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PostPosted: Mon Aug 08, 2016 1:49 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2014 5:04 pm
Location: Hants, UK
Can we assume this is basically a sign they're adding the Director's Cut? According to the fan who originally put the cut together, it is being cleared by the studio with help from De Palma, so hopefully Arrow can get a similar agreement with Universal for their Region B release. If they have to put it on a second disc, I can see them upgrading this to a Limited Edition like they did with Thief for example...maybe even adding some more extras in the process!


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 08, 2016 5:48 pm 
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I can't imagine them possibly saying the wait would be worth it if it weren't the directors cut - I'm a bit surprised that it's apparently enough for a five-month delay but as usual with Arrow a little bit of patience should result in the best release possible.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2016 11:11 am 
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Updated Raising Cain specs:

Quote:
LIMITED EDITION CONTENTS
•Limited Edition [3000 copies] containing two versions of the film on Blu-ray and the theatrical version on DVD
•Optional English subtitles for the deaf and hard-of-hearing on both versions
•Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Nathanael Marsh
•Booklet featuring new writing on the film by Anne Billson
DISCS 1 & 2: THEATRICAL VERSION [BLU-RAY & DVD]
•High Definition digital transfer of the theatrical version
•Hickory Dickory Doc, a brand-new interview with actor John Lithgow
•The Man in My Life, an interview with actor Steven Bauer
•Have You Talked to the Others?, an interview with editor Paul Hirsch
•Three Faces of Henry, an interview with actor Gregg Henry
•The Cat's in the Bag, an interview with actor Tom Bower
•A Little Too Late for That, an interview with actor Mel Harris
•Raising Pino, a brand-new interview with composer Pino Donaggio
•Father’s Day, a brand-new video essay about the multiple versions of Raising Cain by Chris Dumas, author of Un-American Psycho: Brian De Palma and the Political Invisible
•Theatrical Trailer
DISC 3: DIRECTOR’S CUT [LIMITED EDITION BLU-RAY EXCLUSIVE]
•Raising Cain: The Director's Cut, a De Palma-endorsed recreation of the film by Peet Belder Gelderblom, re-ordered as originally planned
•Changing Cain: Brian De Palma's Cult Classic Restored, an introduction by Gelderblom to the Director’s Cut
•Raising Cain Re-Cut, a video essay by Gelderblom on the origins and differences of the Director’s Cut


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 5:59 pm 
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Just saw Obsession. I'm actually not a fan of DePalma's work, despite enjoying a good number of his set pieces over the years if not an entire film, and this one does not change my views of his filmmaking. But despite a painfully derivative and an awkward story, the score does indeed make a difference and it's a beautiful marriage of music and character during many of the infatuation/courtship/love scenes.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 8:30 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2014 5:04 pm
Location: Hants, UK
I've not actually watched Obsession yet, but I saw Sisters quite recently and loved it - the Herrmann score is really effective! That film basically solidified him as a favourite filmmaker of mine, and I subsequently enjoyed that Baumbach/Paltrow documentary shortly after. Looking forward to Body Double arriving this weekend (coming from new UK label Indicator), and I also bought a copy of Phantom of the Paradise (and have Raising Cain finally arriving in January). Might even revisit The Untouchables again soon, which has some excellent sequences (scored by one of the greatest, Ennio Morricone).

As for the finalised Raising Cain specs, I'm very happy we're getting everything the Shout Factory disc got plus an interview with the composer, a video essay, and a booklet (possibly even a slipcover too if recent 'upgraded' releases are anything to go by). Be interesting to see if Arrow use a dual-layered or single-layered disc for the Director's Cut disc - I'm thinking they will use BD-50 to match the Shout release, but they have gone BD-25 before (e.g. Bride of Re-Animator). Guess it depends how comfortable they are with the authoring and whether they actually need to save a few pennies or not (this version now being limited to 3000 copies, but many people have pre-ordered it at the very reasonable HMV/Amazon price of £12.99, though I dunno if that makes much difference to Arrow).


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 20, 2016 8:43 pm 
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I watched a bit of Obsession again, and I have to say, this may be the De Palma film for deep skeptics of his work.

It's not his most technically accomplished film, but it may embody his work better than anything else he's done, in a way that can be seen as critical of his vision (or lack thereof).

De Palma's harshest critics claim he thinks he's Hitchcock, and that he isn't because he lacks the genuine fascination with human behavior (or what makes us human). Some claim he's more interested in duplicating Hitchcock's films than creating anything personal himself.

