Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

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domino harvey
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Re: Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

#176 Post by domino harvey » Sun Oct 24, 2021 1:26 pm

I don’t think it was ever seen as particularly original, but it was popular with the burgeoning counterculture movement and that helped drive its omnipresence and success, at least initially

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Re: Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

#177 Post by Vincejansenist » Sun Oct 24, 2021 1:29 pm

To echo Propp I don’t think any story is original. It’s all about the how. I do think many of the signifiers within Dune have been aped since Herbert’s original, but I wish Villanueva had found an expression of those signifiers that were themselves novel and integrated according to his vision in this time.

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Re: Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

#178 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Sun Oct 24, 2021 6:10 pm

therewillbeblus wrote:
Sun Oct 24, 2021 12:13 pm
Other members who are better-versed in the history of science fiction literature may correct me, but I’m not sure if pointing out the story’s lack of originality is a fair point since the mid-60s source material ostensibly was quite original, enough so to inspire much of the other art that has come before this adaptation and likely diluted its effects for audiences going to experience the story for the first time. We shouldn’t view the ‘story’ in a vacuum as if it’s coming fresh in 2021!
Couldn’t agree more. I was more or less referring to the originality not in terms of literature but of cinema. Villeneuve is not one ever to make large leaps in making references to other movies, and is often clever with it. Stellan Skarsgard doing a straight-up Brando impersonation in spots, while not losing the plot at all, made me smile big time having been so blown away by Apocalypse Now again recently.
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And the way the fight at the end references the beginning of 2001: A Space Odyssey, trading the prehistoric beasts for humans thousands of years in the future is a humbling indictment of man’s violence to itself.
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Re: Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

#179 Post by Noiretirc » Sun Oct 24, 2021 7:05 pm

Black Hat wrote:
Sun Oct 10, 2021 4:14 am
Much, much louder. Hans Zimmer must be stopped. The films could not be more different.

Dune's script is non-existent which leaves the film, when not drowning you with dimly lit sand, needing to rely on the charisma of the lead. This, unless you're a diseased-brained TikToker obsessed with Chalamet, fails because he stumbles around like a half-wit just out the bathroom for the 6th time before midnight at a Fashion Week party. There are a couple of clunky lines that are so bad I'm pretty sure they were put in to be made into Gifs. There's weird dream sequences that I think are supposed to be sexual??? Just excruciating. The whole thing was like being tossed back and forth between an ad for BP & a condom commercial. Truly one of the dumbest movie-going experiences of my life. May God have mercy on us for the next few weeks (if not months) of people throwing around "world-building", "spectacle" and "visually stunning". It's the Havana Syndrome of movies.
I have not seen this yet, and I may end up significantly disagreeing with you, but I just want to say that I absolutely loved reading this review!

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Re: Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

#180 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Sun Oct 24, 2021 9:51 pm

The soundtrack album The Art And Soul of Dune, meant to accompany an art book of work featured from the film, is the closest Hans Zimmer has ever come to something like Brian Eno’s Thursday Afternoon or Music For Airports. The predominant atmospherics are so calming, even when it reaches more harsher tonalities. After watching the movie I listened to both the original soundtrack and this album (there is a third album out as well, and according to the NYT article on the soundtrack I read there’s a lot more that was left out, including songs that were to be sung by Josh Brolin’s character), essentially an exploration of it’s primary themes. The soundtrack itself is excellent, but this collection might be some of the most mind-blowing music he’s ever created.

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Re: Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

#181 Post by therewillbeblus » Sun Oct 24, 2021 10:52 pm

flyonthewall2983 wrote:
Sun Oct 24, 2021 6:10 pm
Stellan Skarsgard doing a straight-up Brando impersonation in spots, while not losing the plot at all, made me smile big time having been so blown away by Apocalypse Now again recently.
I thought this was pretty funny as well, especially since
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he's clearly channelling Brando's Kurtz, but Villeneuve also chooses to include a deliberate homage to Sheen's Willard emerging from the mud when Skarsgård rises from the pool to show the audience he's not dead.
He just can't help himself from referencing multiple characters within one from the same movie!

