Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

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Maltic
Joined: Sat Oct 10, 2020 1:36 am

Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#326 Post by Maltic » Tue Feb 23, 2021 1:47 am

I misremembered, sort of. What Kline said on the podcast was:
John Woo's The Killer is a good example where they must have made hundreds and hundreds of prints off the original negative, and when we finally got to it back in the early days of DVD, it was a mess. I don't even know where that negative is now, but...

Nice to know that The Killer is on his mind, but it doesn't exactly sound like he's working on a release...

On the other hand, there's this Twitter reply from the KLStudioClassics account on August 17, 2020

Again, we would love to release them [Hard Boiled and The Killer], but last we heard they were both with another label, who'll most likely release them on Blu-ray, but not 4K.

Another North American label that doesn't do UHD... it does sound like Criterion. Of course, it could still take a years for Criterion to get them out, assuming they're the label in question.

I wonder what that Hawaii DCP looked like.

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The Elegant Dandy Fop
Joined: Thu Dec 09, 2004 3:25 am
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#327 Post by The Elegant Dandy Fop » Tue Feb 23, 2021 6:45 pm

yoloswegmaster wrote:
Mon Feb 22, 2021 2:09 pm
colinr0380 wrote:
Mon Feb 22, 2021 4:42 am


In a way if Criterion are going to tackle anything Hong Kong cinema related I would love to see them do some more John Woo. I don't know if Hard-Boiled and The Killer are available to return into the collection, but something like Bullet In The Head (which came to mind last week whilst watching The Deer Hunter, which Bullet In The Head is a kind of 'reimagining' of) would be a perfect fit for Criterion. But even with that, it would need someone with specialised knowledge to be able to go into some of the details surrounding the different versions there.
I recall a user on here saying that they went to a screening of 'Bullet in the Head' with John Woo in attendance, and John had said that the negatives for his preferred version were damaged. However, Grady Hendrix had said that the restoration had to be put on hold since the negatives went missing, so who knows what the real reason is for the delay.
That user was probably me. Woo didn't say it was damaged. He said it was probably thrown out. This is unfortunately some of the frustrating nature of Hong Kong cinema and their lack of preservation. Also the little bit of extra footage that exists of this film comes from a VHS submitted to film festivals. Not sure how the original ending was preserved as I believe the VCD has this less action oriented ending.

In terms of films by major directors, Ann Hui's debut The Secret has portions that came from a Betacam copy of the original cut and the original version of Tsui Hark's masterpiece, Dangerous Encounters of the First Kind, comes from a VHS his editor saved. I often think of how all these Hong Kong films were remastered with sloppy and awful 5.1 audio in the transition to DVD and that all these Blu-rays coming out of Hong Kong films are sourcing the original mono track to laserdisc copies of these films. Sort of insane to consider.

beamish14
Joined: Fri May 18, 2018 3:07 pm

Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#328 Post by beamish14 » Tue Feb 23, 2021 7:11 pm

The Elegant Dandy Fop wrote:
Tue Feb 23, 2021 6:45 pm
yoloswegmaster wrote:
Mon Feb 22, 2021 2:09 pm
colinr0380 wrote:
Mon Feb 22, 2021 4:42 am


In a way if Criterion are going to tackle anything Hong Kong cinema related I would love to see them do some more John Woo. I don't know if Hard-Boiled and The Killer are available to return into the collection, but something like Bullet In The Head (which came to mind last week whilst watching The Deer Hunter, which Bullet In The Head is a kind of 'reimagining' of) would be a perfect fit for Criterion. But even with that, it would need someone with specialised knowledge to be able to go into some of the details surrounding the different versions there.
I recall a user on here saying that they went to a screening of 'Bullet in the Head' with John Woo in attendance, and John had said that the negatives for his preferred version were damaged. However, Grady Hendrix had said that the restoration had to be put on hold since the negatives went missing, so who knows what the real reason is for the delay.
That user was probably me. Woo didn't say it was damaged. He said it was probably thrown out. This is unfortunately some of the frustrating nature of Hong Kong cinema and their lack of preservation. Also the little bit of extra footage that exists of this film comes from a VHS submitted to film festivals. Not sure how the original ending was preserved as I believe the VCD has this less action oriented ending.

