Passages

A subforum to discuss film culture and criticism both old and new, as well as memorializing public figures we've lost.
Post Reply
Message
Author
User avatar
colinr0380
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 4:30 pm
Location: Chapel-en-le-Frith, Derbyshire, UK

Re: Passages

#11101 Post by colinr0380 » Tue Sep 05, 2023 8:04 pm

Gayle Hunnicutt on 31st August.

I don't really remember too much about Dallas to speak to her role there, so the role that most comes to my mind is her appearance as part of the ensemble cast in The Legend of Hell House (which I like to think of as the wildly entertaining 'exploitation' version of The Haunting! Without tipping into being quite as utterly ridiculous as the Haunting remake! That's the beauty of being 'constrained' by being made before the CGI era, I suppose!). She reteamed with Roddy McDowall in the 1980 TV mini-series adaptation of Ray Bradbury's The Martian Chronicles (from Logan's Run and Around The World in 80 Days director Michael Anderson!).

She is in a lot of the films that Indicator have put out recently: she is in Fragment of Fear and Voices (both co-starring with then husband David Hemmings) and also in Eye of the Cat.

Lots of other fun things: her first film was the 1966 Roger Corman directed-Peter Bogdanovich written biker film The Wild Angels (the film that helped to get Bogdanovich to his directorial debut with Targets). She is the love interest in the James Garner Marlowe film (which of course is most famous for its 'Bruce Lee destroying Marlowe's office' scene). And she had a big 1985-1986 with her minor but significant role as the kidnapped mother in Arthur Penn's Target (which I think is a big unacknowledged influence on the Taken series, especially the second(? I think. That series has all run together in my mind!) when Famke Janssen's character gets kidnapped instead of the daughter) as well as one of the more overlooked Alan J. Pakula thrillers, Dream Lover.

But the things that really sound fascinating are her roles in a 1980 mini-series of Fantômas starring with Helmut Berger with two episodes directed by Claude Chabrol and the other two by Luis Bunuel's son! And she was also in the first screen adaptation of Hard To Be A God, adapted by Jean-Claude Carrière in a cast that includes Werner Herzog and Pierre Clementi!

User avatar
hearthesilence
Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2005 4:22 am
Location: NYC

Re: Passages

#11102 Post by hearthesilence » Wed Sep 06, 2023 12:21 am

Former U.S. Congressman, ambassador to the United Nations, Secretary of Energy and governor of New Mexico Bill Richardson at 75. Very popular and very effective throughout his distinguished political career, he was best-known for his remarkable ability to negotiate the release of prisoners held captive by the most difficult and tyrannical men imaginable. (He once told an audience that the key to doing so was to "Respect the other side. Try to connect personally. Use sense of humor. Let the other side save face.")

User avatar
Mr Sausage
Not PETA approved
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 9:02 pm
Location: Canada

Passages

#11103 Post by Mr Sausage » Thu Sep 07, 2023 8:26 am

Translator Edith Grossman, probably best known for her universally praised 2003 translation of Don Quixote. You’ll undoubtably have seen its red cover with an out of focus knight’s helmet. She was also a long time translator of Boom novelists like Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Mario Vargas Llosa.

If you haven’t gotten around to Don Quixote yet, grab yourself a copy of her translation and settle in for some fine entertainment. It isn’t always that you get an established literary classic and cultural touchstone that’s also grand public entertainment.

User avatar
ando
Bringing Out El Duende
Joined: Mon Dec 06, 2004 6:53 pm
Location: New York City

Re: Passages

#11104 Post by ando » Thu Sep 07, 2023 5:44 pm

Mr Sausage wrote:
Thu Sep 07, 2023 8:26 am
Translator Edith Grossman, probably best known for her universally praised 2003 translation of Don Quixote. You’ll undoubtably have seen its red cover with an out of focus knight’s helmet. She was also a long time translator of Boom novelists like Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Mario Vargas Llosa.

