Ennio Morricone (1928-2020)

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flyonthewall2983
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Re: Ennio Morricone (1928-2020)

#26 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Tue Jul 07, 2020 3:55 pm

hearthesilence wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 3:20 am
John Zorn's The Big Gundown may be one of my three or four favorite jazz albums from the past 50 years. It's not on Spotify in the U.S. but you can listen to it here. (It really needs to be heard on a stereo system with a good pair of speakers.)
Ennio Morricone wrote:[The Big Gundown] that has fresh, good and intelligent ideas. It is realization on a high level, a work done by a maestro with great science-fantasy and creativity. At times my works have been varied from but it doesn’t change anything because the pieces are still recognizable. My ideas have been realized not in a passive manner, but in an active manner which has recreated and re-invented what I have done previously for films. Many people have done versions of my pieces, but no one has done them like this.
I have this on CD. Might dust it off soon but it's been awhile since I heard it. It must be the only album with both Diamanda Galas and Toots Thielman on it.

Orlac
Joined: Tue Apr 14, 2009 4:29 am

Re: Ennio Morricone (1928-2020)

#27 Post by Orlac » Tue Jul 07, 2020 8:16 pm

ianthemovie wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 9:31 am
therewillbeblus wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 12:00 am
Those are mine, Conpaneros for his capacity for wildness turned up to 11, and Navajo Joe for being so thunderously dramatic, especially in its repurposed use in Kill Bill vol. 2 which is my favorite musical moment in a Tarantino movie
Also used to memorable and hilarious effect in Alexander Payne's Election, which is where I first heard it.
I first heard it in the Hong Kong movie Hit-Man in the Hand of Buddha!

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flyonthewall2983
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Re: Passages

#28 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Tue Jul 07, 2020 8:47 pm

This brings up a good question, is there another film composer who's work is more repurposed than his? I bet it's not even close.
Dylan wrote:
Mon Jul 06, 2020 9:40 pm
Around the same time, De Palma was in discussions to helm a sequel to The Untouchables and I recall him mentioning in an interview that he wanted Morricone to come back for that, but that project never got off the ground.
I remember reading about this. It was actually a prequel, with younger versions of Capone and Malone squaring off. The names being floated around for them were Nicolas Cage and Gerard Butler.

There were attempts at making a movie about Elliot Ness' downfall into alcoholism. I read in a book written by Joe Eszterhas that he had worked on a script about it and that DePalma and Kevin Costner were game to do it, but never went off the ground. And then about 10 or so years ago David Fincher was attached to something about the case that drove Ness to the bottle, with Matt Damon's name being bandied about for it.

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Rayon Vert
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Re: Ennio Morricone (1928-2020)

#29 Post by Rayon Vert » Tue Jul 07, 2020 10:34 pm

Orca - he knew how to write a tune to make a child or an adult cry.

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Randall Maysin
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Re: Ennio Morricone (1928-2020)

#30 Post by Randall Maysin » Sun Jul 19, 2020 8:13 am

I like how passionate, moving, soulful, yet also how incredibly perverse and acrid Morricone usually is all at once. He wrote at least 70 brilliant scores. One of the very best, and my new all-time favorite from him, which i just started listening to an hour ago, is his absolutely incredible soundtrack for Elio Petri's semi-obscure 1979 film Buone notizie (Good News), which seems to incorporate quite a bit of jazz, an influence which I'd never encountered before in Morricone's work, although if i thought about it, maybe I'd realize that's not true.

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flyonthewall2983
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Ennio Morricone (1928-2020)

#31 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Sun Jul 19, 2020 4:38 pm

I liked The Legend of 1900 a lot. I only had heard about it because of Roger Waters' involvement in the song at the end "Lost Boys Calling". I'd have to watch it again to give an appropriate measure to how I feel about it, but the music is pretty vital to it all since it is about music. This cue stands out as being memorable for me, in the kind of loneliness it evokes relating to the movie's lead character.

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flyonthewall2983
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Re: Ennio Morricone (1928-2020)

#32 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Fri Jan 14, 2022 10:44 pm

New album Cinema Suites, for Violin and Orchestra released today
After his last public concert at the Italian Senate in Rome (January 2020), Ennio Morricone finished the transcription of this unpublished collection, which recasts the themes of his most famous scores in suites transcribed for violin and orchestra. The work was carried out in close collaboration with Marco Serino, his violinist for twenty years, and dedicated to him as a fruit of their artistic partnership.

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