The Films of 2020

Discussions of specific films and franchises.
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ianthemovie
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Re: The Films of 2020

#76 Post by ianthemovie » Sat Oct 17, 2020 4:52 pm

I wonder if anyone else has seen Dean Kapsalis' The Swerve. Apparently it was made in 2018 but was only recently got a (streaming) release. It showed up on my radar because it has gotten a couple of rave reviews and so has something like a 90 on Metacritic. It sounds to be an intriguing and dark psychological thriller/horror movie. Can anyone speak to whether it's worth checking out?

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senseabove
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Re: The Films of 2020

#77 Post by senseabove » Wed Oct 21, 2020 3:19 pm

Apple has picked up Todd Haynes' Velvet Underground doc.

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MichaelB
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Re: The Films of 2020

#78 Post by MichaelB » Fri Oct 23, 2020 7:41 am

Aunt Peg wrote:
Mon Aug 10, 2020 6:46 am
I haven't seen Corpus Christi either. Did see a trailer at the cinema a couple of weeks ago but I've already got a Blu Ray on it's way to me.
I have now seen Corpus Christi, and the hype is amply justified: it's not just Jan Komasa's best film (and as far as I'm concerned he's yet to make a bad one, and I've seen all four features) but one of the most intelligent and absorbing dramas I've seen since Asghar Farhadi's A Separation - with which it shares a welcome fondness for complexity and nuance in its treatment of its major (and indeed minor) characters.

It reminded me in many ways of Paper Mask, a long-forgotten British film from 1990 in which a hospital porter managed, thanks to a series of coincidences, to get hired by another hospital as an actual doctor - although the crucial difference is that while Paper Mask focused exclusively on the deception and the suspense as to when he'll be unmasked (dramatically, a given) and was otherwise pretty thin gruel, Komasa and screenwriter Mateusz Pacewicz realise that while the core narrative structure of a parolee successfully pretending to be a priest (surprisingly, this has happened for real on more than one occasion) offers similar opportunities for constant suspense as to when he'll be exposed, they're much more interested in the real dramatic/psychological meat of this particular topic.

Which is to ask fundamental questions about what a priest is actually for, and whether a time-serving veteran who's dutifully ticked all the right boxes but is otherwise pretty much detached from his community except for the contractual minimum (Mass, confession, etc.) is intrinsically superior to someone whose track record as a petty criminal actively disqualifies him from the priesthood, but who would appear to have more natural talent in a single fingertip than his predecessor has in his entire body - and the entire community is visibly energised by his presence, not least because he actually starts doing what his predecessor only talked about, while grasping tricky diplomatic nettles that had been brushed under the carpet until his arrival.

I'd seen a couple of features with Bartosz Bielenia in supporting roles (he had a tiny part in Wojciech Smarzowski's scabrously score-settling Clergy, for instance), but nothing that signalled the power of his performance here - and Corpus Christi simply wouldn't work without a barnstormingly charismatic lead. And about halfway through I realised that the camera was barely moving aside from one tiny, almost imperceptible track into his face - when I give it a second viewing (and it's definitely "when", not "if"), I'll keep an eye out to see if the framing really is mostly static, because I suspect this may be a deliberate aesthetic choice on Komasa's part, as if to symbolise the rigidity of the system that the protagonist Daniel is fighting against.

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Persona
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Re: The Films of 2020

#79 Post by Persona » Sat Oct 31, 2020 8:45 pm

HIS HOUSE

Best horror movie since I'm not even sure.

Effective not just in its depiction of genre horror but societal horror and seamlessly communicates those two things in a dark, disturbing harmony rather than trying to graft one on the other.

Exceptional lead performances, cinematography, editing.

Great debut from Remi Weekes, who has immediately become a director I will follow closely from here on.

