Get Carter

Discuss DVDs and Blu-rays released by the BFI and the films on them.

Moderator: MichaelB

Post Reply
Message
Author
User avatar
yoloswegmaster
Joined: Tue Nov 01, 2016 3:57 pm

Get Carter

#1 Post by yoloswegmaster » Fri Apr 22, 2022 11:28 am

Image

Michael Caine is Jack Carter, the London gangland enforcer who returns to his hometown of Newcastle to avenge his brother’s death. Rarely has the criminal underworld been so realistically portrayed as in this 1971 masterpiece. Shot on location, resulting in a devastatingly authentic snapshot of life in the north east of England in the late-industrial period, Get Carter remains arguably the grittiest and greatest of all British crime films.

Newly restored in 4K from the original camera negative by the BFI, and approved by director Mike Hodges, Get Carter is back, and looking and sounding better than ever.
Limited edition 2-disc set
4K (2160p) UHD Blu-ray presentation in Dolby Vision (HDR10 compatible)
Audio commentary featuring Michael Caine, Mike Hodges and Wolfgang Suschitzky (2009)
Newly recorded audio commentary featuring Kim Newman and Barry Forshaw
Isolated score by Roy Budd
Mike Hodges in Conversation (2022)
Johnny Trunk on Roy Budd (2022): the founder of cult label Trunk Records revisits Roy Budd’s iconic score
Interview with Petra Markham (2022): newly recorded interview with the actress who recalls her work on Get Carter
Interview with Tony Klinger (2022): newly recorded interview with the son of the legendary Michael Klinger, producer of Get Carter
The Ship Hotel - Tyne Main (1967, 33 mins): Philip Trevelyan’s wonderful film about a pub on the banks of the River Tyne and the colourful cast of regulars who frequent it
International theatrical trailer
Michael Caine’s message to premiere attendees (1971, 1 min)
2022 theatrical trailer
Script gallery
80-page perfect-bound book featuring new writing by Mark Kermode, Tim Pelan, John Oliver and Jason Wood. Also includes Alex Cox’s original Moviedrome intro, extracts from the original press book, production stills and notes on the restoration by the BFI’s Douglas Weir
Double-sided poster featuring the original US one-sheet and original UK quad
A set of postcards featuring iconic characters from the film
Newly created English subtitles for the Deaf and partial hearing
Newly created audio description track
**All extras are TBC and subject to change**

User avatar
MichaelB
Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:20 pm
Location: Worthing
Contact:

Re: Get Carter

#2 Post by MichaelB » Fri Jun 17, 2022 7:17 am

Full specs announced:
Michael Caine in
GET CARTER
A film by Mike Hodges
Co-starring Ian Hendry, John Osborne & Britt Ekland

BFI 2-disc Limited Edition UHD – only 10,000 copies available & 2-disc Limited Edition Blu-ray – only 5,000 copies available, released on 25 July 2022


See the new trailer here

Michael Caine is Jack Carter, the London gangland enforcer who returns to his hometown of Newcastle to investigate his brother’s death. Rarely has the criminal underworld been so realistically portrayed as in this 1971 masterpiece, directed by Mike Hodges from his own screenplay of the novel Jack Returns Home by Ted Lewis. Shot on location, resulting in a devastatingly authentic snapshot of life in the north east of England, GET CARTER remains arguably the grittiest and greatest of all British crime films.

Newly restored in 4K from the original camera negative by the BFI, and approved by director Mike Hodges, GET CARTER is back, and looking and sounding better than ever. It will be released by the BFI in partnership with Warner Bros. Entertainment UK Ltd on both UHD and Blu-ray on 25 July 2022 with an incredible collection of extras. Both formats are packaged inside rigid slipcases and come with an 80-page perfect-bound book, a double-sided poster featuring the original UK quad and the 2022 re-release artwork and a set of four postcards featuring iconic scenes from the film.

Special features
• UHD - 4K (2160p) presentation in Dolby Vision (HDR10 compatible)
• Blu-ray - presented in High Definition
• Newly recorded introduction by Michael Caine (2022, 3 mins)
• Audio commentary featuring Mike Hodges, Michael Caine and Wolfgang Suschitzky (2000)
• Audio commentary featuring Kim Newman and Barry Forshaw (2022)
• Isolated score by Roy Budd
Mike Hodges in Conversation (2022, 60 mins): the director discusses his career in this interview recorded at BFI Southbank
Klinger on Klinger (2022, 24 mins): Tony Klinger recalls and evaluates the career of his father, Michael Klinger, Producer of Get Carter
Don’t Trust Boys (2022, 22 mins): actor Petra Markham reflects upon her career on stage and screen, and recalls her role in Get Carter
The Sound of Roy Budd (2022, 17 mins): Jonny Trunk explores the varied career of Roy Budd, and revisits his iconic score for Get Carter
• BBC Look North location report (1970, 5 mins)
• Roy Budd Plays ‘Get Carter’ (1971, 4 mins)
• Michael Caine’s message to premiere attendees (1971, 1 min)
The Ship Hotel – Tyne Main (1967, 33 mins): Philip Trevelyan’s evocative documentary film about a pub on the banks of the River Tyne
• International trailer (1971)
• Re-release trailer (2022)
• Script gallery
• ***First pressing only*** 80-page book with a new essays by Mark Kermode and Tim Pelan; Alex Cox’s introduction to the 1990 Moviedrome TV broadcast; an essay on composer Rod Budd and interviews with contemporary musicians/soundtrack composers by Jason Wood; biographies of Mike Hodges and Michael Caine by John Oliver; an extract from Michael Caine’s autobiography What’s It All About; credits and notes on the special features and restoration

