The BBFC vs. UK Independent Labels

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colinr0380
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 4:30 pm
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Re: The BBFC vs. UK Independent Labels

#301 Post by colinr0380 » Fri Jul 30, 2021 4:09 am

An interview with current BBFC executive David Austin to tie in with the release of video nasty-related horror film Censor.

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colinr0380
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Re: The BBFC vs. UK Independent Labels

#302 Post by colinr0380 » Wed Sep 15, 2021 3:50 pm

This isn't an 'independent label' but it is regarding the BBFC: apparently Warner Bros. release of the latest in the The Conjuring series, The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It has had a suicide scene cut out of the 15 rated DVD and Blu-ray versions but the scene remains in the uncut 18 rated UHD version of the film.

I remember something similar to this occurring back in the early 2000s at the dawn of DVD when the Brendan Fraser Mummy film was released in a cut version on VHS for its hanging scene but was made available in an uncut 15 rated version on DVD because at that time DVD was apparently considered as more of a 'collector's medium' with presumably a more limited audience. It is interesting to see UHD being apparently treated much the same way, at least in the early stages of the format.

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The Fanciful Norwegian
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Re: The BBFC vs. UK Independent Labels

#303 Post by The Fanciful Norwegian » Wed Sep 15, 2021 5:27 pm

Not the BBFC, but something like that also happened in the U.S.: Boden and Fleck's Sugar was released theatrically with an R rating, but for the DVD release they recut and resubmitted it for a PG-13, while the theatrical cut came out unrated on Blu.

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MichaelB
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Re: The BBFC vs. UK Independent Labels

#304 Post by MichaelB » Wed Sep 15, 2021 5:43 pm

I suspect it’s economically essential for the same UHD discs to be released in as many countries as possible, to achieve the maximum possible economies of scale. And if this means no longer going along with previous BBFC agreements and resubmitting, so be it.

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Thornycroft
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Re: The BBFC vs. UK Independent Labels

#305 Post by Thornycroft » Thu Sep 16, 2021 5:00 am

It wasn't uncommon in the past decade for films that suffered category cuts to their cinema releases to only be released uncut on Blu-Ray, with DVD consumers being stuck with the cut theatrical version. The practice seems to have carried through to UHD discs - John Wick 2 also suffered category cuts to suicide detail for a 15 certificate at the cinema, with that version appearing on DVD/Blu-Ray. Only the UHD has the 18-rated uncut version. Unfortunately this means the BBFC cuts have trickled through to other territories, with Australia and New Zealand home video releases matching those released in Britain.

The BBFC used to have a strict policy preventing different ratings of a work existing at the same time, but this appears to have been phased out sometime in the early-mid 2000s. There were only a few notable exceptions while the policy was still active, along with the DVD release of The Mummy metioned above by colinr0830 the BBFC allowed an uncut release of Terminator 2 on laserdisc back in 1992.

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MichaelB
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Re: The BBFC vs. UK Independent Labels

#306 Post by MichaelB » Thu Sep 16, 2021 5:04 am

Thornycroft wrote:
Thu Sep 16, 2021 5:00 am
The BBFC used to have a strict policy preventing different ratings of a work existing at the same time, but this appears to have been phased out sometime in the early-mid 2000s.
See my "economies of scale" point above. Prior to then, countries needed their own localised releases, as pre-DVD formats didn't allow for multiple languages, optional subtitles etc. But once those became feasible with DVDs, major studio rightsholders would try to cater for as many territories as possible via discs whose machine-readable side was identical, and so it was very much in their interest that that same version get passed by the BBFC.

And since the BBFC is 100% funded by the film industry in general and the mainstream film industry in particular, I daresay it wasn't hard to gently persuade them to change their policy. ("Nice classification board. Be a shame if someone were to break it, know what I mean?")

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