If you haven’t gotten around to Don Quixote yet, grab yourself a copy of her translation and settle in for some fine entertainment. It isn’t always that you get an established literary classic and cultural touchstone that’s also grand public entertainment.
In total agreement, MS. Spent years loading copies of Grossman's translation on the shelves of Barnes & Noble (though I must confess that the Gerald J. Davis translation has been my favorite). Can't recall ever selling it. But I suppose like most great translations that have become standards it sells itself.

User avatar
headacheboy
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 8:57 pm

Re: Passages

#11105 Post by headacheboy » Thu Sep 07, 2023 11:00 pm

ando wrote:
Thu Sep 07, 2023 5:44 pm
Mr Sausage wrote:
Thu Sep 07, 2023 8:26 am
Translator Edith Grossman, probably best known for her universally praised 2003 translation of Don Quixote. You’ll undoubtably have seen its red cover with an out of focus knight’s helmet. She was also a long time translator of Boom novelists like Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Mario Vargas Llosa.

If you haven’t gotten around to Don Quixote yet, grab yourself a copy of her translation and settle in for some fine entertainment. It isn’t always that you get an established literary classic and cultural touchstone that’s also grand public entertainment.
In total agreement, MS. Spent years loading copies of Grossman's translation on the shelves of Barnes & Noble (though I must confess that the Gerald J. Davis translation has been my favorite). Can't recall ever selling it. But I suppose like most great translations that have become standards it sells itself.
I have a copy of it but I've yet to read her translation. I read Davis' translation years ago. I thoroughly enjoy Don Quixote and now maybe it is finally time for me to re-read it and pay homage to Grossman's work which I've always read great things about!

User avatar
swo17
Bloodthirsty Butcher
Joined: Tue Apr 15, 2008 10:25 am
Location: SLC, UT

Re: Passages

#11106 Post by swo17 » Thu Sep 07, 2023 11:29 pm

I took a university Spanish class where we had to read the untranslated Don Quixote, which was no small task because it's written in like Ye Olde Spanish or whatever. I imagine it would've been quite the challenge to translate!

User avatar
therewillbeblus
Joined: Tue Dec 22, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: Passages

#11107 Post by therewillbeblus » Thu Sep 07, 2023 11:35 pm

My sister works in the translating/publishing field, specifically Spanish to English from South American countries, but focused on an indie market of lesser-known artists (as she puts it - their motto, coincidentally, is, “Who needs the 15th translation of Don Quixote when so many other artists have no translation at all?”) Anyways, she rarely gives as strong of an opinion as she did when I asked which version of Don Quixote should I read - and it was Grossman’s translation for too many reasons I’ll never remember. It’s still at the top of my ‘to-read’ pile, always getting cut in line by some enthusiastic rec, but I want to give it the attention I know it deserves

User avatar
hearthesilence
Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2005 4:22 am
Location: NYC

Re: Passages

#11108 Post by hearthesilence » Fri Sep 08, 2023 2:34 am

Bassist Richard Davis, whose long and distinguished career found him playing with so many of the pre-eminent jazz artists of the past 60 or 70 years. He can be heard on Eric Dolphy's Out to Lunch!, Andrew Hill's Point of Departure, David Murray's The Hill, Bobby Hutcherson's Dialogue and Sarah Vaughan's Swingin' Easy (all great albums, all personal favorites) among many, many others.

He was also in constant demand as a session musician and appeared on many records outside of jazz, including key albums in Bruce Springsteen, Paul Simon and Kate & Anna McGarrigle's careers. He's likely best known for Van Morrison's Astral Weeks, but he was never really impressed by it, pointing out that they had very little prep or barely heard from Morrison about what to play. Morrison's original bassist (who producer Lewis Merenstein replaced with Davis) even claims he already gave all of Morrison's songs bass parts and that Davis simply embellished on them. Regardless, even if he had skipped those dates, there's no shortage of classics in his discography.

