Passages

Discuss films and filmmakers of the 20th century (and even a little of the 19th century). Threads may contain spoilers.
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Dylan
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 9:28 pm

Re: Passages

#7401 Post by Dylan » Wed Jul 25, 2018 6:39 pm

Composer Patrick Williams, whose many feature film scores include Used Cars and Cry-Baby, and he also did a ton of television including The Mary Tyler Moore Show.

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MichaelB
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Re: Passages

#7402 Post by MichaelB » Sun Jul 29, 2018 10:37 am

Tomasz Stańko, the trumpeter and composer who was arguably the most important figure in Polish jazz after the great Krzysztof Komeda. Like Komeda, he also contributed to films, with over a dozen original scores, and as a performer he can be heard on many more - and not just in Poland: he's the trumpeter on the soundtrack of Homeland.

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FrauBlucher
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 8:28 pm
Location: Greenwich Village

Re: Passages

#7403 Post by FrauBlucher » Sun Jul 29, 2018 11:09 pm


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thirtyframesasecond
Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2007 1:48 pm

Re: Passages

#7404 Post by thirtyframesasecond » Mon Jul 30, 2018 8:55 am

FrauBlucher wrote:
Sun Jul 29, 2018 11:09 pm
Pro Wrestler Nikolai Volkoff... 70.
Wow, that's probably old by wrestling standards. Didn't Grandmaster Sexay die in the last few days as well? Ah, the good old days when international politics played out in the WWE....I preferred the Sgt Slaughter turned by General Adnan/Colonel Mustafa story during the first Iraq War best.

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FrauBlucher
Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 8:28 pm
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Passages

#7405 Post by FrauBlucher » Mon Jul 30, 2018 9:06 am

thirtyframesasecond wrote:
FrauBlucher wrote:
Sun Jul 29, 2018 11:09 pm
Pro Wrestler Nikolai Volkoff... 70.
Wow, that's probably old by wrestling standards. Didn't Grandmaster Sexay die in the last few days as well? Ah, the good old days when international politics played out in the WWE....I preferred the Sgt Slaughter turned by General Adnan/Colonel Mustafa story during the first Iraq War best.
Kolloff and Volkoff... played the Russian bad guys.
Image

Craig Wallace
Joined: Fri May 05, 2017 9:22 am

Re: Passages

#7406 Post by Craig Wallace » Mon Jul 30, 2018 1:55 pm


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flyonthewall2983
Joined: Mon Jun 27, 2005 3:31 pm
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Re: Passages

#7407 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Tue Jul 31, 2018 5:40 am

thirtyframesasecond wrote:
Mon Jul 30, 2018 8:55 am
FrauBlucher wrote:
Sun Jul 29, 2018 11:09 pm
Pro Wrestler Nikolai Volkoff... 70.
Wow, that's probably old by wrestling standards. Didn't Grandmaster Sexay die in the last few days as well? Ah, the good old days when international politics played out in the WWE....I preferred the Sgt Slaughter turned by General Adnan/Colonel Mustafa story during the first Iraq War best.
Grandmaster Sexay (because it has to be said on this site at least once) was Jerry Lawler's son, Brian. I really remember him more for reading about his exploits in Lawler's Memphis territory in the Apter mags, than his WWF stint. Brickhouse Brown, who similarly worked in that 90's independent scene died as well.

I don't want to say Volkoff was pre-steroids but you can tell a lot of his strength was pretty natural. Big and bulky, but he could occasionally throw a dropkick or leap into the ring over the top rope with a lot of ease. Anyway, this picture and story from WWE talent Natalya (Canadian, not Russian) about him was pretty cute.

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Roger Ryan
Joined: Wed Apr 28, 2010 12:04 pm
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Re: Passages

#7408 Post by Roger Ryan » Tue Jul 31, 2018 8:12 am

Craig Wallace wrote:
Mon Jul 30, 2018 1:55 pm
Bernard Hepton
Looks like The Guardian used Anton Rodgers' image from The Organization for the second photo in the obituary instead of Hepton's - for a moment there I thought the claim "...as an actor, he could transform himself without makeup..." indicated a true ability to shapeshift!