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Re: Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

#182 Post by black&huge » Mon Oct 25, 2021 3:34 am

after having watched this twice, liking it the first time, being even better the second time and reading the mixed reviews across the internet from forum to publication I have to say.... I don't know why people dislike it for the reasons they do?

The only two complaints I can even think of right now are predictable or cheap: Momoa's comic relief being out of place and him not able to unplug the cool bro demeanor and the fact that it is a pretty straightforward studio sci fi movie in terms of story progression/editing and the run of the mill "epic scope" epic where we cross cut between different vast settings and characters to cram tons of source material into a swallowable 2 1/2 hour runtime. Because those would also be my "complaints" but wasn't it obvious it would just be this way?

Speaking strictly from the point of view of not ever have read the source material I thought the movie was still pretty nuanced in laying out a mythology that was pretty interesting. The sound design is a key part of this and I actually feel this movie is largely based around a theme of communication not unlike Villeneuve's Arrival which everyone holds in high regard. I would agree that the dream/foreshadowing parts are not done very well at all and just slow things down but the fact that characters communicate in so many ways with not just each other but their surroundings (sign language and drawing the attention of the sandworms) was the underlying draw.

This is what I loved about it. I also loved that every character except Momoa was just super serious/all business. It seemed to fit this very well without bordering on a tiring try hard approach. Generally it just seems people didn't find this to be the thing they were expecting which in turn is being made out to seem like this is actually a stupid movie which treats it audience accordingly. I disagree and I also don't know if anyone actually knew what they were expecting.

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Re: Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

#183 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Mon Oct 25, 2021 10:04 am

I liked Jason Momoa in this. Coming into this story cold, I feel like his character serves as a function to make the idea of combat violence appealing and attractive to Paul.
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This is further propagated in my mind by that character’s exit from the film, which is the sort of classic death scene an epic like this needs to put across the tragedy of it all.
I think the only mistake regarding his character was shaving the beard, unless it has some relevance later on.

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Re: Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

#184 Post by Shanzam » Mon Oct 25, 2021 1:15 pm

The last quarter of the film seemed a bit off to me, in terms of dynamics/tempo. Or perhaps the motifs were repetitive, can't really tell yet. My partial dissatisfaction stems from there not being enough character exploration but there simply wasn't time for going in-depth. Sequels might solve that. And those sandworms seem atmospherically intriguing, hope there'll be more of them.

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Re: Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

#185 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Mon Oct 25, 2021 1:37 pm

therewillbeblus wrote:
Sun Oct 24, 2021 10:52 pm
flyonthewall2983 wrote:
Sun Oct 24, 2021 6:10 pm
Stellan Skarsgard doing a straight-up Brando impersonation in spots, while not losing the plot at all, made me smile big time having been so blown away by Apocalypse Now again recently.
I thought this was pretty funny as well, especially since
SpoilerShow
he's clearly channelling Brando's Kurtz, but Villeneuve also chooses to include a deliberate homage to Sheen's Willard emerging from the mud when Skarsgård rises from the pool to show the audience he's not dead.
He just can't help himself from referencing multiple characters within one from the same movie!
There’s a further irony here in my mind that Dave Bautista has the physique (and the acting chops to match, I’m guessing he’ll be more central to the plot of part 2 when it happens) much closer to what Col. Kurtz was probably as envisioned by Coppola and Milius as having.

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Re: Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

#186 Post by tehthomas » Mon Oct 25, 2021 7:47 pm

Boring but nice to look at.
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And not nearly enough Zendaya, who looked amazing in this.
Hans Zimmer's work is amazing here. It's a technical marvel from photography to costumes.


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Re: Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