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Persona
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Re: The Films of 2020

#80 Post by Persona » Mon Nov 23, 2020 8:56 am

Mr Sheldrake wrote:
Wed Aug 26, 2020 7:19 am
The Assistant

The film is compelling in recording, at a contemplative documentary distance, the daily drudgery of an entry level assistant (to a Weinstein-ish movie mogul), and her increasing awareness that something is rotten. She’s surprisingly verbally challenged considering her position (she wants to be a producer) and even a bit dim in bringing her concerns about her bosses inappropriate sexual proclivities to HR with no real evidence, just supposition.

It does provides a lively scene with one of my favorite actors, Matthew Macfadyen, the HR chief who sets her straight on how to get ahead in the company, a chilling portrait of the enablers who shrug off what they know is wrong with a cynical chuckle.
.
I have to say, I really liked this film.

The film's restraint and very pure observational stance is part of why it works so well, but maybe could have used a touch more impact in a few scenes outside of the HR scene. I think the end in particular is a case where the film has a few moments but can't seem to hit on the arc it wants, or figure out if it even wants an arc.

The other creative choice, too, that seems to have been a tough one was how long the assistant has been working for the company. They make it a very brief period of time (5 weeks) yet it seems like she knows her job all too well and is fairly jaded to the experience, it's just when this new assistant comes to work right there in the office with them that she feels the need to do something. So I saw it as a kind of "straw that broke the camel's back" when she goes to the HR guy because I thought there would be this mountain of instances she would be carrying with her, but instead it was just everything we had already seen. But then again, the way the assistant is portrayed, you don't really believe that a person of her character would have been able to put up with this situation for more than a few months, nor should she have or kept quiet for long... so yeah, it's a tricky spot they had there in terms of the background and context to the narrative. Obviously this is a hybrid story based on the true stories of many assistants and women, so you have to be sensitive to the fact that this might closely reflect the reality of a few of those stories.

But Garner is great at portraying the soul-suck of this job and, again, I loved the methodical approach and how lived-in the film felt, which makes its quiet indictments that much more affecting even if it's stuck in a corner then where the main character can't have much agency. Which I suppose, too, is part of the point since she is "just" The Assistant.

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willoneill
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Re: The Films of 2020

#81 Post by willoneill » Thu Dec 03, 2020 2:56 pm

Possessor (Dir. Brandon Cronenberg)

Honestly, if I were David Cronenberg's son, I don't think I'd have the courage to make a body horror film, but good on you Brandon. Possessor (or, uh, Possessor Uncut ... is that the official title or just an indication that in Canada, the film is uncut?) has great visuals and sound design, and an intriguing premise, but doesn't really say much. There's very context for how the film's fictional "service" is supposed to work properly, which makes it hard to understand what's malfunctioning. You get bits and pieces, but not enough to care about the protagonist. I also didn't pick up the motivation (or even who's paying) for the central job of the plot, but maybe I just missed that detail. But, back to the visuals, a lot of the work was done practically and it looks quite striking. It definitely stayed with me in my long, cold walk home from the theatre late last night. Both that, and the sound design, reminded me almost of Beyond the Black Rainbow, in a way.

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colinr0380
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Re: The Films of 2020

#82 Post by colinr0380 » Thu Dec 03, 2020 6:23 pm

It does look very interesting from its trailer. It also got a review on the BBC's Front Row arts radio series last week where the apparently 'extreme and unnecessary violence' grossed out two of the three reviewers too much, so that probably means that it is doing its job! It apparently has the Andrea Riseborough character as a hitperson able to carry out perfect contract killings by 'possessing' the bodies of people close to them who might avoid suspicion and murdering them that way, with the latest job seemingly going a bit wrong. The main film critic brought in for the Front Row segment, Larushka Ivan-Zadeh, (the only member to unreservedly like it) mentioned that its 'like Avatar or Inception in premise but emphasises the bodily violence of entering into another person as compared to the slickness of those films'. Maybe its going to be a kind of commentary on the acting profession too, as it does look as if it is going to be getting into ideas of what inhabiting different races, sexes, nationalities etc and having to convincingly play a part can end up doing to the psyche of the person inhabiting that role, even if only for a brief period before discarding the role permanently and moving on to the next one.

