Peter Bogdanovich

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jazzo
Joined: Sun Nov 17, 2013 12:02 am

Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#176 Post by jazzo » Thu Apr 16, 2020 1:26 pm

Thanks for the very considered responses, guys. If I hadn't rewatched it a couple of days ago, I would definitely sit down with it again, and try to view through your more positive lenses. I love having my mind changed about films. Still fresh, though, so perhaps in a year or two.

I love NOISES OFF.

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domino harvey
Dot Com Dom
Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:42 pm

Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#177 Post by domino harvey » Thu Apr 16, 2020 1:40 pm

beamish14 wrote:
Thu Apr 16, 2020 1:15 pm
I'm of the opinion that Noises Off! and The Thing Called Love is one of the strongest double-punches from a major
director in the last 30 years.
Well, and I’d say they are Bogdanovich’s two worst films! So, I think jazzo ends up somewhere between our extremes...

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jazzo
Joined: Sun Nov 17, 2013 12:02 am

Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#178 Post by jazzo » Thu Apr 16, 2020 1:44 pm

Story of my fucking life...

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therewillbeblus
Joined: Tue Dec 22, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#179 Post by therewillbeblus » Thu Apr 16, 2020 1:49 pm

And I can’t stand Noises Off! for the most part- so all extreme opinions accounted for

beamish14
Joined: Fri May 18, 2018 3:07 pm

Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#180 Post by beamish14 » Thu Apr 16, 2020 1:56 pm

therewillbeblus wrote:
Thu Apr 16, 2020 1:49 pm
And I can’t stand Noises Off! for the most part- so all extreme opinions accounted for
Ha! Well, for me, it's always been a "comfort food" film. I can just turn it on at any point and derive extreme pleasure from it.
David Mamet's State and Main also falls into this category, which might be odd for some, considering that it deals heavily with
statutory rape in the entertainment industry.

I like the first 40ish minutes of Illegally Yours, too, but that one peters out quickly afterwards.

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therewillbeblus
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Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#181 Post by therewillbeblus » Thu Apr 16, 2020 2:03 pm

State and Main is excellent, no objections there

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jazzo
Joined: Sun Nov 17, 2013 12:02 am

Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#182 Post by jazzo » Thu Apr 16, 2020 2:08 pm

Jesus, are we all in agreement about State and Main? Domino?

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therewillbeblus
Joined: Tue Dec 22, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#183 Post by therewillbeblus » Thu Apr 16, 2020 2:12 pm

Mamet brings people together

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domino harvey
Dot Com Dom
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Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#184 Post by domino harvey » Thu Apr 16, 2020 3:40 pm

State and Main is wonderful. “It’s not a lie. It’s a gift for fiction” is a Top 5 Mamet quote

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jazzo
Joined: Sun Nov 17, 2013 12:02 am

Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#185 Post by jazzo » Thu Apr 16, 2020 4:29 pm

Not to derail this thread even further, but this one made me laugh out loud , oh, so many years ago:

"I don't know what her problem is. She takes off her shirt to do a voice-over. What's her problem? The country could draw her tits from memory."

It's actually a very sweet film, too.

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bearcuborg
Joined: Fri Sep 14, 2007 2:30 am
Location: Philadelphia via Chicago

Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#186 Post by bearcuborg » Thu Apr 30, 2020 5:21 pm

Bringing it back to Peter, here’s the first few episodes (with transcripts too) of TCM’s new podcast with Peter.

I’ve been enjoying Peter on TCM lately. I finally caught up with his Buster Keaton doc. It’s not very good when it tells his life story but when Peter narrates his favorite clips it’s more interesting.

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hearthesilence
Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2005 4:22 am
Location: NYC

Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#187 Post by hearthesilence » Sun Oct 18, 2020 1:07 pm

It was mentioned earlier in this forum that it may not be possible to re-issue the director's cut of Texasville on BD because it was unknown if the proper materials exist. I'm still trying to track down more info on this, but a google search landed on this quote from what appears to be a 2003 newsgroup exchange hosted by critic Fred Camper:

"PB is not averse to recutting. He felt Columbia rushed him on Texasville, so he went back and recut it to achieve a better balance between comic and dramatic elements. Finished only on tape, that version was broadcast by Showtime with the unexpurgated Picture Show. It hasn't been shown theatrically because it doesn't exist on film." It's possible this guy is misinformed (for starters, he appears to get the cable channel wrong - see below), but still, it again raises the possibility that a costly re-creation of that edit would have to be done.