In terms of films by major directors, Ann Hui's debut The Secret has portions that came from a Betacam copy of the original cut and the original version of Tsui Hark's masterpiece, Dangerous Encounters of the First Kind, comes from a VHS his editor saved. I often think of how all these Hong Kong films were remastered with sloppy and awful 5.1 audio in the transition to DVD and that all these Blu-rays coming out of Hong Kong films are sourcing the original mono track to laserdisc copies of these films. Sort of insane to consider.


It truly infuriates me that films from the 1990's (and even as recently as the 2000's in the case of The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford and possibly All the Pretty Horses) have unrecoverable original edits and that there is so little investment from studios to restore them. WB can piss away $100+ million USD on Justice League but can't toss in a red cent for films they tried their hardest to destroy like Being Human and Mike's Murder.

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L.A.
Joined: Thu May 28, 2009 7:33 am
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#329 Post by L.A. » Thu Feb 25, 2021 6:57 pm

DVD Compare has reviewed The Untold Story from Unearthed Films.

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L.A.
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#330 Post by L.A. » Sat Mar 06, 2021 11:02 am

Duel to the Death (1983) coming to Blu-ray this month. Great film.

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MichaelB
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#331 Post by MichaelB » Sat Mar 06, 2021 3:59 pm

No film with a fifteen-foot exploding ninja is entirely devoid of cultural merit.

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hearthesilence
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#332 Post by hearthesilence » Sat Mar 06, 2021 5:07 pm

beamish14 wrote:
Tue Feb 23, 2021 7:11 pm
It truly infuriates me that films from the 1990's (and even as recently as the 2000's in the case of The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford and possibly All the Pretty Horses) have unrecoverable original edits and that there is so little investment from studios to restore them. WB can piss away $100+ million USD on Justice League but can't toss in a red cent for films they tried their hardest to destroy like Being Human and Mike's Murder.
Two that really stick out for me is Demme's cut for Swing Shift (where even if the original elements of the lost/cut footage has survived, Hawn could legally block any attempt to restore his cut) and Lonergan's Margaret (where Cleveland Cavs owner Gary Gilbert is basically the douchebag that's in the way of a decent restoration). At least the cuts survive in some form, but it's especially frustrating with the latter because the film elements are definitely there.

The problem with "newer" films is that they no longer have to strike anything as good as a 35mm print. I think that's how some of these older cuts survive - you have a physical, high quality element that's produced, and if it manages to "escape" or if the studio holds on to it and protects it, it can become a more-than-decent source for a restoration even if the camera negative is lost. With the digital era, the tools should make it easier to preserve a high quality version of anyone's preferred cut - an editor somewhere could output as many high quality movie files as they want from their computer and have those survive on a drive somewhere - but the same tools also make it very easy for those things not to exist. Someone gives the command, and the editor just deletes that shit with a few clicks of a mouse. Probably the only thing that might exist is the project file, which to be fair is a lot better than nothing, but then you'd have to reconnect all the source material (probably with the same exact file structure as before) to whichever computer is opening that file, and who knows if you'd have that. With something a little bit older like Margaret, I think the director's cuts are probably sourced from screener files - that is, when it came time to view the cut, they compressed the shit out of it and exported some DVD files. Even before that, it may have been a crappy VHS tape. Now that streaming is common, I'm sure whatever they create for viewing has much higher quality, but there's probably a security protocol so that whatever digital file they'd need to create isn't easily copied or leaked.

beamish14
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#333 Post by beamish14 » Thu Apr 29, 2021 4:38 pm

Oh, shit. All titles are currently unavailable from Hong Kong Rescue. Maybe he's just updating it, but I'm scared that WB is cracking down on him.