I had not realised that Sean Bean was in the film as the next target for assassination who is apparently provoking a crisis of conscience until watching that trailer, which I presume is meant to be a wry joke about how easy his characters are to kill in every other film! And it was already getting clear after Oblivion, Mandy and The Grudge but Riseborough is really tackling some interesting roles at the moment, especially in sci-fi and horror.

(But all of this mostly reminds me that I really need to dig out and watch Antiviral at some point)

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Re: The Films of 2020

#83 Post by therewillbeblus » Sat Dec 12, 2020 7:19 pm

Cold Meridien: Peter Strickland's latest is a short 7-minute experimental film (available on MUBI and backchannels). Like most avant-garde films, it's hard to figure out what to make of it all- though it's definitely provocative in its presentation of voyeurism as a numbed paradox of engagement and displacement with/from content, as we watch pleasurable and horrific images spliced with pleasant ASMR and ominously jarring sound designs, making this a cocktail of contrasting vibes using the medium's many tools to reinforce that point.

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TheKieslowskiHaze
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Re: The Films of 2020

#84 Post by TheKieslowskiHaze » Sat Dec 12, 2020 11:02 pm

Minari (Dir. Lee Isaac Ching)

I got to see this with Lincoln Center's virtual cinema.

There are a few moments that come close to crossing the line into sentimentality, but, in my view, it never does. It's genuinely lovely. A tension--due to race, American religious fundamentalism, and/or capitalism--undergirds the whole thing, but so does a genuine appreciation for the beauty of family and the American landscape. Shades of Malick and Steinbeck. I was legitimately moved. Also, the music is great, punctuating scenes without taking over, heightening the sublimity of it all. I recommend this movie pretty strongly.

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therewillbeblus
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Re: The Films of 2020

#85 Post by therewillbeblus » Sat Dec 19, 2020 2:49 am

therewillbeblus wrote:
Wed Jun 03, 2020 3:11 pm
Thomas Vinterberg's Druk sounds fascinating (an opinion which will surprise no one if you look it up). It could easily be deeply offensive and problematic for me, but if pulled off right the possibilities are endless. Hopefully it's as bold as it sounds (and with Vinterberg at the helm, I'm optimistic).
I didn’t like Druk (Another Round) as much as I hoped, but it’s an insightful anthropological view on the western ironic need for numbness to feel joy, for inebriation to fuel identity, to feel highs to bring one back to youth and romance once stuck in a plateaued existence. Vinterberg is not afraid to recognize the positive aspects of drinking, an invaluable disinhibition which grants doses of transient serenity, reprieve from boredom and apathy. He’s also not afraid to twist the knife in the realization that there is no cure to the disease of maturity, as alcoholism becomes an allegory for the consequences of trying to have your cake and eat it too in life. The narrative moves like adult development, igniting a light comedy that slips into a tragedy when trying to keep up with the same tempo, and whether or not Vinterberg and Lindholm think we can renew the cycle so easily is for viewers to find out.

In a straightforward manner, the film follows the self-medication hypothesis of addiction where one drinks to cope with dysphoria rather than to achieve euphoria- and yet it sneakily dares to show the colorful soup of the ride rather than an alcoholic’s hindsight reflection in black and white terms. In an even bolder way, this film demands that we acknowledge that “moderation” is not a word in our vocabulary, and that there is no such thing as a static comfort zone. The word “more” is always the answer to discomfort, reflecting our inability to accept our current state, moving the goal post to account for our sensitivity to staying in place- because that would mean a comfort with ourselves as we are. Here, the notion of ‘tolerance’ in needing to drink more to get the same effect takes on ripples of meaning for unmanageability in our lives, stemming from a refusal to tolerate our lives without a tangible variable to chase for a cure.