Anyway, some more bits and pieces I've dug up, including a late 2018 interview that suggests a film element wasn't created for the director's cut (though to be clear, Bogdanovich only states that a film print was not available)...

From an April 5, 1992 article in The Morning Call:

"....when Texasville premieres next month on the Movie Channel, it will be 28 minutes longer than its theatrical version.

"This is the way Texasville should have been seen when it was originally released," [Bogdanovich] said. "We had to take out a lot of the dramatic scenes between Jeff (Bridges) and Cybill and between Jeff and Timothy Bottoms.

"There was also a wonderful scene at the Centennial when Cybill sings a hymn. The balance between comedy and drama was off, so when the movie turned out to be a drama, people were thrown. Whereas the correct version, the longer version, has a better balance."

Why wasn't this "correct" version shown in theaters?

"We were cutting the picture under a lot of pressure," he said. "It didn't turn out like we wanted -- at all. It was rather sad. So now we're glad to have this second chance."

From an interview with Bogdanovich published 11/2013 in IndieWire:
Q: At Long Last Love just came out in a new cut. Are there any alternate cuts lying around or movies you’d like to tweak?

A: Well, that was quite an amazing story about how that came about… But there’s a director’s cut of Texasville that came out on laserdisc and I would dearly like for that to come out. It’s a much better film than the one that was released. It was available on Pioneer laserdisc for a while but that’s gone the way of the dodo bird. And I finally got Nickelodeon out in black-and-white on DVD and that was a big triumph. It’s a much better picture in black-and-white. As Dave Kehr in the New York Times said, “it becomes a totally different picture.” And he’s right – it does. But most of my films I’ve had problems with like Mask or Nickelodeon, have come out in versions that I prefer.

Q: Have you talked to Criterion about Texasville?

A: Yeah, we’ve talked about it and we’re still discussing it.

Interview with Bogdanovich from 9/2018 for Vulture/NYMag:

Q: Speaking of producers who bothered you: There are a lot of director’s cuts in the line-up of your Quad retro.

A: I wanted them to show the director’s cuts; I didn’t want to run the other versions. One problem is that Texasville is not available in the director’s cut except on a laserdisc, which they weren’t going to show. I’m trying to get the Criterion Collection to let me put together the director’s cut of Texasville, which is better in the sense that it’s a lot sadder. Because there’s 25 minutes missing [from the release version]. I wanted to reissue The Last Picture Show in theaters before we released the new film. The head of the studio when we were preparing to make the picture was Peter Guber, and he said, “Fine.” While we were shooting, Frank Price replaced him. Frank Price did not like me, and I did not like him, because he had already fucked up Mask, and I had fought with him on that. He didn’t want to reissue The Last Picture Show. He referred to that as “cheating.” I thought that was the stupidest thing I’d ever heard. And the movie wasn’t available at the time. So we cut a lot of the sadder parts that referred back to the earlier film — because audiences wouldn’t have had a chance to see it — and that left it more of a comedy.

And from a prior post:
Peter Bogdanovich wrote:When we were preparing Texasville, Peter Guber agreed to let me recut The Last Picture Show by adding certain footage to it. The picture had not yet appeared on video so the idea was to add some footage and make a new version of it and put it out in theaters prior to the opening of Texasville. That started to happen...I reviewed all the material and decided there were about seven minutes I wanted to put back in...I put back about seven minutes and then Frank Price took over Columbia and Frank didn't like me because of the situation that happened at Universal on Mask, so Frank pretty much sabotaged that plan, which was to bring Picture Show out and then Texasville, so that was sabotaged and didn't happen. What did happen was that Texasville had to be totally recut because I had to lose certain stuff that wouldn't make any sense if you haven't seen Picture Show. It wasn't available anywhere. So that was unfortunately very sad. Texasville came out and was perceived incorrectly because it wasn't what we made. It was perceived as too much of a comedy when in fact the original Texasville was more evenly balanced between comedy and drama. Subsequent to that the long version of The Last Picture Show was finished on 35mm and on laserdisc and is available on Criterion laserdisc, seven minutes longer...Pioneer did a director's cut of Texasville so that also exists on laserdisc in a version that's twenty-five minutes longer. But the only way to see those two pictures the way we would have like them to be shown one after the other is on laserdisc.