Product details
UHD RRP: £34.99 / Cat. no. BFIU0003 / 18
UK / 1971 / colour / 111 mins / English language, with optional subtitles for the Deaf and partial hearing, and audio description / original aspect ratio 1.85:1 // Disc 1: UHD100, 2160p, 24fps, PCM 2.0 mono audio | Disc 2: BD25, 1080p, 24fps, Dolby Digital audio

Blu-ray RRP: £29.99 / Cat. no. BFIB1465 / 18
UK / 1971 / colour / 111 mins / English language, with optional subtitles for the Deaf and partial hearing, and audio description / original aspect ratio 1.85:1 // Disc 1: BD50, 1080p, 24fps, PCM 2.0 mono audio | Disc 2: BD25, 1080p, 24fps, Dolby Digital audio

User avatar
ryannichols7
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2012 2:26 pm

Re: Get Carter

#3 Post by ryannichols7 » Fri Jun 17, 2022 8:20 am

maybe my insomnia is missing it, but does the UHD edition contain the film on the second bluray? or is it two UHD discs?

User avatar
tenia
Ask Me About My Bassoon
Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 11:13 am

Re: Get Carter

#4 Post by tenia » Fri Jun 17, 2022 10:07 am

The UHD release isn't dual format, so you either have :
- a UHD + an extra BD for some of the extras
- a BD + the same extra BD

User avatar
Finch
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2008 5:09 pm
Location: Edinburgh, UK

Re: Get Carter

#5 Post by Finch » Sat Jul 23, 2022 12:37 pm


User avatar
rapta
Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2014 5:04 pm
Location: Hants, UK

Re: Get Carter

#6 Post by rapta » Sun Jul 24, 2022 2:17 pm

As expected, BFI have knocked it out of the park. Hope WB allow them to do another title, since this was such a success...or it will be (early call but bound to be in the end-of-year lists).

videozor
Joined: Sat Aug 18, 2007 11:16 am
Location: Brooklyn, NY, USA

Re: Get Carter

#7 Post by videozor » Sun Jul 24, 2022 3:58 pm

Can they do something similar to Performance?

User avatar
Finch
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2008 5:09 pm
Location: Edinburgh, UK

Re: Get Carter

#8 Post by Finch » Wed Aug 24, 2022 5:29 pm

Anyone wanting to get a copy of the LE might want to act sooner than later. BFI said on Facebook they have less than 1000 units left in their warehouse, and after that, you're relying on third party retailer stock and ebay scalpers.

User avatar
therewillbeblus
Joined: Tue Dec 22, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: Get Carter

#9 Post by therewillbeblus » Wed Aug 24, 2022 6:09 pm

I haven't explored the book yet, but the LE is very nice. I never care for these foldout posters, but this one is awesome and I can see myself actually putting it up somewhere someday

User avatar
therewillbeblus
Joined: Tue Dec 22, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: Get Carter

#10 Post by therewillbeblus » Thu Aug 25, 2022 1:53 am

I revisited this earlier in the year before the announcement, but another viewing elevated my appreciation for it- less as a gangster revenge flick than an inverted James Bond movie squeezed of its humor, jingoism, and relaxed vibe. There's bare-minimum morality in seeking justice for the innocent -namely the niece, whose corrupted victimization becomes Carter's one agreeable aim- but all the retribution feels wholly self-serving. "Did he know he was my brother" seems as much of an egoist remark as one of personal guilt or punishment enforced on principle. Caine plays into the superhuman sex-magnet vehicle Connery perfected, only opportunistically removed from identification via clinical degradation. It's just such nasty stuff, but the filmmakers know that Bond is too, just dressed up as something false. Here's a brutal gangster operating much the same way- using people as he pleases, evaluating his schema with detached sociopathic awareness, and mistaking narcissism as confidence when they both lead to invincibility. This is why the very end is a sick joke that both cements the film's ethos and destroy's the Bond franchise's at once. I guess if Caine was never going to be Bond, it makes sense that he'd eviscerate the type of character in an anti-entry here. The narrative trajectory and engagement with various levels of baddies on the food chain even fits like a glove, at least as much as it does a neo-noir.

User avatar
Drucker
Your Future our Drucker
Joined: Wed May 18, 2011 9:37 am

Re: Get Carter

#11 Post by Drucker » Tue Sep 27, 2022 11:02 pm

Count me in as another admirer, with my first ever watch being just now with the beautiful new BFI release. At first the film won me over with its slow build. Nearly 45 minutes in and we know very little about this guy's overall mission, and as we move along with him, have uncovered very little. As he starts poking his head in more and more places he shouldn't, Carter is not kicking ass and taking names. Instead, he's frequently on the run. Maybe because I'm just so used to modern action films, I was shocked at how much restraint there was.
SpoilerShow
Using a vehicle as a weapon, Caine opts to knock the door off, without aiming at the person. He kills one person on a boat, and lets some others get away without firing additional shots. It's as if he waits until the awful reveal at his niece to lose that restraint and just be content with a killing spree, in addition to his original mission
. So when the violence really comes to this film, it's earned. And yet it remains so sparse that the tension is always there, never really settled, not even at the end.

Post Reply