This film speaks an unsettling truth about western male identity that few films manage to, all tied up in a neat formulaic dramedy with about the level of didacticism one might expect, though outside of the obvious content we can read between the lines as his exciting lectures quickly transform into talks around his obsessive activity for selfish reinforcement, and this says something even more alarming about nationalism’s connection to celebrated alcohol consumption. Holding these truths that Mikkelsen may be initially sharper, more fun, and more self-assured, that lowering inhibitions a bit is the best way to access life’s opportunities our anxieties and self-consciousnesses are blind to… right along with the sadness dependent on an external elixir to make him feel stable, and the fact that we cannot take a magical supplement to sustain this persona, makes for a tough cocktail to swallow. If this isn’t a healthy solution, it begs the question: Is there one? Not on our terms. We spend our lives chasing what we need to be 'present' to find.

The film is a bit bloated, a bit too on-the-nose, but it's also a strikingly apt picture of how alcoholism is woven into western culture, and even moreso, "alcoholic thinking" into the psychology of the western folks who don't even drink. Perhaps the most sobering thesis of this film is the notion of 'do-overs', the tragic awareness of our locus of control, and how reality fails to intervene with our wills- or, as a character states late in the film (in a well-placed and perverse example of positive drinking, right before the endpoint of a dire one), how we must come to terms with our own failures to intervene on reality's terms. The film reaches a spiritual place amidst a finale planted in the cultural landscape of a seemingly sleazy scene, a reminder that celebrations can be both repelling and enlightening, and Vinterberg reverts back to the blurry concentrate that makes up most of life after showing polarized extremes. To this extent, the subtle thematic reveal implicates the film's meaty drama as anti-didacticism.

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Re: The Films of 2020

#86 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Mon Dec 28, 2020 6:16 am

The Midnight Sky had real potential to be interesting but George Clooney finally made me a believer about his deficiencies as a director. I speak for myself here but I doubt few would disagree that he's possibly one of the most agreeable movie stars of the last 3 decades. This is the first time where I felt kind of tricked by that, because he is the most interesting thing happening on screen against an incredibly overdone story, with what is an interminable pace at 118 minutes. Even though it's an overdone cliche itself now (RIP David Giler, who invented it) I was really thinking/hoping one of the characters on the spaceship turned out to be a robot/AI, just for the sake of making it feel a little more sci-fi than melodrama. Then it turns out no he's human, with another half-hearted backstory in a movie already chalk full of them. This is to speak nothing of the silly twist at the end that further made me feel stupid for dedicating two hours of my life to it.

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senseabove
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Re: The Films of 2020

#87 Post by senseabove » Mon Dec 28, 2020 3:25 pm

I haven't seen it yet, but Bloody Nose, Empty Pockets is currently $1 to rent on Amazon, which means it's free if you've opted for No Rush shipping anytime recently...

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therewillbeblus
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Re: The Films of 2020

#88 Post by therewillbeblus » Mon Dec 28, 2020 3:39 pm

senseabove wrote:
Mon Dec 28, 2020 3:25 pm
I haven't seen it yet, but Bloody Nose, Empty Pockets is currently $1 to rent on Amazon, which means it's free if you've opted for No Rush shipping anytime recently...
Ty Burr gave it some high praise and his Top Ten writeup made it sound interesting (blend of documentary and fiction, supposedly taking place in Vegas but shot in New Orleans, I think?) but I'm wary about the experience of watching drunk people for a full feature. Thanks for the head's up though, I've heard "humanism" thrown at the film in several places so it could be the empathy-for-drunks movie that America needs to combat the stigma. Or it could just make it worse.

