashion one's identity. One of the director's least seen but earthiest and most devastating soul searches, Wrong Move features standout supporting performances from New German Cinema regulars Hanna Schygulla and Peter Kern and, in her first film appearance, Nastassja Kinski.

Kings of the Road

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A roving film projector repairman (Rüdiger Vogler) saves the life of a depressed psychologist (Hanns Zischler) who has driven his Volkswagen into a river, and they end up on the road together, traveling from one rural German movie theater to another. Along the way, the two men, each running from his past, bond over their shared loneliness. Kings of the Road, captured in gorgeous com-positions by cinematographer Robby Müller and dedicated to Fritz Lang, is a love letter to the cinema, a moving and funny tale of male friendship, and a portrait of a country still haunted by war.

DIRECTOR-APPROVED SPECIAL EDITION FEATURES

• New, restored 4K digital transfers of all three films, commissioned by the Wim Wenders Foundation and supervised by director Wim Wenders
• Audio commentaries for all three films, featuring Wenders and actors Rüdiger Vogler and Yella Rottländer on Alice in the Cities, and featuring Wenders on Wrong Move and Kings of the Road
• New interview with Wenders, directed and conducted by filmmaker Michael Almereyda
• New interviews with Vogler, Kreuzer, Rottländer, and actors Hanna Schygulla and Hanns Zischler
• Outtakes and Super 8 home movies
Restoring Time, a 2015 short about the restoration work done by the Wim Wenders Foundation
Same Player Shoots Again (1967) and Silver City Revisited (1968), two newly restored early short films by Wenders
• New English subtitle translations
• PLUS: A book featuring essays on the films by filmmaker Allison Anders, author James Robison, and critic Nick Roddick

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Re: 813-816 Wim Wenders: The Road Trilogy

#2 Post by hearthesilence » Tue Feb 16, 2016 6:41 pm

We'll have to wait and see re: the encoding, but the restorations themselves were amazing. I went to see them at MoMA about a year ago and posted detailed notes in another thread (the Wenders' thread?) - all the restoration info was displayed in cards before the actual feature. Would love to see The State of Things next.

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Re: 813-816 Wim Wenders: The Road Trilogy

#3 Post by oh yeah » Tue Feb 16, 2016 9:31 pm

Criterion is on a roll -- I've been wanting to see these films, along with The American Friend, for years, so this is fantastic.

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Re: 813-816 Wim Wenders: The Road Trilogy

#4 Post by kristophers » Fri Feb 19, 2016 12:08 pm

oh yeah wrote:Criterion is on a roll -- I've been wanting to see these films, along with The American Friend, for years, so this is fantastic.
I'm pleased they are coming out so soon after the retrospective tour. I thought maybe we'd have to wait a while.

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Re: 813-816 Wim Wenders: The Road Trilogy

#5 Post by FrauBlucher » Fri Apr 29, 2016 5:52 am


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Re: 813-816 Wim Wenders: The Road Trilogy

#6 Post by FrauBlucher » Tue May 17, 2016 6:14 am


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Re: 813-816 Wim Wenders: The Road Trilogy

#7 Post by worriedfire » Thu May 19, 2016 6:25 am

I'm going (sort of) region free tomorrow, after years of debating whether or not to. The McCabe & Mrs. Miller was what finally made me decide it's worth it, but I'll make sure to pick this up as soon as it's made available over here. Been meaning to get to these films for the longest time. A bit disappointing that two of the three commentary tracks are in German, though. I doubt I'll get a whole lot out of them with my subpar primary school German, though I'm always happy when I see a Fassbinder film and someone mentions a "Sonderangebot" (which happens suprisingly often). It's more-or-less the only thing I remember.

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Re: 813-816 Wim Wenders: The Road Trilogy

#8 Post by CSM126 » Thu May 19, 2016 7:03 am

worriedfire wrote: A bit disappointing that two of the three commentary tracks are in German, though. I doubt I'll get a whole lot out of them with my subpar primary school German
…turn the subtitles on?

