Festival Circuit 2019

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Omensetter
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Re: Festival Circuit 2019

#51 Post by Omensetter » Wed Apr 24, 2019 8:51 am

Alejo Moguillansky's Castro is one of the best of 2009 (I admittedly haven't seen anything of his since then), so that's straight-at-the-top of most anticipated of the Quinzaine. If I'm not mistaken, it might be available to rent on MUBI.

I'm hearing rumors of Mendoza being a late addition to Competition and, you know, no.

kubelkind
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Re: Festival Circuit 2019

#52 Post by kubelkind » Wed Apr 24, 2019 11:50 am

Yep. Great to see Moguillansky has a new one, and this may have a higher profile (and better distribution) than his recent stuff. The Little Match Girl was one of my absolute favourites of recent years, mixing documentary, fiction and essay modes reminiscent of Varda at her very best. A seriously underrated director, I think.

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therewillbeblus
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Re: Festival Circuit 2019

#53 Post by therewillbeblus » Wed Apr 24, 2019 10:08 pm

For those in the Boston area, IFF Boston is underway with the Brattle in Cambridge showing some screenings this weekend, including In Fabric and The Nightingale, among others.

The link to the festival:
http://iffboston.org/how-to-fest/

Brattle’s lineup:
https://www.brattlefilm.org/category/in ... 9iffboston

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tenia
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Re: Festival Circuit 2019

#54 Post by tenia » Sat Apr 27, 2019 9:53 am

Kechiche's Mektoub my Love - Intermezzo is added to the official competition.

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Omensetter
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Re: Festival Circuit 2019

#55 Post by Omensetter » Sat Apr 27, 2019 10:16 am

Do you have a source?

It's been rumored heavily and is extremely plausible, but there's nothing on the website or on their Twitter.

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furbicide
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Re: Festival Circuit 2019

#56 Post by furbicide » Sun Apr 28, 2019 9:14 am

This is the source being claimed by Vanity Fair and others:

https://www.rtl.fr/culture/cine-series/ ... 7797510855

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Omensetter
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Re: Festival Circuit 2019

#57 Post by Omensetter » Sun Apr 28, 2019 10:54 am

Thank you.

Maybe we can wait until an announcement is made? Fremaux and company must be over the moon with it if they're seriously considering it. The knives will be out for Kechiche (thankfully, Cannes seems to program exclusively based on the film), but I'm wondering if this is still four hours? That'd be the longest film in Competition since Che, which was an anomaly. It's the second part, too. How much does it require familiarization with the first? If I'm a journalist, it seems like an easy call to skip that one. I'd put it OOC.

Including it though would also seem to mean that Tarantino's film is not ready because that'd be an extra six-seven hours of programming. Honestly, I'm not a fan, but I hope they screen Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. I'm trying to think of plausible alternatives to fill these last one or two slots. Roy Andersson would the the best surprise, although I thought it was unready. They're probably maxed out on French titles to include Winocour. Maybe invite Kurosawa back into Competition with his Uzbekistan film?

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domino harvey
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Re: Festival Circuit 2019

#58 Post by domino harvey » Sun Apr 28, 2019 11:47 am

I’m shocked Cannes is going to include the Kechiche in competition, but they’re obv trying to make a statement by doing so. Also, almost all of the films this year are unusually shorter (under two hours) than in recent years, so they can withstand a four hour study of asses

dda1996a
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Re: Festival Circuit 2019

#59 Post by dda1996a » Sun Apr 28, 2019 12:18 pm

According to IMDB the film is 180 minutes...has there ever been a longer than 3hrs film playing in competition? (Meaning more than 190 minutes to be precise)

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domino harvey
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Re: Festival Circuit 2019

#60 Post by domino harvey » Sun Apr 28, 2019 12:20 pm

Winter Sleep was three hours and sixteen minutes long and won. I’m reasonably certain other longer films have been part of the competition over the years

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domino harvey
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Re: Festival Circuit 2019

#61 Post by domino harvey » Sun Apr 28, 2019 12:21 pm

Google quickly confirms:
Dead Souls, Wang Bing’s mammoth documentary on China’s anti-rightist campaign, which, at 496 minutes, is the longest film to ever play in Cannes’ Official Selection

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DarkImbecile
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Re: Festival Circuit 2019

#62 Post by DarkImbecile » Sun Apr 28, 2019 12:25 pm

Dead Souls wasn’t in competition, to clarify

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domino harvey
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Re: Festival Circuit 2019

#63 Post by domino harvey » Sun Apr 28, 2019 12:30 pm

Huh, that was confusingly worded then. Thanks for the clarification

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Omensetter
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Re: Festival Circuit 2019

#64 Post by Omensetter » Sun Apr 28, 2019 3:44 pm

Che was over four hours.

I can see the second Mektoub being three hours (I think the four hour rumors were exactly that). If it's confirmed this week, Tarantino's looking increasingly unlikely, although I can still see Fremaux holding a last-day spot for him if Tarantino wants it. It seems Tarantino would just be better off finishing it for its July release.

Three-Hour Plus Films in Competition this Century
2000 --- Sentimental Destinies
2000 --- Eureka
2008 --- Che
2010 --- Burnt by the Sun 2
2013 --- Blue is the Warmest Color
2014 --- Winter Sleep
2018 --- The Wild Pear Tree
2019 --- A Hidden Life

Yi Yi, Dogville, and Sieranevada were a musical interlude away from the mark.