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Re: The Films of 2020

#89 Post by domino harvey » Mon Dec 28, 2020 7:39 pm

Discussion of George Clooney as a director moved here

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Pavel
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Re: The Films of 2020

#90 Post by Pavel » Sat Jan 02, 2021 7:10 pm

therewillbeblus wrote:
Sat Jan 02, 2021 6:31 pm
Never Rarely Sometimes Always: The task of capturing youthful experience with authenticity is a challenge too few indie filmmakers can manage without an ironically grandiose-by-way-of-detaching pretentiousness or resisting the urge to insert artificial melodrama into the mix, which forces an uneven contrast of tones (as was my experience watching Nomadland). Eliza Hittman's effort here is terrific though, with nouvelle vague shots on the streets of New York, and meditations on the struggles of youth isolated within systems without transforming the themes into macro ethical statements. I hated Beach Rats, which seemed to exude all the face-slapping theatrics listed above, but this film is humble in its restraint, acknowledging that behavioral observations shot with modesty say more than words and stylistic intrusions ever could. The bond between the two girls is genuine, the drama is more intense because of the lack of verbal reveals about stakes and compromise. The single-take titular scene is one of the most incredible, raw, and honest moments in any film I've seen, not only because of the abstentions, but because the woman asking the questions is refusing to change her affect, behaving like a real provider would, where compassion is transmitted in quiet caring gestures, not in overblown responses. This is also a case where the gamble of casting is critical, and the film wouldn't work without Sidney Flanigan, who expresses so much without ever overstating anything, even in body language.
I still haven't seen Never Rarely (I was mixed on It Felt Like Love), but speaking of films that capture youthful experience with authenticity, I just finished Shithouse and quite liked it. It never ridicules its main character's homesickness, his attachment to his family, his penchant for crying at slight provocations, the fact that he talks with his stuffed animal. It refuses easy punchlines and all of the character's idiosyncrasies, most of which wouldn't generally be considered very "masculine", are portrayed in a very matter-of-fact way, and despite that the movie is still frequently very funny. Even the film's comic relief character, a supposed college archetype (I wouldn't know), is portrayed as a living person, a nice guy with a very dude-bro mentality. The film seemingly takes a relatively conventional turn at a certain point when Alex becomes romantically involved with a girl, but what follows sort of imagines a what-now, day-after scenario of the Before Midnight-type insta-romance, with both characters reacting in a deeply flawed, but richly human way. The ending does take a moderately disappointing crowd-pleaser turn (when it comes to the romance part of the film), but it also illustrates the part of the film that resonated with me the most, namely how college (or high school or any community) is often challenging, but when one finds a group to share the experience with immensely rewarding.

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Re: The Films of 2020

#91 Post by TheKieslowskiHaze » Sun Jan 03, 2021 11:59 pm

therewillbeblus wrote:
Sat Dec 12, 2020 10:05 pm
I was worried that Lovers Rock would be similarly vapid, but at around the halfway mark I found myself utterly consumed by the atmosphere put forth. The camera drifting around the room of dancing, peering in at various characters coming in and out of the narrative and then returning to the groove, that its rhythm devolves into the hypnotic daze of culture mirroring as the marijuana smoke physically populating the space.
I had a similar experience watching Mangrove. I was a little worried at first, seeing some nascent cliches and one-dimensionality. But McQueen's bits of visual poetry find their way in, and the writing and acting really shine in the second half. It ends up being legitimately powerful without seeming overwrought.

I haven't seen any of the other movies in the series, but I'm thinking Lovers Rock next.

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The Curious Sofa
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Re: The Films of 2020

#92 Post by The Curious Sofa » Thu Jan 07, 2021 2:49 pm

The film which gave me the most joy in 2020 was Spontaneous, a teen high school comedy about students randomly and inexplicably exploding, leaving only blood and viscera behind.

Spontaneous starts as your typical high school movie, with our heroine Mara your standard sarcastic cool girl, breaking the fourth wall every so often. So far, so familiar.

One day a student in her class suddenly explodes without evidence of an incendiary device. Mara doesn't let this bizarre tragedy get to her and the film promises to be an amusing, if slightly glib black teen comedy. Then more students keep exploding, in the middle of the ensuing chaos Mara starts falling for a boy and from there the film started to take me by surprise.

