Seijun Suzuki: The Early Years

Discuss DVDs and Blu-rays released from Arrow and the films on them.

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dda1996a
Joined: Tue Oct 27, 2015 6:14 am

Re: Seijun Suzuki: The Early Years

#126 Post by dda1996a » Thu Apr 12, 2018 10:14 pm

Yeah me too. Anyone from Europe who can attest about their shipping estimates?

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Ribs
Joined: Fri Jun 13, 2014 1:14 pm

Re: Seijun Suzuki: The Early Years

#127 Post by Ribs » Thu Apr 12, 2018 10:23 pm

Mine from several weeks ago... didn't. A little peeved; hopefully confirmation will appear by morning - not entirely worried yet, considering it's still listed for sale.

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Ribs
Joined: Fri Jun 13, 2014 1:14 pm

Re: Seijun Suzuki: The Early Years

#128 Post by Ribs » Tue Apr 17, 2018 9:09 am

It's very strange that the second set puts Eight Hours of Terror, the first film chronologically, on the second disc. It's the shortest movie, yeah, but only by like five minutes, and they're all under 90!

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Michael Kerpan
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Re: Seijun Suzuki: The Early Years

#129 Post by Michael Kerpan » Tue Apr 17, 2018 9:47 am

Only one more film to watch from the first set -- so I'm almost ready for the second set to arrive...

BTW -- Loved The Incorrigible, probably my favorite from this set. One of Suzuki's most-straight-forward (and well-written) scripts -- but it still feels very Suzuki-ish -- and I loved the Taisho-era and geographical local color.

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mostly asia
Joined: Fri Aug 06, 2010 5:54 pm

Re: Seijun Suzuki: The Early Years

#130 Post by mostly asia » Tue Apr 17, 2018 3:59 pm

received Vol.2 today together with the MoC HHH Box :)

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zedz
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2004 7:24 pm

Re: Seijun Suzuki: The Early Years

#131 Post by zedz » Tue Apr 17, 2018 4:16 pm

I've finished watching the films in Volume 2, and the only dud is Tokyo Knights, a laugh-free quasi-comedy seemingly aimed at teens. The very early 8 Hours of Terror is a really taut thriller, kind of like Mr Thank You reimagined as a violent noir. The Sleeping Beast Within and Smashing the 0-Line are a matched set, with the latter doing a really interesting twist on the crusading reporter of the first by casting the same actor as an ethically murky version of that character.

Man with a Shotgun is a pretty ordinary film for Suzuki, but it's fascinating in terms of genre boundaries, as it's absolutely a western despite not qualifying at all in superficial terms: it's set in Japan, in the present day, in a verdant mountain setting (with a climax on the beach). Chanbara is often cited as the Japanese version of the western, and that makes a lot of sense, but Man with a Shotgun really is a western, with a rowdy saloon and its brassy proprietress, lonely gunslinger new in town, put-upon sheriff, sinister boss with a gang of henchmen, shootouts. . . It's an entire western movie dropped into the Japanese mountains with almost no regard to local traditions, which makes it a great test case for what really constitutes a western.

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