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The Fanciful Norwegian
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 2:24 pm
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#334 Post by The Fanciful Norwegian » Thu Apr 29, 2021 5:25 pm

Drunken Master II is the only HKR release that belongs to WB. It would be a lot worse for them if Paramount cracked down over Miramax titles, since those make up the majority of their releases (and most of them were recently added to Paramount Plus).

beamish14
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#335 Post by beamish14 » Thu Apr 29, 2021 5:35 pm

The Fanciful Norwegian wrote:
Thu Apr 29, 2021 5:25 pm
Drunken Master II is the only HKR release that belongs to WB. It would be a lot worse for them if Paramount cracked down over Miramax titles, since those make up the majority of their releases (and most of them were recently added to Paramount Plus).
You're definitely right. I was actually surprised to see so many of those HK titles on Paramount+.

Still, maybe he's just updating it in anticipation of The Killer reaching the finish line.

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J Wilson
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#336 Post by J Wilson » Sun May 09, 2021 9:54 am

I just looked at the HKR site and everything, even Drunken Master II, appears to be orderable again.

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yoloswegmaster
Joined: Tue Nov 01, 2016 3:57 pm

Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#337 Post by yoloswegmaster » Wed Jun 23, 2021 12:10 pm

From Irongod regarding upcoming Sammo/HK releases:
Irongod2112 wrote:I think we have one more Sammo title coming out before the end of the year but I never know for sure for the dates are always changing and things can get bumped up or delayed.

There are still a ton of classic HK films coming from both Eureka & 88 Films so keep supporting the releases and we will get more!

I also recently assisted on a upcoming project from another label that's definitely gonna surprise you guys!!

2022 will be stacked with more Sammo for sure!

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The Elegant Dandy Fop
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#338 Post by The Elegant Dandy Fop » Wed Jun 23, 2021 1:44 pm

I doubt it’s connected to what yoloswegmaster posted, but I was told from a connection that an American label of cult films will be releasing their first Hong Kong title sometime late this year or next. Seems like there’s a boom lately with these films. I just want someone to release Yes, Madam, She Shoots Straight or any of the Sammo Hung produced films!

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yoloswegmaster
Joined: Tue Nov 01, 2016 3:57 pm

Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#339 Post by yoloswegmaster » Wed Jun 23, 2021 7:11 pm

The Elegant Dandy Fop wrote:
Wed Jun 23, 2021 1:44 pm
I doubt it’s connected to what yoloswegmaster posted, but I was told from a connection that an American label of cult films will be releasing their first Hong Kong title sometime late this year or next. Seems like there’s a boom lately with these films. I just want someone to release Yes, Madam, She Shoots Straight or any of the Sammo Hung produced films!
Is that label you're referring to Massacre Video with their upcoming releases of the 'Men Behind the Sun' films?

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The Elegant Dandy Fop
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#340 Post by The Elegant Dandy Fop » Wed Jun 23, 2021 8:41 pm

yoloswegmaster wrote:
Wed Jun 23, 2021 7:11 pm
The Elegant Dandy Fop wrote:
Wed Jun 23, 2021 1:44 pm
I doubt it’s connected to what yoloswegmaster posted, but I was told from a connection that an American label of cult films will be releasing their first Hong Kong title sometime late this year or next. Seems like there’s a boom lately with these films. I just want someone to release Yes, Madam, She Shoots Straight or any of the Sammo Hung produced films!
Is that label you're referring to Massacre Video with their upcoming releases of the 'Men Behind the Sun' films?
It’s a label that’s made no indications or hints that they are going to release Hong Kong films and I don’t think have ever released a film from Asia.

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barbarella satyricon
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#341 Post by barbarella satyricon » Sun Jun 27, 2021 2:41 am

Posted over in the WKW box thread about Nova Media’s release of Eric Kot’s First Love: The Litter on the Breeze.

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dwk
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#342 Post by dwk » Sun Jun 27, 2021 2:55 am

The Elegant Dandy Fop wrote:
Wed Jun 23, 2021 8:41 pm
It’s a label that’s made no indications or hints that they are going to release Hong Kong films and I don’t think have ever released a film from Asia.
The only labels that I can think of that haven't released a film from any Asian country are Blue Underground and Vinegar Syndrome. And I don't think acquiring new titles fits in with BU's current business model...

pistolwink
Joined: Thu Dec 12, 2013 3:07 am

Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#343 Post by pistolwink » Tue Jul 27, 2021 9:40 pm

Has anyone gotten their copy of the The Killer from Hong Kong Rescue yet? I understand he's just one guy (for now) but waiting over two months after the release of a title for it to be shipped is pushing it—even for a bootlegger.