I'm not the demographic for teen romantic comedies and a recommendation of a film being "heartwarming" usually makes me run a mile but Katherine Langford and Charlie Plummer are so appealing and in tune with each other and their dialogue so funny, I came to really root for them. The snappy dialogue and splatter premise make the film schmalz-proof and Spontaneous becomes an genuinely affecting film about first love, as it ventures to increasingly dark places. More students keep exploding, scientists and law enforcement can't figure out why and the situation becomes desperate. Still, the splattery sight of students bursting like viscera filled balloons never loses the edge of a sick joke.

One thing I appreciated was that Spontaneous side steps the usual cliches of the high school movie. There are no villains, everybody tries to be a good person. There are no mean girls, the jocks may be a little dim but they are genuinely sweet and the adults (parents, teachers, law enforcement) are decent people with a sense of humour, who understand and care for the kids.

I needed a film about the potential of good in people and didn't expect to find it in a gory, splatter comedy. Spontaneous is a film about the unpredictable randomness of life and how to make sense of the world despite of that. Its central metaphor may be on the nose but it works and it also happens to be a great film for this pandemic.

Don't let the poster for this turn you off, it's terrible.

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Re: The Films of 2020

#93 Post by therewillbeblus » Thu Jan 07, 2021 10:41 pm

Pieces of a Woman

I’ve read some criticisms of this film claiming that it’s too heavy-handed, but (at least for the majority of the film) I don’t know how else you authentically capture this kind of devastating narrative than the way Kornél Mundruczó does. I didn’t find it exploitative to the processes of trauma, but relentlessly precise, allowing us to become fully immersed in an overwhelming experience with full knotted-stomachs, and knowing full well that if this is how we feel so far removed from the situation, we can’t imagine the experience of actually going through it. The long takes in the first pre-credits act examine the process of being in labor with a rare fearlessness, as a suspenseful nightmare of pain and confusion. The entire picture is a thriller of domestic crises, where Kirby and LaBeouf (who, for obvious current-event human-cancelation reasons, will unfortunately be unfairly ignored from the bulk of praise being thrown at the performances), are so good they almost singlehandedly stop this film from devolving into manipulative tragedy-porn. However, Mundruczó’s willingness- hell, demand- to remain transfixed on the emotion without cutting from the unbearable discomfort, yet somehow still taking a (predominantly) humble stance that allows the actors to do the real work, is a challenging balancing act of restraint and involved commitment, pulled off with commendable composure. I’m sure plenty of people will find aspects to criticize here, and there are some easy targets
SpoilerShow
yes, there are expositional shots of dead plants and a disconnected bridge that are as on-the-nose as metaphors come, but I found moments like Benny Safdie finding a common proverb “time heals all wounds” as somehow profound- as if he had never heard it before- to be emblematic of the stupid things people say when you’re grieving and the hypervigilence of Kirby’s subjectivity in noticing them. I get how objectively it seems like a lame insert, but having been to my fair share of funerals, I’ve heard plenty worse.

Ellen Burnstyn’s (annoyingly uninterrupted) speech is a much much tho, as is the final act stuff in the courtroom, which really undid a lot of the modesty exhibited throughout the earlier part of the film. I didn't buy Kirby's self-actualization in the way it was presented to us, but I did believe that, based on the complex trauma symptoms we had seen thus far, she would forgive the midwife, and not take into account appropriateness of context on where and when to express that stage of grief.
However, if you can look past some of these details, it’s worth seeing on the merits of the opening birth scene alone, let alone these two actors' unflinching perfs. If there’s justice come awards season, Kirby will take home the gold statue.

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Re: The Films of 2020

#94 Post by therewillbeblus » Fri Jan 08, 2021 11:02 pm

Mr Sheldrake wrote:
Fri Feb 28, 2020 6:26 pm
The Invisible Man

An effective Elizabeth Moss vehicle, she delivers emphatically as a terrorized woman in peril, escaping the clutches of spousal abuse, and then struggling with the invisible force of its memory. The film is at its best in the early slow building tension, Whannell teasing the audience with potential scares and then pulling back.