With nineteen films in Competition, there's certainly room for one long one.

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furbicide
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Re: Festival Circuit 2019

#65 Post by furbicide » Sun Apr 28, 2019 6:58 pm

And let’s not forget the 4-hour-long La Belle Noiseuse, which played main comp and won the Jury Prize. Cannes certainly doesn’t seem to have any aversion to programming long films.


dda1996a
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Re: Festival Circuit 2019

#67 Post by dda1996a » Mon Apr 29, 2019 3:12 pm

Does this mean Reichardt is done with her film?

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mfunk9786
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Re: Festival Circuit 2019

#68 Post by mfunk9786 » Mon Apr 29, 2019 3:19 pm

I saw PT Anderson conduct a weekend-long Jonathan Demme retrospective last year (and sit to view each film) while Phantom Thread was still in the midst of the early editing process. People can have more than one iron in the fire at once, you know!

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Omensetter
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Re: Festival Circuit 2019

#69 Post by Omensetter » Mon Apr 29, 2019 4:40 pm

That's a fantastic jury.

Reichardt should be President, but she doesn't have the Oscars, I suppose.

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domino harvey
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Re: Festival Circuit 2019

#70 Post by domino harvey » Mon Apr 29, 2019 5:56 pm

This is the best jury ever. Hope they don’t blow it, but I have a lot of faith here

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Big Ben
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Re: Festival Circuit 2019

#71 Post by Big Ben » Thu May 02, 2019 6:26 am


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Omensetter
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Re: Festival Circuit 2019

#72 Post by Omensetter » Thu May 02, 2019 8:29 am

...and confirmation of Intermezzo, now officially the longest film in Competition since Che!

Has anyone seen the first Mektoub and can comment on it? I'm usually on top of these things, but I'm certain it wasn't distributed in the States.

Other additions, including Patricio Guzmán, plus run times here: https://www.festival-cannes.com/en/info ... ouncements


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Aunt Peg
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Re: Festival Circuit 2019

#74 Post by Aunt Peg » Mon May 06, 2019 10:18 am

Omensetter wrote:
Thu May 02, 2019 8:29 am

Has anyone seen the first Mektoub and can comment on it? I'm usually on top of these things, but I'm certain it wasn't distributed in the States.
I saw it in June last year at the cinema. Its a long haul and at 3 hours feels it but its a pleasurable watch if a little indulgent at times. The leading man is something of an empty vessel in which the women in the film radiate around - this is not the fault of lead actor Shaïn Boumedine. I just think Kechiche is more interested in the female dynamics at play which leaves Boumedine's character a little stranded at times. The film is all but stolen by newcomer Ophélie Bau - talk about having that 'it' factor that separates some actors from the pack. I'd be surprised if she doesn't have an interesting career ahead of her. She is a force of nature.

Anyway, I liked the film enough to purchase the Artificial Eye DVD and would upgrade to Blu Ray in a heartbeat should an English language release occur sometime in the future.

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DeprongMori
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Re: Festival Circuit 2019

#75 Post by DeprongMori » Wed May 08, 2019 1:52 am

At this year’s San Francisco Silent Film Festival I saw their opening night presentation of The Cameraman, with musical accompaniment by Timothy Brock conducting students from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. The restoration looked great (although IIRC there is still about 3000 feet of film missing, but nothing that affects the narrative flow.) It is a hilarious film and a real treat to see it with a large appreciative audience. It was widely announced that Criterion was responsible for the restoration.

I saw about seventeen other programs in the festival. Some of the highlights/surprises were:

* Clarence L Brown’s 1924 The Signal Tower in a new restoration from Photoplay. It was a railroad-centered domestic thriller filmed in the Mendocino mountains. It had great audience response. I have no idea who will be releasing this to the home market.

* Karel Anton’s 1930 Tonka of the Gallows, a devastating Czech heart-breaker about a prostitute from a small village who is destroyed as a result of an act of human decency. This one caught everyone by surprise. It got a great intro by Eddie Muller, who called it one of the most gut-wrenching films he had ever seen. (Or language of that order.) This was from a Czech archive, so I hold little hope of a Blu-ray release.

* Marcel L’Herbier’s 1920 L’Homme du Large, set on the Breton coast, this was a visually lyrical and poetic film based on a Balzac story. The intertitles were so beautifully presented that the festival had an actor reading the translations rather than marring the image with an overlaid translation. Hoping to track this one down again.

* Erich von Stroheim’s 1928 The Wedding March was luminous, restored from a silver nitrate negative, with Technicolor scenes of the military procession. Hoping this one sees a Blu-ray release finally.

* Franz Osten’s 1928 Shiraz: A Romance of India was one of three films made by Ufa Studios for an Indian producer, with lush production and engaging story involving the inspiration for the Taj Mahal. The three films are among only 8 or 9 surviving Indian silent films out of the more than a thousand produced. The restoration by BFI was pristine and I ordered a copy of their 2017 release immediately after seeing the film.

The only snoozer for me was John Ford’s 1918 oater Hell Bent, starring Harry Carey.

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