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Re: 813-816 Wim Wenders: The Road Trilogy

#9 Post by worriedfire » Thu May 19, 2016 9:14 am

CSM126 wrote:
worriedfire wrote: A bit disappointing that two of the three commentary tracks are in German, though. I doubt I'll get a whole lot out of them with my subpar primary school German
…turn the subtitles on?
I (wrongly) assumed they weren't subtitled since Criterion's website didn't specify that they were. My bad. With Wenders being fluent in English I would, of course, have preffered it to be in English, but subtitles are definitely better than nothing.

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Re: 813-816 Wim Wenders: The Road Trilogy

#10 Post by cdnchris » Thu May 19, 2016 9:38 am

Yes, the two German language commentaries have subtitles. Other than their original 400 Blows DVD all of their non-English commentaries have subtitles.

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Re: 813-816 Wim Wenders: The Road Trilogy

#11 Post by FrauBlucher » Thu Jun 09, 2016 5:52 am


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Re: 813-816 Wim Wenders: The Road Trilogy

#12 Post by med » Tue Jul 12, 2016 3:26 pm

I have been working through the commentaries on this set over the last few days; I'm wondering why Criterion bothered to license them (and went to the added trouble of commissioning subtitles for two of them). Alice in the Cities is largely Wenders and the actors making small talk. ("Did I come up with that line or did you?" "I don't recall. I think you did.") The solo tracks on the other films fare slightly better, but too often fall into narrating what's happening on screen or simply repeating himself. The latter is especially bad in Kings of the Road, given that film's length.

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Re: 813-816 Wim Wenders: The Road Trilogy

#13 Post by cdnchris » Tue Jul 12, 2016 4:08 pm

I finally got through the Kings of the Road track a few days ago and have to agree. I didn't get much out of them that I didn't already in the briefer interviews spread out over the discs. The Alice one was particularly frustrating. And this may be a dickish thing to say, the subtitles on the two made them harder to get through. I liked the one for American Friend so I was surprised I found the Alice one so plodding, though maybe it was because it was technically two filmmakers talking in that one and they had more interesting things to say about filmmaking, even if Hopper didn't ring in too much. You're right that this track felt more like general chit chat and it did get a bit tiring.

Kings of the Road is just a long movie and I doubt anyone (even Tony Rayns, who kicked ass on the Brighter Summer Day commentary) could have kept it all that engaging, so I have to cut Wenders some slack there.

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Re: 813-816 Wim Wenders: The Road Trilogy

#14 Post by Drucker » Sat Dec 31, 2016 11:06 am

Just finished up this set with Kings Of The Road yesterday and the films finally started to click with me. Initially, I had thought Alice was a nice little film, but Wrong Move didn't click with me at all, and I would even call it frustrating. But it seems with Kings I finally got what Wenders was trying to achieve with these films, and I think an eventual re-watch of all three films will make more sense.

I don't know if I had the wrong expectations going into this film, but these films certainly up-end the idea of a "road trip" movie in much the same way Two-Lane Blacktop does. I think what frustrated me about Wrong Move is I went into it still expecting a traditional plot, especially given the framing of a character that was literally being forced out of his comfort zone. He becomes frustrated with his inability to make sense and find meaning within the lives of the people he encounters.

Kings wisely dismisses the frame, and just drops in our lap two wanderers, who begin by wandering and end-up still wandering. It does an incredible job of constantly confronting the past and then realizing that nothing can come to terms with Germany's recent history. Obviously the old man in Wrong Move is a clearer vehicle against which one can confront the past, but Kings, by not characterizing anything as explicitly-related to the Nazi-past makes everything about the Nazi past. Both films feature an old man that cannot admit what the younger generation wishes it would, but in Kings we are constantly surrounded and entrenched in that past. The machinery especially reminds us that the characters cannot escape the recent past: the newspapers and movie theaters that one assumes were used to spread the Nazi message far and wide. Even the early shot of the Volkswagen factory gives one chills for the same reason.

Again, I'll need to revisit all three films, especially after seeing Kings of the Road last night, to really digest the meaning within. The transfers are all sublime and the soundtrack in Kings was one of my favorites I have ever heard.