Once the battle erupts full scale, he gets a bit carried away with the gruesomeness, too much collateral damage. It overwhelms the abuse metaphor while upping the ante on the scares. I nearly jumped out of my seat a couple of times. Moss is superb here in her resilience. There’s a vast modernist mansion used as a setting that is as eerie as the proverbial haunted house of old, Whannell demonstrating how to dramatize interior space. A terrific looking film considering an 8 million dollar budget.
I thought this was as theoretically creative as the buzz suggested: spinning the attention away from the manipulative toxic male as even a co-protagonist and reducing him to the shadows to make his victim solely worthy of surrogate alignment and empathic validation. The first half is a nice slow-burn, though I didn't expect it to go full-Gaslight using the strategy of relational aggression via indirect emotional abuse as the primary method of violence. As Sheldrake points out, this can only last for so long, and although I suppose it needs to get wilder, I wish Whannell found a path to raise the stakes while remaining in that grounded discomfort of brutal manipulation for the duration. Whannell does his best to keep this as the key weapon even between bits of violence, though a third-act narrative decision seems to exist solely to add another half hour to this film, feed into expected wish-fulfillment (why jump the shark now?), and comes off as cheap and unearned.
SpoilerShow
The choice of showing us the villain, and allowing him to flaunt his sociopathic behaviors in the flesh, is aimed at granting us catharsis; yet this undermines the film's central conceit in the process, personifying what was best left to our imagination as a stand-in for the person such feelings elicit in each audience member. Making him specific spoils the metaphor of a woman disempowered by ubiquitous -invisible yet debilitating- patriarchal energy as well, and I couldn't help but roll my eyes at how Moss uses his own tools to best him in the end, something that's a) metaphorically reinforcing a problematic lens that women are able to use patriarchal platforms to actualize their equality, and thus, b) out of step with any encouragement of women relying on their own strengths for empowerment (or is the strength in exposing male weakness?) I suppose I can get on board with the reading that this is showing how, on an even field, women are more cunning than men, and that by showing us this guy as a pathetic individual powerless beyond his suit invalidates his power over Moss... but then why did he have power over her for so long? Because she let him have that narrative? I don't know, it all feels a bit disingenuous when picked apart, even if I understand why they felt this was necessary to shift power drastically for the viewer's satisfaction.
Before this unfortunate extra chapter, the consistent deliberate pace and gradual, patient camerawork induces tension just a few notches below the norm, enough to stand out without detaching the viewer. I was reminded of David Sandberg's shorts during the best moments here, and even if it runs a bit long with frustrating developments, overall I remained impressed with the commitment of dragging this out until all the traumas of domestic abuse were excoriated.

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Re: The Films of 2020

#95 Post by DarkImbecile » Mon Jan 11, 2021 11:57 am


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Re: The Films of 2020

#96 Post by knives » Mon Jan 11, 2021 1:13 pm

I was worried we wouldn’t get one this year.

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Re: The Films of 2020

#97 Post by DarkImbecile » Mon Jan 11, 2021 3:02 pm


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Pavel
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Re: The Films of 2020

#98 Post by Pavel » Mon Jan 11, 2021 5:06 pm

He's raised well over $7,000 in a few hours, so it seems pretty certain we'll be getting one for 2021.

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Re: The Films of 2020

#99 Post by therewillbeblus » Mon Jan 11, 2021 5:17 pm

I laughed when the raft in First Cow was edited moving back and forth to Sabotage's DJ scratching

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Re: The Films of 2020

#100 Post by colinr0380 » Wed Jan 13, 2021 4:33 am

therewillbeblus wrote:
Mon Jan 11, 2021 5:17 pm
I laughed when the raft in First Cow was edited moving back and forth to Sabotage's DJ scratching
I did as well, and thought it may have been a nice allusion to the moment in Tenet where the same thing briefly happens to the imagery!

Is it just me or were a lot of Ehrlich's top films very orally fixated in nature? Lots of gaping mouths and swallowing things going on over the last year, it appears! Also it is interesting to note that the director of Minari is about to direct the live action remake of Your Name as their next project.

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