#188 Post by therewillbeblus » Mon Oct 25, 2021 11:48 pm

black&huge wrote:
Mon Oct 25, 2021 3:34 am
after having watched this twice, liking it the first time, being even better the second time and reading the mixed reviews across the internet from forum to publication I have to say.... I don't know why people dislike it for the reasons they do?
I've been talking about this with friends who have also read the book, many of who liked the film, and it seems to be a trend amongst at least those I know that Villeneuve missed huge opportunities to let cinematically-written setpieces in the book breathe in the film. I used the example of the hunter-seeker in my original writeup, and the more I think about it, the angrier I become at the curtailing of momentum there. The way that entire scene is conveyed in the source is ripe for a director like Villeneuve (who demonstrated his ability to craft involving suspense in Sicario) to hone in on as an insulated nailbiter rather than a bridge between plot developments. Part of the reason I love that scene so much in the source is that watching/feeling Paul's raw exposure to his involvement in the stakes of the game for the first time, and using his own skills to bypass harm, develops his character. Villeneuve clearly doesn't care about character development here, but if he just slowed down for a second, he could give Chalamet space to build Paul simply through visual means as he becomes forcibly exposed to, and works through, danger. Instead, Paul is an empty vessel until later demonstrations, but by this point he's been onscreen forever and guarded from us, so it was hard to care when Villeneuve decided to invest in the stakes of the situations at hand.

The only people I know who haven't liked Villeneuve's Dune have read the source, so I'm curious if you're running into the same, in which case there's probably a reason you don't know why those people dislike it if you haven't read the book! I have yet to read anything overtly negative from people without prior knowledge of the material, but maybe I'm just not engaging too deeply into the internet these days

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Re: Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

#189 Post by jegharfangetmigenmyg » Tue Oct 26, 2021 5:42 am

I didn't like this film, but not for the reasons I would have thought before watching it. I really hated Villeneuve's Blade Runner which I found mind numbingly boring and meandering to the extreme. The best that can be said for Dune, instead, for me, is that it's not boring at all which has to do with the haphazard, almost avantgarde editing, which paradoxically was also why I couldn't at all get into the movie on a general level. I couldn't care less for any of the characters, and it seems to me the screenwriters just tried to write up a cross between Lord of the Rings and Star Wars, dumbing down the novel until it was just a simple good vs. evil-story. Of course to make it more digestable to the mainstream. The production design is of course spectacular, and amazing to look at, but that's about it for me. I almost felt like I was watching a doomsday documentary, just with the Attenborough narration missing. So, bad, not boring film, which betrays almost every simple storytelling rule, and offers next to no character development. It seems like Villeneuve just complete forgot about directing his actors -- maybe just being in awe of his own set designs and constructions.

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Re: Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

#190 Post by Roscoe » Tue Oct 26, 2021 9:12 am

therewillbeblus wrote:
Mon Oct 25, 2021 11:48 pm
Villeneuve clearly doesn't care about character development here, but if he just slowed down for a second, he could give Chalamet space to build Paul simply through visual means as he becomes forcibly exposed to, and works through, danger. Instead, Paul is an empty vessel until later demonstrations, but by this point he's been onscreen forever and guarded from us, so it was hard to care when Villeneuve decided to invest in the stakes of the situations at hand.

The only people I know who haven't liked Villeneuve's Dune have read the source, so I'm curious if you're running into the same, in which case there's probably a reason you don't know why those people dislike it if you haven't read the book! I have yet to read anything overtly negative from people without prior knowledge of the material, but maybe I'm just not engaging too deeply into the internet these days
I'd say there's an earlier scene of character development with Paul, during that little scene with the Reverend Mother, where his pain at having his hand in the box gradually morphs into something else -- he moves from pain, to mumbling that little Fear Litany, to levelling a look of pure defiant hatred at the R.Mother. It really caught me by surprise -- and yes, the whole hunter-seeker scene was a write-off.

On the whole, I liked the film more than I was expecting to. The film has a bad case of ChristopherNolanitis, aka Total Solemnity Syndrome, but it managed to keep me interested at least until Paul and Jessica's prolonged and prolonged and prolonged again escape brought things to a halt. And when Paul turns the thopter's controls off during that prolonged sandstorm I can't be the only person to have thought "Use the Force, Paul."

A lot of time seems to be spent on watching spaceships land (mimicking shots from 2001 and E.T. even) and take off. I found the plot easy enough to follow, the complaints that the film makes no sense and is confusing are themselves confusing and make no sense -- it is all laid out right there onscreen plotwise. There are details I can understand the uninitiated having issues with, like that mouse that appears a few times late in the film. My main question was why the Atreides seem to have had all of their space ships loaded into the bottom of lakes on Caladan. It made for a spectacular take-off, sure. But at the bottom of bodies of water?