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Re: 813-816 Wim Wenders: The Road Trilogy

#15 Post by knives » Mon Jun 26, 2017 3:25 pm

The opening with its black and white nostalgia of small towns as they are dying and cinema obsession made me fearful that Kings of the Road would merely be a German The Last Picture Show, but fortunately Wenders instead does something entirely unique to himself with the cinema being less born out of cinephilia so much as it being the perfect window dressing for isolation in the modern age (though I guess now he'd be a computer repairman). It might not be an optimistic film as such (certainly not on the level of Wings of Desire), but it is easily the funniest and most relaxed I have seen Wenders. The way he quietly allows the pair to just hang out and do stuff which is regularly absurd frees the film entirely from any sort of expectation allowing it to be very silly and juvenile and yet not obnoxious as such (how many films with this much on screen pooping can you say that for). Even the tragedy of the film has this non-plussed dry humour to it that takes away the tragedy and makes it just an acceptable part of everyday life. That part seems really separate from the Wenders I know especially after he became a fanatic. This is not to say any of his films are judgmental, but that many of them with this increasing over time beg for a healing. This film has that as well given the loneliness of the leads, but here the damage is a part of the healing process and a perfectly acceptable action. Why not drown yourself if it gives you some amusement. I guess I mean is that though there is a want to be healed from some unspoken damage there isn't any pain from the damage. The characters just discover that the damage is perfectly livable and merely needs to be adjust to rather than healed. The real shocker coming from the lack of a push by Wenders as mysterious god toward that realization. It makes this such a unique film in his hands that it seems like his best as a result even as that quality of best is solely dependent on his other films being worth examination at a deep level.

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Re: 813-816 Wim Wenders: The Road Trilogy

#16 Post by therewillbeblus » Thu Jun 29, 2017 3:57 am

Kings of the Road may well be the my favorite depiction of the existential, or rather humanistic, experiences of the common man. This film evokes such an intense feeling of identification with these characters, who we don't really get the opportunity to truly 'know' in a "traditional" sense, yet I can't think of a character that I feel more connected to in cinema than these two. For me this film is about the duality, or perhaps continuum, of human experience in regard to the selfish, neurotic, individual and the spiritual, participatory part that surrenders the neuroses to allow oneself to experience interaction with the world, most notably other people, objects, and nature. Each character has many experiences throughout the film of soaking up a moment in time, and appreciating that moment (i.e. the view of a landscape from a tower, small-talk conversations with strangers, a spontaneous silly silhouette shtick). But these moments, and their corresponding feelings, don't remain static and each character fluctuates from these moments of participation to becoming harnessed by their own personal fears, insecurities, resentments, dissatisfaction and core beliefs. This film perfectly and carefully demonstrates the human condition, allowing the audience to relate to these moments of freedom from one's own isolating thoughts as well as validating that the 'selfish' drives to be alone and focus on the importance of our own problems are natural and not simply 'negative,' for ultimately we are all human and emotions are not static. Wenders seems to be showing us that there is hope in not so much resolving these personal internal conflicts but in achieving a sense of serenity through participating in life by appreciating the moments with other people, places and things that may seem small but are actually more significant than they appear.

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Re: 813-816 Wim Wenders: The Road Trilogy

#17 Post by Boosmahn » Thu Aug 02, 2018 9:37 pm

I've been going through this set recently but have stopped short of Kings of the Road, probably because of my dislike for Wrong Move; ironically, this was the film I was most looking forward to in the set. Alice in the Cities was a mixed bag, but once Philip and Alice got on the road it was really enjoyable (the photo booth scene is a treasure).

Maybe Wrong Move would impact me more if I was German? The dialogue, mostly from the mansion's owner, was a bit overbearing... and this is coming from someone who likes dialogue-driven movies. The idea of somebody going on this vast trip only to discover essentially nothing (note the blood-red "WRONG MOVE" at the end) was very appealing but it just fell flat. I want to like it, though. Any fans of the film who can convince me otherwise?