User avatar
headacheboy
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 8:57 pm

Re: Passages

#11109 Post by headacheboy » Fri Sep 08, 2023 5:44 pm

therewillbeblus wrote:
Thu Sep 07, 2023 11:35 pm
My sister works in the translating/publishing field, specifically Spanish to English from South American countries, but focused on an indie market of lesser-known artists (as she puts it - their motto, coincidentally, is, “Who needs the 15th translation of Don Quixote when so many other artists have no translation at all?”) Anyways, she rarely gives as strong of an opinion as she did when I asked which version of Don Quixote should I read - and it was Grossman’s translation for too many reasons I’ll never remember. It’s still at the top of my ‘to-read’ pile, always getting cut in line by some enthusiastic rec, but I want to give it the attention I know it deserves
She doesn't happen to work for World Editions, does she? Certainly one of my favorite imprints who do focus on South American countries (not to mention other countries across the globe).

User avatar
therewillbeblus
Joined: Tue Dec 22, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: Passages

#11110 Post by therewillbeblus » Fri Sep 08, 2023 6:00 pm

headacheboy wrote:
Fri Sep 08, 2023 5:44 pm
She doesn't happen to work for World Editions, does she?
She works for Two Lines Press based out of San Francisco. A cursory search of their website, which seems very submission-focused, is a misrepresentation for that reason. They do translate poetry and English to Spanish in addition to Spanish to English, and work with similar boutique markets in South American countries for these kinds of art-swapsies

User avatar
Mr Sausage
Not PETA approved
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 9:02 pm
Location: Canada

Re: Passages

#11111 Post by Mr Sausage » Fri Sep 08, 2023 8:03 pm

therewillbeblus wrote:
headacheboy wrote:
Fri Sep 08, 2023 5:44 pm
She doesn't happen to work for World Editions, does she?
She works for Two Lines Press based out of San Francisco. A cursory search of their website, which seems very submission-focused, is a misrepresentation for that reason. They do translate poetry and English to Spanish in addition to Spanish to English, and work with similar boutique markets in South American countries for these kinds of art-swapsies
Oh no kidding! One of my favourite presses. I’m grateful for their editions of Wolfgang Hilbig’s work. Their covers are always lovely as well.

User avatar
jegharfangetmigenmyg
Joined: Wed Nov 16, 2011 7:52 am

Re: Passages

#11112 Post by jegharfangetmigenmyg » Sat Sep 09, 2023 2:59 am

hearthesilence wrote:
Fri Sep 08, 2023 2:34 am
He's likely best known for Van Morrison's Astral Weeks, but he was never really impressed by it, pointing out that they had very little prep or barely heard from Morrison about what to play. Morrison's original bassist (who producer Lewis Merenstein replaced with Davis) even claims he already gave all of Morrison's songs bass parts and that Davis simply embellished on them. Regardless, even if he had skipped those dates, there's no shortage of classics in his discography.
Wow, didn't know that! His playing on that album is amazing, and to me really carrying the music behind Morrisons vocals. I would never have thought that the parts he's playing were someone else's. They appear very free-flowing and improvised to my ears.

Thanks for the jazz recommendations, as well. Heard them all, but not yet the David Murray. Finally got around to Hutcherson's discography a year ago, and even though I'm usually not big fan of vibes in jazz (have a hard time getting into albums where it's the main instruments), there are quite some nuggets in his work. Stick-Up! is my favorite of his, though it doesn't feature Davis.

User avatar
GaryC
Joined: Fri Mar 28, 2008 3:56 pm
Location: Aldershot, Hampshire, UK

Re: Passages

#11113 Post by GaryC » Sun Sep 17, 2023 4:04 am

Horace Ové, aged 86. Born in Trinidad and Tobago, he became the first black director of a British feature film, with Pressure (1976). A restoration of that film is due to play in the London Film Festival next month, followed by a Blu-ray release in 2024. He was knighted in 2022.

beamish14
Joined: Fri May 18, 2018 3:07 pm

Re: Passages

#11114 Post by beamish14 » Mon Sep 18, 2023 3:16 pm

Pete Kozachik, VFX supervisor and cinematographer who was DP on The Nightmare Before Christmas and Coraline. Published a memoir a few years ago that I’ve been meaning to read

User avatar
hearthesilence
Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2005 4:22 am
Location: NYC

Re: Passages

#11115 Post by hearthesilence » Tue Sep 19, 2023 10:31 am

Bérénice Reynaud, author of New Chinas/New Cinemas and Hou Hsiao-hsien’s A City of Sadness. She was teaching at the California Institute of the Arts and also worked extensively as a critic, curator and editor. (She edited the Senses of Cinema dossier devoted to Chantal Akerman.)

