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PostPosted: Fri Nov 10, 2017 1:31 am 
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Joined: Fri May 16, 2008 4:43 pm
Still think you’re jumping to far too many conclusions. And she doesn’t say he’s “not a nice man,” I believe she playfully calls him a bastard or something along those lines - but are old friends not able to speak of one another that way? There’s still the tone in this post like this was a hit piece of some kind - I’m not sure why you’re affording Godard a healthy amount of benefit of the doubt with regard to the level of warmth and affection behind his actions, but dismissing Varda for far less than what Godard (seemingly, none of us know how this played out behind the scenes) did.

I mean, jeez - if the guy really was coerced and hoodwinked into appearing so terribly as you describe, could he at least have done Varda the professional courtesy of telling her in person that despite her intended ending, he’d prefer not to appear in the final cut?


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 10, 2017 3:19 am 

Joined: Mon Jul 20, 2009 12:28 pm
To me, and probably the general viewer, the scene plays as critical of Godard. Nasty old bastard. The general viewer doesn't have this history, and is presented with the "fact" that JLG sucks. And he might, but, why put that at the end of your otherwise cheery film?

And keep in mind this a refusal to be FILMED, not necessarily a refusal to meet.

I am interested in hearing why this scene is even in the movie. Yes, it ties into the other guy's reluctance to remove his sunglasses. But how else does it fit. The film purports to celebrate the general public, no?

Oh, the scene got the movie a lot of attention. The Godard bit features in every article I have read about the film, not to mention the infamous NYFF Q&A.


Last edited by J Adams on Fri Nov 10, 2017 3:40 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 10, 2017 3:36 am 
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Joined: Fri May 16, 2008 4:43 pm
Still quite confused as to what is wrong with any of this. Why shouldn’t the scene be included? Why shouldn’t the film get attention?

More to the point: why has Godard earned your steely defense to this degree? Can he not speak for himself if he so chooses? The backlash against him from this isn’t exactly overwhelming. It’s one of the most memorable endings in any film in recent years, largely because of him. Beyond that it’s a lot of grey area, no one is picketing his home or refusing to make his films over this small personal moment that was shared via the ending of this small documentary.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 10, 2017 3:46 am 

Joined: Mon Jul 20, 2009 12:28 pm
The scene gives rise to a good ending, and I presume Godard doesn't care. (Although I personally would not want my house put on a publicly released film.) Ultimately I just feel that Varda abuses a connection (which was possibly severed 40 something years ago, who knows?) to someone way more famous, and that seems antithetical to both her persona and the film.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 10, 2017 11:29 am 
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Joined: Fri May 16, 2008 4:43 pm
Do you think she views it (or Godard views it) as a fame-related networking situation? They're 89 and 86 years old, and were personal friends during the height of their careers (though one might argue, I suppose, that Varda has never been as celebrated or as popular as she is now). Isn't it a pretty cynical viewpoint to be looking at it as "severing a connection" as if he's no longer going to write her a recommendation letter?

Your primary issue when it comes to the film, in my view, seems to be downplaying Varda. Her talent, her popularity (or, okay, fame), the idea that anyone might want to maintain a lifelong friendship with her on- or off-camera, her contributions to the art that she and JR produced in this film... you take issue with all of these things in ways that just seem diametrically opposed to both what's on screen and what the reception of the film has been. There's no legal requirement that you like the film, but the reasons don't seem rooted in concrete, contextual reality. They read much more like a longstanding personal grudge than a criticism of the work itself.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 11, 2017 1:48 am 

Joined: Mon Jul 20, 2009 12:28 pm
Enough said. Thanks.


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