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Re: 813-816 Wim Wenders: The Road Trilogy

#18 Post by knives » Thu Aug 02, 2018 11:08 pm

I find looking at the characters to be the wrong approach and instead the film works as a sort of mood piece where the images are made to give a specific reaction. It is almost like Eisenstein for the heart.

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Kings of the Road (Wim Wenders, 1976)

#19 Post by Mr Sausage » Mon May 27, 2019 6:26 am

DISCUSSION ENDS MONDAY, June 10th.

Members have a two week period in which to discuss the film before it's moved to its dedicated thread in The Criterion Collection subforum. Please read the Rules and Procedures.

This thread is not spoiler free. This is a discussion thread; you should expect plot points of the individual films under discussion to be discussed openly. See: spoiler rules.

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

I encourage members to submit questions, either those designed to elicit discussion and point out interesting things to keep an eye on, or just something you want answered. This will be extremely helpful in getting discussion started. Starting is always the hardest part, all the more so if it's unguided. Questions can be submitted to me via PM.

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Re: Kings of the Road (Wim Wenders, 1976)

#20 Post by therewillbeblus » Mon May 27, 2019 10:02 am

Here’s my write-up from the Road Trilogy thread:
therewillbeblus wrote:
Thu Jun 29, 2017 3:57 am
Kings of the Road may well be the my favorite depiction of the existential, or rather humanistic, experiences of the common man. This film evokes such an intense feeling of identification with these characters, who we don't really get the opportunity to truly 'know' in a "traditional" sense, yet I can't think of a character that I feel more connected to in cinema than these two. For me this film is about the duality, or perhaps continuum, of human experience in regard to the selfish, neurotic, individual and the spiritual, participatory part that surrenders the neuroses to allow oneself to experience interaction with the world, most notably other people, objects, and nature. Each character has many experiences throughout the film of soaking up a moment in time, and appreciating that moment (i.e. the view of a landscape from a tower, small-talk conversations with strangers, a spontaneous silly silhouette shtick). But these moments, and their corresponding feelings, don't remain static and each character fluctuates from these moments of participation to becoming harnessed by their own personal fears, insecurities, resentments, dissatisfaction and core beliefs. This film perfectly and carefully demonstrates the human condition, allowing the audience to relate to these moments of freedom from one's own isolating thoughts as well as validating that the 'selfish' drives to be alone and focus on the importance of our own problems are natural and not simply 'negative,' for ultimately we are all human and emotions are not static. Wenders seems to be showing us that there is hope in not so much resolving these personal internal conflicts but in achieving a sense of serenity through participating in life by appreciating the moments with other people, places and things that may seem small but are actually more significant than they appear.
Kings of the Road remains one of my favorite films, and possibly my favorite depending on the day. I’m excited to hear what others think about Wenders’ transcendental approach, using small everyday moments and often wordless scenes of a man placed in a space, or two characters engaging in a brief attempt at connection to explore the psychology and existential yearning of the human condition.

The scene that always sticks out for me is the man who is near-catatonic after his family has an accident, and the unexpected reactions of our leads toward him. One is hostile and selfish though Wenders hints at a deeper psychology (as in the scene where the men become spontaneously playful with the silhouettes for the children in the movie theater, only to feel intense shame as their masculine guards go up after letting themselves laugh and unbind from social norms). Perhaps the man has no room for another’s pain, as he’s too broken himself in the moment. The other man lends a helping hand, as he continuously buries his emotional turmoil attempting to live a more carefree life until it all catches up with him in one of the final scenes. I don’t see this film as overwhelmingly negative or positive, but moreso a grey line of thinking, all-encompassing and welcoming to emotion, shining a spotlight on certain moments that evoke responses that don’t define us but provide snapshots of a behavior or attitude based on acute emotion.

How do others read this scene, or the mood Wenders is going for throughout? Do you think he’s taking his characters on a journey through spiritual and emotional growth, and do we get the sense that this is a finite process, or that the idea/comfortable joke is that it never really ends, fluctuating until the day we die?