User avatar
fdm
Joined: Fri Apr 21, 2006 1:25 pm

Re: Passages

#11116 Post by fdm » Wed Sep 20, 2023 4:41 am

Charles Gayle (also)

He was featured in the Fire Music documentary that's still streaming on the Criterion Channel.

User avatar
jazzo
Joined: Sun Nov 17, 2013 12:02 am

Re: Passages

#11117 Post by jazzo » Wed Sep 20, 2023 8:38 am

Frank autobiographical cartoonist, Joe Matt https://www.comicsbeat.com/rip-joe-matt/, has passed.

Joe, along with Chester Brown and Seth, was one third of the spectacular triumvirate of alt artists breaking new ground in 90s independent comics.

A frequent visitor to Canada, I'd met him a few times in my capacity as Beguiling/TCAF co-manager, and found him to be, like a lot of comic artists, witty, engagingly intelligent, but also socially awkward and full of shit.

My favourite story was when one of my female co-workers - a huge Joe Matt fan - went up to him to get her copy of The Poor Bastard signed, and he asked her what he should write. She said something shocking and interesting, so he drew a little caricature of himself with the following note: "Hey Amy, for a maybe-not-so-good fuck, call Joe Matt..." and wrote his number down.

It became one of her prized possessions.

beamish14
Joined: Fri May 18, 2018 3:07 pm

Re: Passages

#11118 Post by beamish14 » Wed Sep 20, 2023 9:45 am

Oh, no. Joe Matt was a wonderful talent.

As an aside, I’ve never been to TCAF, but I do own several shirts from them, and I frequent the Beguiling whenever I’m in Toronto

User avatar
jazzo
Joined: Sun Nov 17, 2013 12:02 am

Re: Passages

#11119 Post by jazzo » Wed Sep 20, 2023 10:02 am

I left it and TCAF about a decade ago. Needed more stability than running the library department for a small bookseller could offer, and TCAF was transitioning into the next generation of staff, anyway. But I'm still close friends with Chris, Andrew, Peter and Bryan O'Malley, and still frequent the store every week for new releases.

EDIT: Beamish, just one last edit. You should try to make time to hit TCAF in the future, if you can. It really is a comics event unlike any other. Full of joy and connection, and not mired by dealers and corporate IP walking around. Just artists and fans connecting.

Anyway, back to sad stuff

User avatar
JSC
Joined: Thu May 16, 2013 9:17 am

Re: Passages

#11120 Post by JSC » Mon Sep 25, 2023 7:05 pm


User avatar
colinr0380
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 4:30 pm
Location: Chapel-en-le-Frith, Derbyshire, UK

Re: Passages

#11121 Post by colinr0380 » Tue Sep 26, 2023 1:21 am

One of his early films was in that great thriller Hell Drivers as part of the supporting cast with the also then up and coming unknown Sean Connery!

Whilst most of the attention will probably be on The Man from UNCLE, NCIS and The Great Escape, I am most fond of his performance (and haircut) in the 70s horror film Dogs!

User avatar
agnamaracs
Joined: Thu Dec 21, 2006 3:13 am

Re: Passages

#11122 Post by agnamaracs » Tue Sep 26, 2023 10:11 am


User avatar
Dr Amicus
Joined: Thu Feb 15, 2007 10:20 am
Location: Guernsey

Re: Passages

#11123 Post by Dr Amicus » Tue Sep 26, 2023 11:04 am

Can I just put in a word for Sapphire and Steel? One of the great British Horror / SF TV series with McCallum and Joanna Lumley as the eponymous inter dimensional agents (possibly?) investigating, well, frankly quite scary stuff (especially stories 2 and 4).

Post Reply