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Re: Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

#191 Post by J Wilson » Tue Oct 26, 2021 11:29 am

The original series novels (not the trashy prequels/sequels by Herbert's son and Kevin Anderson) are among my favorite books (and I love Lynch's version as well), so I went into this curious to see how it was adapted. Much of the background material setting up the world was (understandably) very streamlined; where Lynch did a ton of the background stuff, there wasn't a whole lot here, and I could see that confusing less attentive viewers unfamiliar with the book. I won't go into specifics, because it just gets into listing everything I wanted to see that didn't get included, but I did feel Jessica was mishandled. For a character who is supposed to be trained to exhibit peak self-control, she too often looks scared or close to sobbing. In the book, it's no shock when she easily bests Stilgar in combat; we already know how dangerous she is. Likewise, Thufir Hawat isn't given much play either, though the white eyes when doing computations was inspired. There's a scene in the book where Thufir finds himself bested in the internal house politicking by Jessica that would also have been welcome to see, but it would again probably have required too many other moving parts also included to set up.

I saw the film in AMC's pseudo-IMAX, and I want to watch the film again on HBO Max to see if this is still the case, but several scenes had dialogue mixed so low that I often couldn't hear it over the music and/or sound. Overall though, I quite liked it; I would have preferred more dialogue from the book to be used, but this was still recognizably Dune to me.


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Re: Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

#193 Post by therewillbeblus » Tue Oct 26, 2021 2:20 pm

Well the whole clan Jessica is a part of, the shadow government run by the truth-sayers and the merits of "the voice" are all explained in brief lines of dialog when it's a core foundation of the plot in the book. Villeneuve has once again succeeded in tackling an ambitious high-budget project, so I understand how those unfamiliar with the source can see this and assess its merits on a sliding scale, but there is so much more investment to be mined for here that's just... cast aside for exposition, when this missing material would only emphasize and involve us in that exposition more intimately. Roscoe, your point about Paul's reactions to the Reverend Mother are well-taken, but even that scene played too quickly and didn't leave space for a proper debriefing of emotion afterwards to connect that visual character development to compassion for the situation, for the mysteries being learned and the overwhelming nature of it for Paul. It still just transitions into more information squeezed into a conversation before moving on yet again. I never thought the tone of the book was particularly emotional or involving, and yes, to an earlier point, the film is appropriately dour, but there's a pretty low bar that isn't even met in this film for how to engage us in the stakes of the characters. This is clearly a case where when you know that information is there for the taking it makes the omissions harder to stomach, so I suppose a case of ignorance is bliss, but now I feel like a fool for reading the book since I don't even like it and would have probably liked this just fine if I hadn't read it!

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Re: Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

#194 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Tue Oct 26, 2021 2:54 pm

Bring it on

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Re: Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

#195 Post by Roscoe » Tue Oct 26, 2021 3:03 pm

I guess it would be churlish to wonder why the Atreides keep all of their space freighters underwater on Caladan. It made for an impressive visual, sure, but.

And I remember no mention of Baron Harkonnen actually flying in Herbert's novel. As I recall, the character is so utterly immense that he has anti-gravity devices sewn into his clothing just so he can move around more easily. Lynch took it further and gave him flight, as does Villeneuve.

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Re: Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

#196 Post by John Cope » Tue Oct 26, 2021 6:30 pm

I wasn't going to write about this but, given my often acknowledged deep devotion to the Lynch film, it was perhaps inevitable. I should also add that I never read the book.

So I suppose all of that kind of automatically skews my perception some or makes it suspect but I think that acknowledgment is critical to get out of the way because how can it not affect things? Again, I don't just grudgingly like Lynch's Dune as some kind of guilty pleasure, I dearly love it and consider it finally to be my favorite of his films though I would never claim it's his best. Still what is so good about that one is what is so good about all of his work and distilled down to near perfect form in a way that has seeped into my very bones fundamentally as a kind of assessor of aesthetics. I do not want this to be some kind of referendum on Lynch vs. Villeneuve but to a certain extent, at least for me, avoiding that is simply going to be impossible.