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Re: Kings of the Road (Wim Wenders, 1976)

#21 Post by dda1996a » Mon May 27, 2019 11:10 am

Well their past are metaphysically and concretely haunting them, and it bodes well with Wenders examination of the German identity. To be honest, the only thing holding this back for me is the whole daddy issue part of the film. Everything else is Wenders greatest thing (along with Paris, Texas for me, which suffers from the same problem). As long as we barely know about their past, travelling with them, and meeting all sorts of random folks along the way makes my swoon. The film has a strong air of melancholy, both for the dying art of film, the German identity of the past and for this drifting couple. I think Wenders leaves this open, giving us a spectrum of characters through which we can decide ourselves.
This is, with Paris, Texas, the best of the Wenders/Muller collaboration, the black and white shimmering off the screen. The music is beautiful, and the last shot is so beautiful and on point I couldn't stop smiling.
It's a shame I found The Wrong Move so disappointing, as I love this and Alice.

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Re: Kings of the Road (Wim Wenders, 1976)

#22 Post by domino harvey » Mon May 27, 2019 2:52 pm

And of course I think Wrong Move is his greatest film and this one is the weakest of the trilogy (though I still like it a lot)... of course, it's literally just me and Armond White who also consider Land of Plenty one of Wenders' best (and I'd even say second best, and it's close at that), so what do I know. I do think it's Wrong Move that gives us the feeling of an anti-bildungsroman more so than Kings of the Road, in that there seems at least to be some "lessons" learned in this one, though I think all of the films give us these long journeys that hold a mythic but fleeting resonance for their participants

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Re: Kings of the Road (Wim Wenders, 1976)

#23 Post by Sloper » Mon May 27, 2019 4:01 pm

dda1996a wrote:
Mon May 27, 2019 11:10 am
To be honest, the only thing holding this back for me is the whole daddy issue part of the film.
Yes, the scene between Robert and his dad felt slightly too melodramatic to me - and as in the scene in the border shack at the end, I was a little disappointed that Wenders was starting to spell things out. Part of the beauty of the film (as therewillbeblus and Drucker said in the original thread) is how it drops these characters into our lap and makes us connect with them without telling us all that much about them. I can see how having them 'open up' - to each other, to Pauline, to the dad - is important for the narrative and character development in the final act, and it's not badly done exactly. In fact I mostly loved the scene in the border shack. I just preferred figuring out Bruno's issues for myself, rather than hearing him explain them.

What really amazes me about this film is how it weaves so many themes together in such a complex but organic way. The film's title(s) is a good way into this. In German it's called Im Lauf der Zeit, or 'in the course of time'. The English title is obviously a pluralisation of 'King of the Road', the song we hear at the end, but it's also alluded to in a bit of dialogue where Robert mockingly refers to Bruno as the 'held der landstrasse'; I think 'held' means 'hero' rather than 'king'. Robert is remarking on the fact that this 'hero of the road' has thawed and begun to take an interest in other people, having previously claimed that he was not interested in hearing about Robert's past. As it turns out, this pseudo-heroic imperviousness stems from Bruno's fear of change, and specifically of other people (especially the women he falls in love with) changing in the course of time. His unending road trip - which would stereotypically seem to figure constant change and an inability to settle - is in fact a way of making time stand still, preventing himself or his relationships with others from growing or developing. Like the hobo in the song, he ranges freely across an infinite space but re-lives the same moment ('two hours of pushing broom') over and over again. But in the course of the film's very long, seemingly uneventful running time, he acquires a partner, and this small change in his routine, the addition of an 's' to the song title, is a very significant one. It's interesting that while Bruno is on a never-ending road trip, Robert ('Kamikaze') begins the film by dramatically ending his journey and destroying his mode of transportation. It's a relatively subtle variation on the sort of 'character contrast' you normally get at the start of a buddy movie, as is their final exchange: although they're out of each other's earshot, Bruno affirms his ongoing connection to this now-absent friend ('Kamikaze, don't think I haven't seen you') and Robert affirms his newly optimistic approach to life ('getting by better and better, aren't we?'); Bruno's line also addresses Robert's need to be seen, and Robert's addresses Bruno's need to embrace change. Without being sentimental about it, there is a kind of down-to-earth heroism in the way these two damaged men have made the effort to engage with each other. The film's multiple titles all come to fruition as we see how, by simply passing time together, Bruno and Robert have attained a kind of mastery over their own lives.