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djproject
Joined: Sat Oct 09, 2010 3:41 pm
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Re: Passages

#7409 Post by djproject » Tue Jul 31, 2018 2:42 pm

Sam Mehran, songwriter/producer (best known for Test Icicles and Outer Limitz)

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mfunk9786
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Joined: Fri May 16, 2008 4:43 pm
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Re: Passages

#7410 Post by mfunk9786 » Thu Aug 02, 2018 9:42 pm


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thirtyframesasecond
Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2007 1:48 pm

Re: Passages

#7411 Post by thirtyframesasecond » Sun Aug 05, 2018 5:37 am

Barry Chuckle. A 73yo children's entertainer, who with brother Paul, had a very, very long running show on the BBC. Hard to explain it really as it would never be commissioned now. Two old guys doing end of the pier, slapstick type humour.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-45074955

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Aunt Peg
Joined: Fri Dec 21, 2012 5:30 am

Re: Passages

#7412 Post by Aunt Peg » Sun Aug 05, 2018 6:24 am

Moshé Mizrahi director of Madame Rosa (well overdue for an English friendly Blu Ray release) has passed away:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moshé_Mizrahi

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domino harvey
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Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:42 pm

Re: Passages

#7413 Post by domino harvey » Mon Aug 06, 2018 1:42 am


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MichaelB
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Re: Passages

#7414 Post by MichaelB » Mon Aug 06, 2018 5:16 am

Piotr Szulkin, by some distance Poland's most important sci-fi filmmaker.

Sadly, the likes of Golem (1979), War of the Worlds: Next Century (1981), O-Bi, O-Ba: The End of Civilization (1985), Ga, ga. Glory to the Heroes (1986) and his last film King Ubu (2003) are virtually unknown outside Poland (although an English-friendly DVD box set of the first four was released there a few years ago), which says more about distributor timidity and the challenges of pigeonholing his iconoclastic work than it does about its own intrinsic merit.

I wrote these capsule reviews a decade or so ago:
War of the Worlds: Next Century (Wojna światów – następne stulecie, d. Piotr Szulkin, 1981)

The sly opening dedication to H.G.Wells and Orson Welles works on at least two levels: as an acknowledgement of the men who respectively wrote and adapted the original ‘The War of the Worlds’, and as a warning not to take anything in the film at face value. Sure enough, in addition to constructing a memorably sour Orwellian vision of a near-future Poland after a visit by Martians (it’s unlikely the references to invasion and occupation would have been lost on its original audience), Szulkin also examines how the media are complicit in both its presentation and in behind-the-scenes string-pulling, and his view of the population-lulling effect of “reality television” (which is even called that at one point) is worryingly prescient. Fittingly, the protagonist Iron Idem (Roman Wilhelmi) is a television anchorman who first realises that something might be awry is when he’s given an entirely new script to read mere seconds before he goes on air.

O-Bi, O-Ba: The End of Civilisation (O-Bi, O-Ba. Koniec cywilizacji, d. Piotr Szulkin, 1985)

While the previous film was set in a just about recognisable near future, here civilisation has collapsed completely, with a gaggle of survivors of an unspecified catastrophe waiting for their own Godot in the form of a mysterious Ark that will take them to a far better place. Government apparatchik Soft (Jerzy Stuhr) knows that it’s all a propagandist lie concocted to stave off absolute despair – but is startled to find his normally sane colleagues taking it seriously. Szulkin’s film certainly doesn’t lack ideas, and his realisation of a crumbling civilisation is highly convincing (especially given a clearly limited budget), but this did less for me than the other two: the satirical elements of the others are muted in favour of a setting and narrative that’s a little too familiar to Western eyes.

Ga-ga: Glory to the Heroes (Ga, Ga – Chwała bohaterom, d. Piotr Szulkin, 1986)

The third Szulkin dystopia seems to begin where its predecessors left off, as its unnamed protagonist (Daniel Olbrychski) is blasted from a prison ship onto a supposedly uncharted planet. Instead, he finds a conveniently Polish-speaking world full of people who worship him as a hero and offer him all manner of blandishments, including sexual ones. But he is rightly sceptical: he’s actually being groomed to play the leading role in a hi-tech variant of the crucifixions on Mount Golgotha. This is much closer to blackly comic farce than its predecessors, laced with generous splashings of gore in set-pieces reminiscent of the early work of Sam Raimi and Peter Jackson. Olbrychski plays it admirably straight, while a grotesque Jerzy Stuhr has a whale of a time as a sinister cultural attaché.