I'll say to begin with then that the Villeneuve is very good in its own way. It really is a major accomplishment of art design especially and is genuinely monumental and impressive in that regard. And I can see why many of this film's biggest fans ardently claim that it must be seen on the biggest possible screen. I appreciate that and it "makes sense" but I can't help but always find that claim somewhat specious as it could be made for anything really and, as far as I'm concerned at least, if a film is utterly reliant upon that to communicate physical scale and spectacle above all else than it's likely that its persuasive power for me as a comprehensive work of cinematic art, popular or otherwise, is severely compromised from the start. Also, frankly, if I had seen this in the theater I can't help but think I would have been just that much more worn down by it, made tired, especially given Zimmer's characteristic endless drone score (I love drone but not pitched at air raid siren level and sustained for minutes on end). It's exhausting but not in a good way, more wearying than satisfying. This is a movie of moments, made up of moments and details that are on their own exquisite but overall it's a slog to get through; those exquisite moments and details are not ultimately compensatory enough. What I will add is that Villeneuve's best moments are always the ones that are the most singularly his own, the ones least in direct competition with the Lynch, the ones that are not replicas of scenes from the Lynch as in those cases the Lynch wins handily, hands down.

That sort of oppositional positioning is obviously unproductive but, again, inevitable as it points out the vast chasm of difference between the two in a way which really is instructive and detrimental to the Villeneuve and here I will provide some examples. The first one I noted was the early shield practice fight scene between Paul and Gurney. It's a perfectly fine scene in the Villeneuve, nothing anyone would find insufficiently realized on its own terms, but that's all it is, a bare minimum satisfaction of the scene's requirements, nothing special. It's respectably done and that's it. The Lynch is hyper-realized, aesthetically phantasmagoric, with the shields presented and expressionistically expressed as ever shifting cubist abstractions. How wonderfully vividly awesome and how genuinely alien in conception and this is one of the least alien elements in Lynch's aggressively alien film. Later, an even better example of divergent sensibilities. The interstellar trip in the Villeneuve could not be more prosaically depicted with the ships from Caladan collected into a transport carry-all in space and, evidently, transported rather directly to the planet Arrakis. The scene is shorn of everything that makes Lynch's depiction of the same scene remarkable. It's shorn of the reflections of the Atreides as they await the Guild Navigator to fold space and transport them to Arrakis. Rather more crucially it's shorn of the actual depiction of the Navigator's surrealist journey, a dreamlike and psychedelic expression of a mystical process. This huge difference plays into the different way in which the critical component of the spice is presented as well. Villeneuve's film makes brief reference to it as essential for interstellar travel but, if you didn't know otherwise, you might just think it was some kind of esoteric fuel. Lynch's film goes full bore on the esoteric which is no surprise but that is both appropriate in its emphasis on the alien and it is what distinguishes this from just any other generic sci-fi fantasy genre film. These scenes give evidence that here, where it really counts, Villeneuve just wants to play it safe and smooth all such potentially disruptive elements out but what this ultimately does is just make his version that much more mundane regardless of the epic scale and grandeur. There is a real timidity there. This contrast is also glimpsed to a lesser but still significant degree in scenes such as the Hunter-seeker attempted assassination and in the scene with Dr. Kynes; colorful but possibly risible elements are kept out (respectively "It would have killed meeeeee...." and mention of urine and feces being processed through the thigh pads of the desert stillsuits). The Lynch is all about the too muchness of it all and that's embarrassing for many even as it's integral to his vision. In Mark Kermode's recent review of the new film he argues that what stands out in the Lynch is ultimately a "distraction" and that the Villeneuve is more of a piece but I would say that all of what stands out in the Lynch film (which is just about everything) is exactly of a piece with itself, it's a different approach but one that nets far more for me than simply sticking to the story, especially in this case. And that is the nub of the problem.