I also love how all these themes are flagged up in the first scene, when the old man reminisces about playing music to accompany Die Nibelungen and Ben-Hur, two gargantuan epics of the silent era that were largely concerned with heroic kings, queens and princes, and when he then ruefully admits that he was out of work for a long time because he was a member of the Nazi party. This is a similarly epic film in terms of sheer length, but it defines heroism in terms of openness and vulnerability, rather than endurance, stoicism, and vengeance. The old man's hesitant confession is the first of many moments when someone tries to keep something private but ends up revealing it, and isn't punished or rejected for doing so. Another small example comes when Robert introduces himself as 'Lander', Bruno says 'Sorry?', and Robert gingerly reveals his full name. It feels like Bruno probably heard him the first time, but pretended not to in order to give him an excuse to reveal a little more about himself, which is a lovely way of setting up their relationship from the start. And the most striking example is of course when we hear Bruno say he's going for a piss, but then the camera watches him unflinchingly as he defecates on the beach - which as far as I know is an unprecedented violation of an actor's privacy. It's as if the film is saying, 'this is what the heroes of a modern epic need to be, and this is what we need to see them doing'. As a viewer, you sort of have to go through this process of saying, 'oh god do I really need to see this?', and then realising afterwards, 'yes I supposed I did'. A scene like this would have destroyed the credibility of Siegfried or Judah Ben-Hur, but Wenders asks us to embrace it, and to feel more invested in and connected to this character's journey as a result. Not the best point to end on, maybe...

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Re: Kings of the Road (Wim Wenders, 1976)

#24 Post by soundchaser » Mon May 27, 2019 4:11 pm

Wrong Move is my favorite of the trilogy as well. I haven’t seen this one in several years, but I remember finding it very claustrophobic, in spite of its open vistas. Whereas the former feels like an actual journey has been taken. I know this is a sort of superficial analysis based on memories — probably need to give the whole trilogy a rewatch.

And to follow up on one of Sloper’s points: yes, that defecation scene, coming as early as it does, really sets a tone. It’s an unusually bathetic way of presenting a protagonist on-screen, and although I don’t think the effect is necessarily humorous, I remember being struck by the result of the defecation itself being so...large. And the way Wenders frames things has stuck with me as well. The relative size of Vogler compared to the beach makes it feel like we’re watching a “primitive” man in an old nature documentary — like we’re seeing something at once a part of us and apart from us.

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Re: Kings of the Road (Wim Wenders, 1976)

#25 Post by dda1996a » Mon May 27, 2019 4:45 pm

[for some reason this didn't post earlier. I respond to Domino's last sentence. Thought everything I wrote was gone forever]
They do. Alice also has a beautiful last shot that corresponds beautifully to it's first. Wrong Move started fine enough but I just disliked every character and from my experience, when Wenders has his character actually talk to each other I tune out (see also the ridiculously awful monologue at the end of Wings). I think Wenders works best for me when his characters just taciturnly experience the world and the people around them, usually with some beautiful music accompanying the beauty of Muller's camera. Which is this film for almost the entire movie. I'm glad I caught this (and State of Things, an underrated Wenders if there was ever one) on the touring retrospective as they need to be experienced on the largest screen.
One thing I really liked about the trilogy is how not only Vogler shows up multiple times, and Kreuzer's roles in the two parts I like are really beautiful (especially in here. I just love everything in this film involving the cinema, as all of them are great scenes).

Aside from Pina and Submergence (the first great, the second incredibly disappoint but not awful as I expected) are the only late Wenders I've seen, even though I have seen only to Wings (discluding his 2nd and 3rd film and Hammett).

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