The Films of 2018

Discuss films of the 21st century including current cinema, current filmmakers, and film festivals.
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PfR73
Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2005 6:07 pm

Re: The Films of 2018

#76 Post by PfR73 » Mon Oct 15, 2018 4:12 pm

ianthemovie wrote:
Sat Oct 13, 2018 9:48 am
[EDIT: It's really a shame Giamatti hasn't gotten much film work lately (unless I'm missing some things?). This movie was a reminder of how good he is and it's wonderful to see him play a decent guy and a good husband as opposed to the pathetic loser/schmuck roles that he specialized in--and played very well--in the early 2000s.]
He's been starring in the Showtime series "Billions" for the past couple years, so that may have affected his availability for film work.

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Mr Sheldrake
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2007 9:09 pm
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Re: The Films of 2018

#77 Post by Mr Sheldrake » Mon Oct 15, 2018 6:12 pm

Bad Times at the El Royale
Cynthia Erivo belts out several great pop songs of 50 years ago at some unlikely moments. When the cleverness flags have Cynthia sing, and it's a good idea. Jeff Bridges is the other reason to see this, he invests, I don't know, dignity maybe, to this pulp extravaganza, a performance not just for completists.

Colette
Great chemistry between Keira Knightley as Colette and Dominic West as her philandering, charismatic scoundrel of a husband lends to a liveliness rarely found in costume biopics. Interesting that Colette liberates herself (early 20th century) and reaps the rewards, in relation to the curious self-effacement (late 20th century) of Glenn Close in The Wife, both facing similar situations (hubby unfairly gets the literary credit), and playing in adjoining theaters at my multiplex.

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Mr Sheldrake
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Re: The Films of 2018

#78 Post by Mr Sheldrake » Wed Oct 17, 2018 8:04 am

^ Once Willi (Dominic West) exits, the movie loses its steam. I fear West will be overlooked at awards time as this is viewed as a signature role (properly so) for Keira Knightley, just a notch below her Elizabeth Bennett and (for those of us besotted) Anna Karenina.

^^ The only novel I've read by Colette is Cheri which somewhat perplexed me. Can you recommend another, mr sausage, that you think illustrates her genius?

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Mr Sheldrake
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Re: The Films of 2018

#79 Post by Mr Sheldrake » Wed Oct 17, 2018 12:56 pm

Thanks for the extensive write-up, mr sausage. The Pure and the Impure has a nyrb edition, on order, and I'll also try the first Claudine, my library has all of those.

Searching
I would never have believed the central conceit of this after the first ten minutes could be sustained. A single dad's teenage daughter disappears and he must discover who she is (they aren't close) and what has happened to her, all through google search. We see Dad, we see what he sees on his computer.

John Cho is excellent in presenting the iconic image of contemporary life- that of a human being intensely absorbed in staring at a digital screen. The clues pile up, I became surprisingly riveted, as Dad morphs into a cyberspace Sherlock Holmes.

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Mr Sheldrake
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Re: The Films of 2018

#80 Post by Mr Sheldrake » Wed Oct 24, 2018 4:59 pm

The Happy Prince
Rupert Everett has designed a dirge, replete with dark cinematography, and scene after scene of Oscar Wilde at his most pathetic. He covers his final two years, after his release from prison with only brief glimpses of what he once was. The movie could have used more than glimpses to yield some perspective to his fall, and relieve the relentless gloom. It's a dream project for Everett and one can sense the depth with which he identifies, but only Colin Morgan as Bosie contributes necessary energy to the piece, despite some admirable actors on the fringes.

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domino harvey
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Re: The Films of 2018

#81 Post by domino harvey » Fri Oct 26, 2018 2:43 am

One look at our Dynamic Top Tens thread shows this is a year when music videos have threatened features for our affections, and now I get to play after stumbling upon the video for Lele Pons’ “Celoso.” I probably watched this a half dozen times in a row on YouTube after I first saw it, and then I downloaded the video so I could watch it another million times in a row on my TV. Like any great musical number from a film, a catchy song only helps invite repeat viewings, and Pons has that covered. From what I gather, Pons is best known for being a YouTube vlogger, but obviously the savvy needed to attract and maintain an audience has carried over into commissioning a smart video to accompany her song, as this vid has already amassed a staggering 120 million-plus views in only two months. And it’s obvious why, as it is in its fashion a perfect three minutes and thirty seconds and presents as good a musical number as I’ve ever seen.