King Ubu (Ubu król, d. Piotr Szulkin, 2003)

I haven’t read Alfred Jarry’s play since my teens, so can’t recall too many specifics, but Szulkin’s adaptation certainly catches its blend of the childishly scatological and the politically pointed. The play was also set in Poland, so it’s entirely fitting that its themes have been grafted onto a present-day Poland in imminent danger of complete collapse as its various institutions struggle to retain their authority in the face of Ubu’s arbitrary cruelty. The caricature is often extremely broad, and performances are borderline demented, but that’s true to Jarry too. This wouldn’t be my first recommendation for someone new to Szulkin, but it’s good to see him back to making features after a break of over a decade.

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Feego
Joined: Thu Aug 16, 2007 7:30 pm
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Re: Passages

#7415 Post by Feego » Mon Aug 06, 2018 9:25 am

My introduction to Charlotte Rae was in the garish children's TV movie The Worst Witch, where she has a dual role as both a good witch (basically Mrs. Garrett with a British accent) and her evil, pink-haired sister.

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lacritfan
Life is one big kevyip
Joined: Wed Dec 05, 2007 6:39 pm
Location: Los Angeles

Re: Passages

#7416 Post by lacritfan » Mon Aug 06, 2018 10:12 am


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mfunk9786
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Re: Passages

#7417 Post by mfunk9786 » Mon Aug 06, 2018 12:23 pm


AisleSeat
Joined: Thu Jul 24, 2008 6:16 pm
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Re: Passages

#7418 Post by AisleSeat » Tue Aug 07, 2018 12:31 pm

Masahiko Tsugawa.

Masahiko Tsugawa, who appeared in Crazed Fruit as well as the films of Juzo Itami, among others, has passed away at age 78 due to heart failure. As his death has yet to be reported in English media, the above link to the Sankei Shimbum, in Japanese, will suffice for now.

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bearcuborg
Joined: Fri Sep 14, 2007 2:30 am
Location: Philadelphia via Chicago

Re: Passages

#7419 Post by bearcuborg » Tue Aug 07, 2018 4:46 pm


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L.A.
Joined: Thu May 28, 2009 7:33 am
Location: Helsinki, Finland

Re: Passages

#7420 Post by L.A. » Wed Aug 08, 2018 1:04 pm


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Dylan
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 9:28 pm

Re: Passages

#7421 Post by Dylan » Thu Aug 09, 2018 1:15 pm

Cinematographer Richard H. Cline, who did brilliant work on The Fury, Body Heat, and others.

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colinr0380
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 4:30 pm
Location: Chapel-en-le-Frith, Derbyshire, UK

Re: Passages

#7422 Post by colinr0380 » Thu Aug 09, 2018 1:54 pm

It is interesting that Kline worked on both The Boston Strangler and The Andromeda Strain, which both have sequences in which the action splits apart into multiple frames, which seemed to be a technique that was briefly in vogue from the mid 60s into the mid 70s.

It is also interesting to note that post-Andromeda Strain Kline was also the cinematographer on the rather overlooked adaptation of a Michael Critchton novel, 1974's The Terminal Man

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domino harvey
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Re: Passages

#7423 Post by domino harvey » Thu Aug 09, 2018 2:08 pm

colinr0380 wrote:
Thu Aug 09, 2018 1:54 pm
It is interesting that Kline worked on both The Boston Strangler and The Andromeda Strain, which both have sequences in which the action splits apart into multiple frames, which seemed to be a technique that was briefly in vogue from the mid 60s into the mid 70s.
It's because of Expo 67, which is hard to recreate or imagine now but the YouTube clip I linked shows enough to get the idea and how influential it was

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colinr0380
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Location: Chapel-en-le-Frith, Derbyshire, UK

Re: Passages

#7424 Post by colinr0380 » Thu Aug 09, 2018 2:34 pm

That's amazing! It almost seems as if this kind of technique was in opposition to Cinerama, in the sense that Cinerama was trying to make a seamless all-encompassing experience, whilst this technique of highlighting aspects of a frame within boxes celebrates that lack of matching between frames (which makes the moments when the frames do present a unified image more powerful too) in order to allow it to use juxtaposition instead of editing to provide a shot and countershot reaction. Here you do not have to cut away but show both participants inside their own frame simultaneously. I especially like the use of 'above' and 'below' boxes in that video as Heaven and Earth, with life taking place on the parnorama of screens in the middle!

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Aunt Peg
Joined: Fri Dec 21, 2012 5:30 am

Re: Passages

#7425 Post by Aunt Peg » Fri Aug 10, 2018 9:49 am

Actor Richard Dix has passed away.

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