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feihong
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#344 Post by feihong » Tue Jul 27, 2021 9:48 pm

In my experience he always gets to it, but the orders do take a long time. I don't have a physical copy of the killer yet, either; it maybe makes sense to do the digital download if you can burn your own copy.

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scubadonc
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#345 Post by scubadonc » Tue Jul 27, 2021 11:41 pm

My last order took nearly 3 months and he never responded to my emails. While I didn't appreciate the stress and uncertainty, his discs are soooo worth the wait!

isakorg2
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#346 Post by isakorg2 » Wed Jul 28, 2021 10:28 am

Well, glad to see I'm not alone in each day going out to the mailbox to see if it's finally arrived. I had the same wait for Hard-Boiled and (as I recall) a slightly shorter wait for Peking Opera Blues, and I knew the wait for The Killer was going to be even worse. Isn't this the record holder for the number of botched digital issuances of a most wanted film?
All I can say is that Hard-Boiled and Peking Opera Blues were more than worth the wait - superb work. And after I receive The Killer, I have 2021 to look forward to and another ridiculous wait for Jacob's current project, Bullet in the Head. One problem is that his hoopla as he approaches and then arrives at a completion date creates a reaction in us akin to the atmosphere of expectation of jockeys and their horses awaiting the start bell in a race - "... and they're off!". It creates the illusion (thank your nervous systems for this) that copies of the newest HKR release are hurtling at us with the velocity of a comet. While actually the stretch of time between release announcement and receiving the disc is more akin to the pace set by a miles long tunnel being dug - with spoons - by convicts trying to escape from prison.

Who knows - today might be the day!

Glowingwabbit
Joined: Wed May 01, 2013 1:27 pm

Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#347 Post by Glowingwabbit » Wed Jul 28, 2021 11:18 am

I've seen some folks on Twitter say it's taken up to 5-6 months so that's the timeline I'm working with before getting worried The hard part is he doesn't get to email responses either. I kinda wish he'd stop taking orders until he's more caught up at least.

I am curious does anyone else have their order number not show up on the site when checking status order (as in it doesn't even say "pending"). Neither of mine show as existing.

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The Elegant Dandy Fop
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#348 Post by The Elegant Dandy Fop » Wed Jul 28, 2021 11:43 am

I’m still bitter as he sent me a faulty copy of Supercop and my numerous e-mails over the last year have been completely ignored. I personally think he’s in over his head as he cannot meet the demand on these discs considering the high profile titles he’s choosing. It’s worth mentioning that Supercop was my second faulty disc as my initial purchase of Peking Opera Blues came with two blank discs. Also his e-mails get a bit too personal and odd for my taste, especially when he was discussing his divorce.

pistolwink
Joined: Thu Dec 12, 2013 3:07 am

Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#349 Post by pistolwink » Thu Jul 29, 2021 3:12 pm

You'd think by this point he'd anticipate demand and churn out a few 100 or even a few 1,000 copies prior to the ostensible release date. That's just basic business. On the other hand, someone with basic business sense wouldn't run a company that sells bootleg copies, on an easily-accessible website graced with his proper name, of someone else's intellectual property. I'm just sort of waiting for him to get shut down by a lawsuit or a threatened lawsuit—it's sort of amazing it hasn't happened yet.

I'm tempted, next time, to just send him some money on PayPal (for his time/effort) and download the MKVs, rather than actually placing a proper order. It's not as though the websites where one might find the latter are any more legally dubious than HKR's efforts.

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The Pachyderminator
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Re: Hong Kong Cinema: A Guide

#350 Post by The Pachyderminator » Fri Jul 30, 2021 10:23 pm

He does offer download-only purchases at half price, if you don't want a burned disc or are okay with burning your own.

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