Director Rudy Mancuso, who also edited the video, wisely ignores the actual narrative of a song that as far as I can tell from the translation is just about dancing with some dude when you’re out with your boyfriend, and instead gives us several years of career ascension in the service industry visually coded and relayed via one fast-moving and rhythmic take (though despite some well-done seams there are at least five separate shots by my count). We watch Pons go from one color coded environ to another, using the same small space of a restaurant and transforming it with each passing job title and color shift into a new representation of the same basic space. The effect is simple, elegant, and impressive in its confidence and skill.

The video begs the question that surely many of us who care about the Hollywood musical tradition of the studio era are always asking: Why are clearly talented minds stuck creating such vibrant expressions of visual wit and intelligent usage of Freed Unit-level approaches only in miniature? I don’t know anything about Rudy Mancuso apart from gathering that he’s also a YouTuber. But based on what he does with very little money here, give this guy $5 million to make a feature length musical and I wouldn’t be surprised if he gave us back a masterpiece. Why do full length feature musicals never look like this anymore unless they're directed by Damien Chazelle and called La La Land? Unlike that film, though, this video shows exactly how to use the techniques and approaches of the studio era musicals and update them for modern audiences. Wouldn’t/shouldn’t some producer somewhere see the popularity of this video and take a chance? Well, I don’t have the checkbook to make it happen, but I can at least point out that this is easily one of my favorite films of the year so far.

hanshotfirst1138
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The Films of 2018

#82 Post by hanshotfirst1138 » Fri Nov 09, 2018 6:22 pm

flyonthewall2983 wrote:I really liked Predator 2 watching it again recently, putting a monster-movie spin on the kind of action-crime stuff Joel Silver had made his stock and trade up to that point.
I don’t think Predator 2 is a very good film (Hopkins has none of McTiernan’s sense or suspense, style, or craft), but I don’t think it get enough credit for doing something new. It’s not “more monsters in the jungle,” it actually gives things a new setting.

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flyonthewall2983
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Re: The Films of 2018

#83 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Sat Nov 10, 2018 5:42 pm

Upon reflection there are a few major fails that belies my original statement for sure. The third act stumbles a bit, and some of the over-acting is grating (though not from Gary Busey, who's woefully underused). The one major improvement over the original is Alan Silvestri's music, between the two you can tell he had a way bigger budget for the sequel.

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domino harvey
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Re: The Films of 2018

#84 Post by domino harvey » Thu Nov 15, 2018 1:17 pm

I don't know that there's ever been a movie I want to see less than Instant Family. Can trailers and commercials for this collectively count as the worst film of the year?

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Brian C
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Re: The Films of 2018

#85 Post by Brian C » Thu Nov 15, 2018 7:20 pm

Yeah it looks ghastly for sure. Rose Byrne is someone that I find people tend to like, but her appeal escapes me almost entirely.

Plus, of course, everything else about it makes everyone involved look like terrible people.

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Big Ben
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Re: The Films of 2018

#86 Post by Big Ben » Thu Nov 15, 2018 7:33 pm

Persona wrote:
Sat Oct 13, 2018 3:18 am
Gareth Evans' Apostle is the kind of movie you could probably nit-pick to death but I was really drawn into the world created here, Dan Stevens was magnetic as the protagonist, and there's such an incredible verve to how they shot and edited this film (and the music and sound design were also fantastic). There's a very cool unfolding mystery thriller vibe to the first half of the movie or so and then towards the end it goes folk horror beast mode. Messy but dope.
Yeah this was a weird one. The trailer sells it as this really graphic horror film (Most of the violence is off screen but that trailer does not give this impression.) when it's more of a folk thriller in the vein of The Wicker Man. It's a rare form of something that's worth two hours of your time if you're down for something utterly off kilter and and in a subgenre that doesn't have many entries in it.

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