The Villeneuve undoubtedly sticks to the story better but what it may come down to for me at least is the revelation that the story itself, with the expressive accoutrements pared down, just isn't all that compelling. Laid bare it is a rather standard hero's journey pop myth, at least here in this first part or first movie/book. That doesn't give its aspirations or even its implications enough due of course as this could more charitably be seen as a kind of archetypal ur-myth scenario from which much more expansive resonance could be and should be culled. But unfortunately I think that's a self-defeating claim (more on this in a minute). Contemporary analogies are clear here too, perhaps all too clear with its explicit gestures towards issues of colonialism (introduced immediately in a voice over in telling contrast to the more cosmologically oriented one that opens the Lynch pic) and even in its setting (there are times when it really does seem like they're attempting to evoke an environment like Afghanistan). That's okay I guess but a little reductively on the nose and far from inspiring. The Villeneuve clearly makes an effort to stick closer to Herbert's conception of the Messianic prophecy as well which is one that is far more skeptical of it than Lynch's film seems to be and would therefore seem to be, on that score at least, clearly better. But this too is slightly misleading I think. For one thing, regardless of whether it is closer to the text in that regard or not, I've never found that whole idea to be nearly as profound as many others do and therefore I can't claim that I care if Lynch defies it; it's not a bad idea of course and a much needed reminder in some ways but I simply wouldn't build up an entire series around it. Lynch's movie meanwhile treats the Big Battles as perfunctory and the entire Messianic prophecy as effectively beside the point, at best a means to an end, as his interests are concentrated almost fully upon the mystical element and the idea of receptivity toward it (as Martha Nochimson has pointed out Lynch's entire art is about acquiring control in order to lose it constructively and productively). I guess I just prefer (way prefer) what Lynch's film is getting at.

Still, if Villeneuve adheres to the agenda he seems to have laid out for himself than there's really no reason why this can't be a quite impressive and respectable series, especially if he continues to vault this all up with the same cinematic power he evidences here (as in the superb and powerfully dramatic flash forward to Jihad which Paul has and significantly does not in the Lynch). Villeneuve also excels at depicting more human moments such as Jessica's breakdown in the desert. I do think he is ultimately at odds with himself though. The more recognizable and relatable psychological realism which he attempts to ground all this in is not easily reconciled with the grand ceremonial spectacle. The intentional slightness of it often undercuts the other rather than complicates it as one has to presume was meant. There are moments when you really get a sense that that is what was meant with an insinuating psychologically realist undercurrent running beneath ostentatious formal splendor but it's simply not well realized enough and that tends to get suffocated beneath a pageantry which he really doesn't have a feel for or understanding of. I couldn't help but think throughout how much I would have liked to have seen Matthew Barney take this project on, though of course that was never going to happen in our reality but if it had it might have all been sung à la the awesome scene on the planet of the Sardaukar and that would have been cool with me.

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Re: Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

#197 Post by jegharfangetmigenmyg » Fri Oct 29, 2021 6:31 am

A bit off topic, but this is one of the better ones:
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Image

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Re: Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

#198 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Fri Oct 29, 2021 8:08 am

therewillbeblus wrote:
Sun Oct 24, 2021 10:52 pm
flyonthewall2983 wrote:
Sun Oct 24, 2021 6:10 pm
Stellan Skarsgard doing a straight-up Brando impersonation in spots, while not losing the plot at all, made me smile big time having been so blown away by Apocalypse Now again recently.
I thought this was pretty funny as well, especially since
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he's clearly channelling Brando's Kurtz, but Villeneuve also chooses to include a deliberate homage to Sheen's Willard emerging from the mud when Skarsgård rises from the pool to show the audience he's not dead.
He just can't help himself from referencing multiple characters within one from the same movie!
Now that I think about it there’s a scene where they clearly homage the first two Godfathers too.
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The Baron briefly resembles a cross between Kurtz and Vito Corleone when he meets the Duke before killing the doctor. Add to the fact that Oscar Isaac so closely resembles Al Pacino (I see it anyway), and that he is lying in that pose so close to Sonny in that wrenching scene in II where Michael cuts him off.

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Re: Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

#199 Post by therewillbeblus » Fri Oct 29, 2021 9:42 am

jegharfangetmigenmyg wrote:
Fri Oct 29, 2021 6:31 am
A bit off topic, but this is one of the better ones:
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Image
My favorite:
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Image
I also saw something online that said "Twin Peaks is just Friends for people who like Dune" and got a kick out of it

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Re: Dune (Denis Villeneuve, 2021)

#200 Post by Michael Kerpan » Fri Oct 29, 2021 10:36 am

My patience wore increasingly thin with each sequel (never got past Frank Herbert's own ones) -- and I finally quit mid-way through the 4th volume. I felt that most of the genuine inspiration got expended in the initial novel.

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