beamish14
Joined: Fri May 18, 2018 3:07 pm

Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#188 Post by beamish14 » Tue Jan 19, 2021 12:58 pm

Does anyone have much info on City Girl, Martha Coolidge's feature debut, which Bogdanovich produced in 1982? The film belatedly got a very small release in 1984, after Coolidge's film Valley Girl became a modest hit. It's extremely difficult to find nowadays, and I wonder who possesses the home video rights nowadays. I'm curious about the project's genesis as well.

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therewillbeblus
Joined: Tue Dec 22, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#189 Post by therewillbeblus » Tue Jan 19, 2021 6:10 pm

beamish14 wrote:
Tue Jan 19, 2021 12:58 pm
Does anyone have much info on City Girl, Martha Coolidge's feature debut, which Bogdanovich produced in 1982? The film belatedly got a very small release in 1984, after Coolidge's film Valley Girl became a modest hit. It's extremely difficult to find nowadays, and I wonder who possesses the home video rights nowadays. I'm curious about the project's genesis as well.
I see that a VHS rip is up on Vimeo (as well as her actual debut, Not a Pretty Picture) for free. I may be able to help, and will either PM you or post info publicly here if I get any intel that pertains to the thread.

beamish14
Joined: Fri May 18, 2018 3:07 pm

Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#190 Post by beamish14 » Tue Jan 19, 2021 6:15 pm

therewillbeblus wrote:
Tue Jan 19, 2021 6:10 pm
beamish14 wrote:
Tue Jan 19, 2021 12:58 pm
Does anyone have much info on City Girl, Martha Coolidge's feature debut, which Bogdanovich produced in 1982? The film belatedly got a very small release in 1984, after Coolidge's film Valley Girl became a modest hit. It's extremely difficult to find nowadays, and I wonder who possesses the home video rights nowadays. I'm curious about the project's genesis as well.
I see that a VHS rip is up on Vimeo (as well as her actual debut, Not a Pretty Picture) for free. I may be able to help, and will either PM you or post info publicly here if I get any intel that pertains to the thread.
Much obliged! I really appreciate it.

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soundchaser
Leave Her to Beaver
Joined: Sun Aug 28, 2016 12:32 am

Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#191 Post by soundchaser » Tue Jan 19, 2021 7:33 pm

beamish14 wrote:
Tue Jan 19, 2021 12:58 pm
Does anyone have much info on City Girl, Martha Coolidge's feature debut, which Bogdanovich produced in 1982? The film belatedly got a very small release in 1984, after Coolidge's film Valley Girl became a modest hit. It's extremely difficult to find nowadays, and I wonder who possesses the home video rights nowadays. I'm curious about the project's genesis as well.
Bogdanovich talks about it a little in the new book of interviews Peter Tonguette released last year:
Peter Bogdanovich wrote:I lost my shirt on that. Colleen came to me and said, “Martha has run out of money, and she’s making her first movie.” She made a documentary called Not a Pretty Picture, about when she was raped. I was interested in women’s problems and women’s issues. They showed me some of the movie—it was called Anne and Joey—and I thought it was rather charming. The girl was good, and the guy was good. They needed about a half-a-million dollars to finish it, so I put up the money. We did finish it. It became quite good—I helped her in the cutting—and we ended up calling it City Girl. We did a few previews, and we kept getting it right. Just when we got it right, we ran out of money. We never could afford to pay for the music rights.

...It was never released, but she has it—I gave it back to her. I’m sure it’ll end up in some archive. It’s worth seeing. It’s not a bad little picture. But it cost me a lot of money.
So it sounds like Coolidge herself owns the rights to it, if I’m understanding correctly.

beamish14
Joined: Fri May 18, 2018 3:07 pm

Re: Peter Bogdanovich

#192 Post by beamish14 » Wed Jan 20, 2021 4:21 pm

Thank you for that. I've had Tonguette's book in my to-buy queue for a while.

I really hope Bogdanovich publishes an all-encompassing memoir about his entire career. He didn't look like he was in the greatest shape when he was on TCM last year.

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