One of De Palma's favorite films is of course Vertigo, and Obsession is obviously heavily inspired by it. The harshest critics say it's De Palma just trying to remake Vertigo, just as Sisters was a pastiche of other Hitchcock films.

If you believe there's a lot of truth to that, I would say that even though Obsession may be repeating the same approach, the context makes it much more engaging. Mirroring Scottie's relationship to Madeleine, here is De Palma fixated on a film that he not only adores but is compelled to reproduce as closely as he can, short of a straight up remake. If it seems too close to a rip-off, that's the point - it's not lack of imagination so much as a perpetual compulsion on De Palma's part, telegraphed by a scene in Obsession when one of the main characters is working on an art restoration - she wonders if she should try holding on to an original element of the work that is very degraded, and her suitor tells her to "hold on to it." The character is obviously echoing his own inability to let go of the wife he's lost (and will try replacing with a lookalike), but this spells out De Palma's modus operandi with Obsession. De Palma even gets Herrmann again to do the score (and to drive the point home, he used Vertigo's score as a temp track in order to convince a producer to let him hire Herrmann).

At worst, if you were really dismissive of this work, you can say it sounds like a pathetic exercise in trying to replicate a film that De Palma could never approach, giving us a hollow thriller instead of a profound, disturbing masterpiece with a deeply felt tragedy. Scottie trying to revive Madeleine through another woman could be thought along the same terms - that is, what's going on between Scottie and Judy is necrophilia instead of real love. But I think both assessments (of Obsession and of Scottie & Judy) are ultimately wrong. Judy really is in love with Scottie and there's a terrible yet honest sadness in how she allows Scottie to do something so awful to her. I'm not moved by Obsession the way I am by Vertigo, but I find it compelling for what it sees in Vertigo and what it regurgitates. That is, it may not come close to reaching the same heights as Vertigo, but its reach is fascinating.

And thanks to Herrmann, Obsession does have real feeling - as I mentioned in an earlier post, his score articulates beautifully what's going on between the two romantic leads. The best is when Robertson goes back and follows her after work. Not a word is exchanged, he stays behind her. It builds to a marvelous peak, when she goes into her home and he comes out on the street. Watch as he walks and pulls up, and how the music shifts and subtly augments that moment. His back's to you and he's in long shot, but with that bit of walking in synch with that perfect music, you can feel Robertson's heart begin to flutter. And then the killer is when we fade to a shot that drifts down from a ceiling to Robertson, who's in the foreground of a deep focus shot. As that camera floats down, listen to those soft, stray notes plucked on the soundtrack. When we finally land on Robertson (seen in profile, deep in thought), you can feel his mind miles away, thinking only of her.

Watch that scene alone and without music - what's going on is still clear, but you don't feel the intoxicating pull that's swallowing him up. It could be a cold case of stalking that elicits no empathy. That changes with Herrmann's score.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2017 2:54 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jun 13, 2014 1:14 pm
Raising Cain is now in stock at the Arrow store


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2017 11:01 pm 
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Raising Cain is awful in every way a film can be bad. I watched the director's cut and the special feature on the differences. As suspected, nothing short of it being a different film could help matters. Such a tiring, broad movie, counterintuitively arranged and ludicrously heightened to the point of second-hand embarrassment at its winking "Isn't this just the worst" absurdity. I guess there's an audience for ultra-arch wanking, but no thanks


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2017 11:41 pm 

Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2009 7:45 pm
domino harvey wrote:
Raising Cain is awful in every way a film can be bad. I watched the director's cut and the special feature on the differences. As suspected, nothing short of it being a different film could help matters. Such a tiring, broad movie, counterintuitively arranged and ludicrously heightened to the point of second-hand embarrassment at its winking "Isn't this just the worst" absurdity. I guess there's an audience for ultra-arch wanking, but no thanks

I don't know, it's kind of an unpleasant film and has a lot of problems but its manic absurdity is still more interesting to me than Carrie, the incredibly overrated The Untouchables, The Fury, or the completely disastrous Bonfire of the Vanities, to name a few. It just barely skates by on its winking OTT-ness.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 11:23 am 
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Yeah, I'd put it towards the middle of the De Palma catalog, to be honest - it doesn't do the cardinal sin of his worst (being dull) but other than the last set-piece which is typically insane it's kind of just petering along. I've not yet seen the Director's Cut edit though I'm looking forward to it. For a guy who almost always has a real flair for ending shots it's also one of his best, which is saying something.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 18, 2017 6:51 am 
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Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 4:30 pm
Location: Chapel-en-le-Frith, Derbyshire, UK
The ending shot is so amusing it turns up again:
[Reveal] Spoiler:
at the end of Passion!


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